Jump to content
HybridZ
Boben

240Z EgoBoost by Boben

Recommended Posts

Dude that Rear diffuser is sexy.  Awesome jig for the collector area of the headers.  Are you able to weld everything with all the headers tacked like that?

Thanks, I am quite pleased with the little more modern appearance that the diffuser brings to the rear.

 

As for the design of the exhaust manifold. The primary for each cylinder is a separate piece which connects to the detachable collector by slipping under a sleeve on the collector. Each primary is then secured to the collector with a retaining spring and holder. Even with this arrangement, the assembly of the exhaust manifold is a real pain, but what can you do.

When I finally get to the full seam welding part, I'll probably try and TIG weld as much as possible on the engine stand with the collector jig in place and then finnish off with the rest of the welding with primaries separated from the stand and jig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The clearance between the valve cover and the brake booster was tight to begin with and the situation got worse when I lifted the engine. However, this did not come as a surprise and yesterday it was time to execute my plan to increase the clearance.

 

Here is how things looked after rising the engine with the brake booster in the original position.

gallery_32042_1689_1314162.jpg

 

Here is the unmodified pedal box with the brake booster and clutch master cylinder inplace.

gallery_32042_1689_903254.jpg

 

I forgot to take pictures during the modification, but basically all I did was drill some new holes 15mm aside the original ones and cut some more space to the center to enable assembly of the booster 15mm aside from its original location. The displacement is big enough for the fork to clear the pedal axle and at the same time small enough for the booster to not hit the clutch master cylinder.

gallery_32042_1689_2021292.jpg

 

Here is how things looked like inside the cabin before cutting the fire wall. This is how I marked where to make the cuts and drills on the fire wall.

gallery_32042_1689_1961661.jpg

 

And finally the end result with increased clearance. Sweet!

gallery_32042_1689_1693212.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_637770.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been too long since I've updated on this build. Sorry for that. Well, here comes.

I got the tunnel finally welded back. With the new position, the HVAC unit was obviously not going to fit without modification so that went under the knife along with the original fixing points on the tunnel. The new mounts are not entirely ready yet, but at least I have proof now that the HVAC fits inside the dash. The lower fixing points on the dash also needed some cutting to make the dash fit. Here is some pics.

 

gallery_32042_1689_1298934.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2751750.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2546741.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_538209.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_1360186.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_1829371.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_1966472.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2547880.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_415856.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_554110.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2346638.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_1220297.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_479941.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2297021.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my friends at the garage dismantled an Alfa Romeo 156 V6 for parts. At the same time I was looking out for an A/C condenser for my 240Z and luckily enough, the Alfa unit has the perfect fit and refrigerant connections at a convenient location. I used the beaten old unit for fitment and fabricated some fixing points for it. I found some nice rubber grommets with thread inserts on them to use in the fixing. I have no idea for which car they are for and what they where meant to fix in the first place as I found them from a box we have at the garage that has all kinds of rubber grommets, seals and plugs everybody has just thrown in over the years. Anyway, worked quite nicely for me.

 

gallery_32042_1689_1742861.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_751345.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_87742.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2347947.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_3025469.jpg

 

After fixing the condenser in place, I was finally able to weld the lower radiator mounts on the rails and fabricate the upper mounts. The BMW Z3 M Coupe radiator sits nicely between BMW OEM rubber bushings.

 

gallery_32042_1689_120409.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_283387.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2124243.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_871611.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_408151.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_1281716.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2022526.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2886506.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_674126.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the condenser and radiator mounts finished, it was time to modify the opening in the front to accept the Alfa Romeo 156 V6 dual fan bracket / shroud. I removed the original fixing flanges from the bracket by drilling through the spot welds and finishing off with an angle grinder. Then I cut the opening. around 2mm from the top all the way and cutting into the corners of the opening on the bottom did the job and the bracket slipped right in place. I applied some weather stripping around the shroud edge and mounted the shroud firmly agains the condenser. Should work quite nicely. After a light sand blast along with the rest of the body and some epoxy primer, the bracket should blend right in.

 

gallery_32042_1689_3015666.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_936458.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2120915.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_3150735.jpg

 

gallery_32042_1689_2741492.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope those fans are intended to be mounted in front of the radiator (intended to push the air).  Most fans are mounted behind the radiator and pull the air through the radiator.

You are right. This is how most of the fans are mounted. The bracket was already removed from the Alfa when I got my hands on it so I am not entirely sure of the OEM installation. Based on a quick google search, might have been assembled in the back and meant to pull air through the radiator.

Quite many after market fans have the blade geometry symmetrical (straight) so that the direction of the rotation can be changed by switching the supply polarity, hence enabling the use of the fan both in a push and pull configuration. The Alfa fan geometry looks also suitable for both applications so I think it is going to work. Also, a fan can produce a much bigger volumetric air flow in a push configuration compared to a pull configuration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Alfa fan geometry looks also suitable for both applications so I think it is going to work. Also, a fan can produce a much bigger volumetric air flow in a push configuration compared to a pull configuration.

Now that I look at the picture of the fan I posted assembled in front of the condenser, I realize that the geometry is definitely meant for a pull application and not optimal for a push aplication. Too bad... I guess I'll just need to wait and see when the day comes when I finally get the car running, weather or not I run into heat issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, a fan can produce a much bigger volumetric air flow in a push configuration compared to a pull configuration.

 

You lost me here. I don't think this is correct. If I take a fan, and have it blow one direction, then turn it another direction, it's still blowing the same amount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1995 Mustang electric fan mounted ahead of my radiator in my front air dam. The fan was originally meant to be mounted behind the radiator as a puller, but I have it mounted as a pusher. The important thing is that I kept the flow direction the same. The inlet side of the fan is facing forward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You lost me here. I don't think this is correct. If I take a fan, and have it blow one direction, then turn it another direction, it's still blowing the same amount.

Depends on the fans initially design orientation. 'push' fans will often be optimized for higher static pressure than a pull setup. That being said, the real world difference isn't probably that big... Adequate shrouds are probably the most important factor.

Edited by tim.d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For mine, I made sure that the air that entered the front of the car had nowhere to go except through the radiator. The fan is only necessary when you are not moving. If you give the air an escape route after it goes through the radiator, then the cooling will be more efficient regardless of the fan.

 

http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/70097-show-your-custom-front/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the fans initially design orientation. 'push' fans will often be optimized for higher static pressure than a pull setup. That being said, the real world difference isn't probably that big... Adequate shrouds are probably the most important factor.

What I've come to understand from work dealing with filtered air cooling systems for electrical cabinets is that a fan has a hard time sucking air through a filter, which is basically the same thing as pulling air through a radiator. Also, while axial fans are capable of producing the same amount of air flow as radial fans without restrictions, the situation changes quite dramatically when a restrictive element such as a filter is introduced in front. In this confuration, the radial fan is the winner in terms of air flow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×