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nick-james

Air damn and ducting for MSA front

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nick-james    0

I'm trying to improve on the aerodynamics of my Z.  I've deleted the size markers lights, antenna, side view mirrors (can get away without them in my area) and wipers (sunny day only car).  I switched to a vented hood in the hopes of extracting some of that high pressure from the engine bay at speed.  Now, my question is: Do people tie-in the MSA front spoiler to the radiator area?  The Z's around my area just leave it open, which looks strange to me.  It's my sense that it would be more effective to duct it to the radiator.  Also, I would like to block off the sides of the duct too since that area of the front really doesn't add to the engine cooling so I see no need for it to pass through the front.  I want to make the sheets out of carbon fiber.  I mocked up some templates out of card board to see how it looks.  Thoughts? 

 

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nick-james    0

People have done that before. You still have a massive area up front though. I would have also opted for the solid airdamn, not the one with duct holes. The "battle S30" also has an angled radiator.

 

That 'battle s30' is sweet!  I wanted to keep the side ducts for brake cooling.    The overall goal for me is to 1) Reduce the gapping mouth on the front and only let air in for cooling and keep the hood vents to allow the most air out, hopefully reducing lift.  I don't think I can hope for much downforce but I think I can at least get down close to neutral.  Even with a choked down ducted cooling path, there is still plenty of cooling.  Running sheet metal (or CF) from the radiator to the front spoiler also helps with support.  I can imagine at over 100mph, there is a lot of force pushing on the spolier, if anything it gives me some peace of mind.

Edited by nick-james

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260DET    25

You could try closing off right across where the prototype bits you have added are. Then duct the front of the radiator in. It's pretty hard to explain without pics or drawings but done properly you should get more front downforce. Aero for us amateurs is about knowing the basics and then trying to apply them to every bit of add on bodywork we do.

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JCan    1

Hello.  I recently purchased an MSA air dam and installed it onto a fully restored 240z.    When we first installed it the air dam worked okay but at 80 MPH the car started to lift a bit.

 

We were able to substantially improve on the aerodynamics by adding some aluminum plates designed to fit inbetween the lower cross member (Below the radiator) and the air dam.  This plate forces air into the radiator and does not let it travel below the car thereby increasing the vacuum underneath.  Today the car sticks to the road at speeds up to 100MPH.

 

Described is our simple project.  It requires manufacturing two plates out of 1/8" aluminum sheet.  This project was very easy to do and the results are easily felt on the road.

 

Directions are simple, manufacture the two plates (left plate shown, right is a mirror of the left) using a hacksaw and a sheet metal break (bending machine).  Place the plates inbetween the air dam and the horizontal support beneath the radiator.  Drill holes and use self tapping bolts to secure the aluminum plates in place.

 

The next step is to purchase a piece of aluminum rectangular stock 1/8" x 1".  Cut it to length and sandwich the top rear edge of the air dam inbetween the plate and the trim stock (1/8 x 1" ) by drilling and installing screws and bolts.   4 on each side should work.

 

below are pictures of our build.  FYI  - Jim

 

 

 

 

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Edited by JCan

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JMortensen    235

We were able to substantially improve on the aerodynamics by adding some aluminum plates designed to fit inbetween the lower cross member (Below the radiator) and the air dam.  This plate forces air into the radiator and does not let it travel below the car thereby increasing the vacuum underneath.  Today the car sticks to the road at speeds up to 100MPH.

Did you seal the top of the core support to the hood, and close up all the unused holes in the core support? If not, that's another place for air to go around the radiator. Other (better) option is to duct from the front to the core support so that air that goes in the front has to go through the radiator and whatever other areas you direct it to like air filter, fresh air vents, etc.

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JCan    1

As it turns out.  I have a '73 240z (even though it is built as a 72 240z).  This car has a piece of metal with a rubber edge that seals the hood to the top of the core support.

 

I drove the car 100mph today and at about 95 it starts to feel a little lighter, but nothing like the car did at 75 prior to installing the aluminum brackets as described above.  Datsun did a great job building this car.

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