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OPTaiva

Zeta GT - 260Z 2+2 1977 T6

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Thanks!

 

This means quite a lot as I've been following your build here and on Viczcar.

Your engine choice is quite interesting and the frame work you are doing should be plenty stout! Really looking

forward the results you achieve!

 

Regarding my engine choice, there is quite a big scene of high power Volvo engines here in Finland so knowledge is

readily available. Of course a big reason was also that they are quite a lot cheaper than comparable BMW, Nissan

or Toyota engines and also quite compact packages.

 

-Olli

Thanks Olli

 

But mine looks industrial at the moment compared to your fine work.

 

I think its a great engine choice you have there, in keeping with the DOHC S20 L6 in the 432 240Z.

 

It would be interesting to try and have the cam cover restyled so to read Nissan 2000. I know that sounds cheesy but it would confuse a lot of people at first glance ;)

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Thanks Olli

 

But mine looks industrial at the moment compared to your fine work.

 

I think its a great engine choice you have there, in keeping with the DOHC S20 L6 in the 432 240Z.

 

It would be interesting to try and have the cam cover restyled so to read Nissan 2000. I know that sounds cheesy but it would confuse a lot of people at first glance ;)

 

Yes there are similarities with the DOHC S20 L6 and the Volvo B6284T or Tin Six.

At least they look quite similar, but unfortunately I haven't studied the S20 engine very thoroughly! Would be nice

to compare it to the T6 with a FSM.

The T6 was developed with Porsche so that might explain the similarities with a Nissan race engine!

 

Thanks for the compliments John, but I don't see your work as industrial.

It's purposeful and very nifty that you can just undo few bolts and the drivetrain drops out. I'm aiming for the

same with the diff cradle.

 

This is my first project and I have learnt to weld and to do sheet metal work during it so at least I know I'm doing

something right when fellow builders chime in!

 

I will be doing a different cam cover for the engine so the "Nissan 2000" text could be doable... Might be that "Nissan 2800"

would be even better and throw people off even more!

 

 

-Olli

Edited by OPTaiva

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Yes there are similarities with the DOHC S20 L6 and the Volvo B6284T or Tin Six.

At least they look quite similar, but unfortunately I haven't studied the S20 engine very thoroughly! Would be nice

The T6 was developed with Porsche so that might explain the similarities with a Nissan race engine!

 

Thanks for the compliments John, but I don't see your work as industrial.

It's purposeful and very nifty that you can just undo few bolts and the drivetrain drops out. I'm aiming for the

same with the diff cradle.

 

This is my first project and I have learnt to weld and to do sheet metal work during it so at least I know I'm doing

something right when fellow builders chime in!

 

I will be doing a different cam cover for the engine so the "Nissan 2000" text could be doable... Might be that "Nissan 2800"

would be even better and throw people off even more!

 

 

-Olli

 

Now that I have compared the blown S20 engine to the Volvo engine, they are really similar! Looks are cunningly

the same... Nice catch John!

Pictures here: S20 Engine Rebuild

 

-Olli

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Wow.. Nice work Olli!

 

Makes me want to go do some work on mine! Great to see another 2+2.

 

Douglas

 

Thanks Douglas!

 

I admire your engine choice!

My daily driver was a 2007 Audi A3 3.2 and I really liked the R32 engine. Responsive and nice to drive.

Fortunately I sold it to my future brother-in-law and I retained first buyers right to it when he's selling it.

My dream is to twin turbo it and make it a stripped racing car with beefed up transmission and Quattro.

 

The 2+2 models are few and far between, but we have Tonis' one here in Finland with a 1000 hp 2JZ.

I really like the forms of the 2+2... might be that even more than the coupés'! At least there is more room

in the cabin and therefore room for the back shifted T6.

 

 

-Olli

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That rust repair requires some mad fabrication skills but luckily you seem to have just what it takes!

Very interesting reading and footage. Good luck with the build.

 

How is the transmission tunnel height altered by this mod? When I did mine (definitely not finished yet!) I was also thinking of cutting into the transmission tunnel and raising it, but then finally opted for mounting the powertrain as low as possible without sacrificing the ground clearance too much.

