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Scarab73

'73 240Z rear hub bearings

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Hey Guys,

I went out for a roadie this weekend. Out of the "blue" I get this, somewhat, weird vibration out of the RRear. So, I get back to the garage, jack'er up, remove the wheels and start looking. I pull and tug on the universals, no play. While I'm there, I lube the outers. The inners seem to be a PITA. So, I'm rotating the axels and hear, like a dry bearing sound? It's smooth, but, noisy, if you know what I mean. Now, as far as history, I don't any, as I'v just take possession this past spring and the PO was not much on documenting anything. So, being new, where do these bearings get their lubrication, if any? I didn't find any thing loose that might cause a right rear vibration, thus far. The only thing I can come up with is wheel balance and bad rear shocks, at the moment.

Any ideas?

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The rear wheel bearings require removal to service. To remove the bearings you need to remove the stub axle. This is not difficult per se but it is not the same as the front wheel bearings. The nut holding the rear axle in is peened down to prevent loosing (later models use a Nylock self-locking nut). To remove the nut you have to grind off or lift the peened section (interestingly, the service manual appears to caution against this). If you do not do this the threads on the axle could be damaged. Once the nut is off the axle is pulled out using a slide-hammer tool. The factory service manual show the procedure reasonably well. Look at page RA-8 and RA-9.

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The rear wheel bearings require removal to service. To remove the bearings you need to remove the stub axle. This is not difficult per se but it is not the same as the front wheel bearings. The nut holding the rear axle in is peened down to prevent loosing (later models use a Nylock self-locking nut). To remove the nut you have to grind off or lift the peened section (interestingly, the service manual appears to caution against this). If you do not do this the threads on the axle could be damaged. Once the nut is off the axle is pulled out using a slide-hammer tool. The factory service manual show the procedure reasonably well. Look at page RA-8 and RA-9.

 

 

Hi,

I much appreciate your reply. I'll take a look at this again. When I read through the shop manual for removing the hub bearing, there is no mention of any covered nut or grinding needed. After removing the wheel the hub has a solid center. Behind it are the 4 attachment bolts to the housing. My shop manual simply mentions to remove the 4 bolts, after disconnecting the universal on the other side. Then attach a slide hammer to the wheels studs and pop it out. See for reference....

post-28835-099703100 1345512825_thumb.jpg

post-28835-087445300 1345512841_thumb.jpg

post-28835-034798600 1345512851_thumb.jpg

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Hey guys,

Regarding my mention of not seeing that "peened nut", I saw a drawing showing the wheel bearings and realize it's opposite of the wheel rim flange and I will need to gain access by first removing the out board universal from the inner bearing flange.

When I mentioned servicing the bearings, are they the type of bearing, one would grease pack?

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Once you remove the peened nut, the flange that the halfshaft (4 bolts) mounts to will come off. Use the slide hammmer and pull the stub axle out from the outside. Once you do this you will see how the bearings are lubricated. Basically the hub houses grease the that lublrcates the bearings. Slap a handful of grease in the hub and reassemble.

 

Joe

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Changing the rear bearings is a big job. I've noticed that I can hear the bearings on my car also, but I've put 25,000 miles on them since I noticed. They weren't loose then and aren't now. They're not tapered roller bearings like in the front, they're ball bearings, which tend to be looser and noisier in general, in my limited experience. You might think twice before replacing.

 

But if you do, here's a good reference - http://atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/rearwheelbearings/index.html

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Changing the rear bearings is a big job. I've noticed that I can hear the bearings on my car also, but I've put 25,000 miles on them since I noticed. They weren't loose then and aren't now. They're not tapered roller bearings like in the front, they're ball bearings, which tend to be looser and noisier in general, in my limited experience. You might think twice before replacing.

 

But if you do, here's a good reference - http://atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/rearwheelbearings/index.html

 

 

Hi,

Thanks for the very informative link. I learned a lot looking through your steps.

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...and for replacement, look for ref RW116 & RW117 as shown on blue website. You can get them for cheap on amazon or autozone for instance instead of buying them on dedicated Z stores. ;)

 

I was chasing for specific brand but when I ordered mine, I received SKF bearing in Timken box, so don't be too picky on the brand, they are all the same.

 

 

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Hey Guys,

Success!! I found the source of my rear vibration. It actually got worse when I took a another gear-head out for a short ride. It vibrated so bad, he was ready to leap out of a moving "Z". LOL!

Anyway, after jacking it up, I started probing the half-shaft universals and found a couple of loose fastener that were hardware store grade crap. Then the real kicker was two of the drive-shaft to the pinion flange bolts were loose enough, that I could spend the lock washers. I plan to replace them all with grade 8 and self-locking nuts.

Thanks to all who steered me in this direction.

post-28835-054748800 1346112440_thumb.jpg

Edited by Scarab73

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Once you remove the peened nut, the flange that the halfshaft (4 bolts) mounts to will come off. Use the slide hammmer and pull the stub axle out from the outside. Once you do this you will see how the bearings are lubricated. Basically the hub houses grease the that lublrcates the bearings. Slap a handful of grease in the hub and reassemble.

 

Joe

 

I could not get my stub axle to budge...need bigger hammer???

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I could not get my stub axle to budge...need bigger hammer???

 

We used this slide hammer from Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/17-piece-heavy-duty-slide-hammer-kit-5223.html

 

It worked but took a lot of pounding. By the time we got the axles out the hammer and shaft was badly mushroomed where they make contact and the center of the adapter was cracked.

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We used this slide hammer from Harbor Freight: http://www.harborfreight.com/17-piece-heavy-duty-slide-hammer-kit-5223.html

 

It worked but took a lot of pounding. By the time we got the axles out the hammer and shaft was badly mushroomed where they make contact and the center of the adapter was cracked.

 

I got the slide hammer from autozone w/attachment. My hands haven't been this tired since I was a teenager with the sports illustrated swimsuit edition.

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I would use a press. It's a quick job, you should get some help if you don't have one, it would be cheap.

 

Make sure to protect the threaded area with your old nut during the process.

 

You have to have the whole assembly off the car to use a press, but if you do that's the easiest way.

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so don't be too picky on the brand, they [wheel bearings] are all the same.

 

Absolutely not true! Stick with Timken, SKF, Koyo, or NTN. I speak from experience, use only those brand of rear wheel bearings. Had a failure with a generic Chinese bearing that ovaled the rear hub and galled a stub axle.

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I'm with John on the last statement. It should be 'Stick with a reputable manufacturer and they are all similar'---I'm a follower of the top three on his list. I've gotten not had good luck with Polish FAGs or Chinese FAGs despite being a reputable name... Always had good luck with German FAGs though.

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Absolutely not true! Stick with Timken, SKF, Koyo, or NTN. I speak from experience, use only those brand of rear wheel bearings. Had a failure with a generic Chinese bearing that ovaled the rear hub and galled a stub axle.

 

I agree as well with your statement. What I was saying was that when I was looking to source some bearings, I was picky with the brand & the cost. I bought some Timken units from Amazon but in Timken box, there was a SKF bearing and an NTN unit in the other Timken box. It seems brands are storing only some references. They share uncommon part numbers even if they are sold under different names.

Bottomline, no need to focus only on SKF brand for instance since you will likely receive something else. In my case, substitutes came from reputable suppliers, so I was fine with it.

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I wouldn't say that. Only very recently did Timken start reboxing other competitive brands. To that point, if you ordered a Timken, you GOT a Timken. And likely it was the best there was out there on the market.

Now, SKF and NTN will likely be the brand you get if you order a Timken for a Japanese Car, an *** or Timken will come for Euro Cars, and most American Makes (and older legacy products) will have Timkens in the Timken Box.

 

Generally if you order SKF or NTN, especially in a bearing application for a Japanese Car, that is exactly what you get.

 

Timken was traditionally an 'upgrade' even if they supplied to OEM, many times you could buy Timkens to replace Timkens which were tighter tolerance.

 

It goes into how you order the bearing, if you order by plain number, and without suffixes known in the industry like "C3" or "C4" etc.... you will get as someone said above "Generic Bearings" but when you start specifying the dimensional specs commonly used in the industry, along with other specialty identifiers they selection gets progressively better, likely will last longer, and generally will be more expensive.

 

I KNOW of one instance where SFK changed their bearing ID. Better metals allowed a thinner outer race, and they put in larger rollers. But you couldn't use the old inner with a new outer race! Look closely, they DO improve things over the years, and reusing races may not work all he time!

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AHHHH! You can't have a single! When you order FAGs, they gotta be in pairs. THAT is why they are astrisked now. No intermixing of brands, when you buy your FAGs, you gotta buy them in PAIRS or the board will reject your getting only one at a time.

 

Kinda Like Girls at Annie's Soapy Massage in Bangkok... Can't get just ONE! laugh.gif

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