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Ollie

 

As you love Turbo L6's

 

Thought I would point you to this Australian 4-0L L6 engine, one of the guys here in Australia who passed away a few years ago shoe horned this motor into his 240Z, The car was never finished but was running at the time he passed away.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Barra_engine

 

Barra 325T FGX Sprint

The final variant of the 4.0-litre inline six-cylinder turbo-petrol engine featured in the FGX XR6 Turbo Sprint. The engine employs an over-boost feature for 10 seconds when optimal atmospheric conditions are met when under full throttle, boosting power & torque to an almighty 370kW and 650Nm.

Power: 325 kW (436 hp) @ 6000 rpm Torque: 576 N·m (425 lb·ft) @ 2750 rpm

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Olli- The throttle bodies are some Bing units from a BMW 1100RT motorcycle. Not sure if they will get used at this point however, really wanting to go supercharged. Project is pretty slow moving at the moment however do to weather and funds.

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Like your style Ollie

 

Shame there is such a distance between us, think we could have a few laughs.

P.S.

 

I am having the rear fully adjustable - all 4 points - (On car) lower control arms made soon, once you see how I have set it up with the new diff cradle I have built, I think it will give you some idea's.

 

Thanks John!

 

I stumbled across your project and the Aussie Z scene in 2013. Believe me that a trip in Australia is in order in the future!

Hopefully few laughs are in the schedule then!

 

Looking really forward for the design you come up with for the diff! I bought my materials already, but we will see if I have to uprate them

as I haven't done any calculations for the forces involved.

 

 

That rust repair requires some mad fabrication skills but luckily you seem to have just what it takes!

Very interesting reading and footage. Good luck with the build.

 

How is the transmission tunnel height altered by this mod? When I did mine (definitely not finished yet!) I was also thinking of cutting into the transmission tunnel and raising it, but then finally opted for mounting the powertrain as low as possible without sacrificing the ground clearance too much.

 

Thanks Boben!

 

I'm subscribed on your project on DNSF and have been looking your workmanship in ave. Definitely one of the best projects

in the Finnish forums!

 

Don't know about the "mad skilzz" with the rust repairs... I just take my time and plan the working order so I can be sure to weld

the repaired portions to good and solid metal. Few more tools would be nice (bending brake), but we will see if I can manage with

a nice steel profile as my bending brake!

Might be that I need to outsource making of the rocker panels to my friend who is an automotive sheet metal smith... I will see!

 

I have not looked for the need for higher tunnel, but the ZF box is quite compact. Similar to the Toyota transmissions that come

with 2JZ or with Nissan RB engines. I'm also mounting the driveline as low as possible, but we will see how much butchering is

required! Might be that the easiest way is to cut the whole tunnel out and make a new one.

I will be sure to document that nicely!

 

I thrive to document the project as best as I can so I can use it as reference material when time goes by (I can't remember what I have done)

and when I'm going to register the car.

Should be nice to print the "journal" for the tech!

 

 

 

Ollie

 

As you love Turbo L6's

 

Thought I would point you to this Australian 4-0L L6 engine, one of the guys here in Australia who passed away a few years ago shoe horned this motor into his 240Z, The car was never finished but was running at the time he passed away.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Barra_engine

 

Barra 325T FGX Sprint

The final variant of the 4.0-litre inline six-cylinder turbo-petrol engine featured in the FGX XR6 Turbo Sprint. The engine employs an over-boost feature for 10 seconds when optimal atmospheric conditions are met when under full throttle, boosting power & torque to an almighty 370kW and 650Nm.

Power: 325 kW (436 hp) @ 6000 rpm Torque: 576 N·m (425 lb·ft) @ 2750 rpm

 

 

That looks to be one mean engine!

 

Unfortunately our road law gives us <3.5 litres as the maximum displacement for these cars so V8's and this kind of inlines are out of bounds.

By the way, Finland just won the international study for "Nanny state" by a large margin (http://nannystateindex.org/)! Yey Finland!

 

To keep the discussion in the engine, I'm aiming for 500 horses (373 kW) and 700 nm of torque. The engine handles 100hp per cylinder with just

upgraded con rods (h-beam). Might be a little handful!

At the street the power will be restricted to 250 hp as per regulations.

 

The dyno sheet should look something like this (borrowed from VRCF user Lankku):

103.jpg

 

Regarding Lankku, here he is crossing the 300 km/h mark at standing mile with an "angle by angle" Volvo 245 wagon:

Link to Youtube (302 km/h)

Link to Youtube (290 km/h)

 

The most crazy thing in this is that the car is his daily driver!

 

 

-Olli

Edited by OPTaiva

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Olli- The throttle bodies are some Bing units from a BMW 1100RT motorcycle. Not sure if they will get used at this point however, really wanting to go supercharged. Project is pretty slow moving at the moment however do to weather and funds.

 

Thanks for the info!

 

The idea of ITBs have been in my mind, but it might be undoable as I'm going with DBW throttle. Although there are ITBs for those setups

too in my understanding.

Of course their benefits in a turbo engine might be quite debatable compared for a nicely made conventional system.

 

 

-Olli

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This time around I'm still messing with the left rocker panel, but some progress has been made!

 

20160417-_DSC5427.jpg

 

20160417-_DSC5429.jpg

As the keen eyed reader might notice, the left rocker panel is gone as a whole and so is the front corner of the rear arch.

There were three layers of metal on top of each other and all of them crusty rusty. I'm no expert, but it might not have been the best structure.

 

20160422-_DSC5430.jpg

 

20160422-_DSC5434.jpg

Rocker panel inner part in the making.

The metal I used is 1,5mm and it will go from the front of the car to the rear inner fender.

 

20160422-_DSC5432.jpg

 

20160423-_DSC5437.jpg

As I don't have a proper dimple die kit, I had to resort to making my own.

All that is needed is (at a minimum) a drill, hand held router, some roofing screws, a sheet metal hammer and hard plywood.

I mapped the needed hole pattern to the sheet metal, drilled through the centers with a roofing screw to mark the

center points to the plywood and then routed 5mm deep circles to the plywood.

 

20160422-_DSC5435.jpg

To keep the sheet in place, I used the roofing screws and clamps and did three dimples at a time.

 

20160423-_DSC5440.jpg

 

20160423-_DSC5441.jpg

The end result...

The panel came out reasonably nice. It did go a bit wavy, but after I put it to its place with clamps, it straightened out quite nicely!

Next I need to get a suitably sized hole saw eg. 50-57mm one and drill the centers out to lighten the panel and to make it look more OEM.

Even though no-one will see the panel once ready...

 

Still some final fitting to do to the panel before I can weld it in place.

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Update time !

 

Hi all poor souls that read my ramblings (John)!

 

 

Unfortunately updates and work on the car has been on halt for a month as I have been finalizing my degree (chemical engineer).

Also me and my fiancée bought a flat so that and all related tasks has eaten a "bit" of my our time.

 

Fortunately we move in in next few weeks, remodeling of the flat is finalized at the same time and after next week, I should have my

degree also, so there should be some time to continue the Z-project.

 

Hopefully I can get the project moving during the summer holidays!

 

 

Thanks to all who read my updates...

it really means a lot as I try to be as descriptive and thorough as I can, so I can give back to the community

whom I have received so much information about these cars and various parts.

 

Hopefully there is some usable information there!

 

 

-Olli

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2 months Ollie !

 

No updates only means rust is setting in !

 

This truly is correct... rust is setting in, but still some updates are here!

 

 

Fabrication - "Racing Battery": Plans I

 

A long time has again passed since I made any progress in the project.

Life came in the picture as we bought a flat, I'm finalizing my degree and getting a second one, got a second dog, more responsibilities in the office and so on... excuses are many.

 

Now there is something that I have dabbled with in my head and decided to do a post about it.

 

EV and Racing batteries as in Lithium-Ion are quite interesting to me and the next step forward from AGM or Lead acid technology and people are using old laptop cells in making these kinds of batteries.

Traditional auto makers are also offering their solutions, but similar solution costs usually thousands of Euro (Porsche). This battery is going to cost me around 100 Euro, if all goes as planned.

I'm planning to make a 80 Ah battery with maximum discharge current of 160 Amps continuous and 320 Amps peak. I know this is rather overkill, but better safe than sorry!

 

I will be using Samsung 18650 cells as the building blocks and doing a 4s30p battery.

So 4 cells in series and 30 of these in parallel. Nominal voltage will be 14.4 V.

There are "better" cells that allow more current through them continuously, but I have a free source for these cells so beggars can't be choosers and 4C peak at start should not be so bad when the continuous is 2C.

 

This gives me a safe and small battery (at least in weight), that has room for expansion and capacity for a data logging system and in car PC.

 

Untitled.png

Here are my calculations for the battery.

Even though the capacity would be 80 Ah, the weight would be well below 10 kg when finished. Compare this to a traditional battery and the weight difference is huge. We are talking about 20 kilograms.

 

I could also divide this to a two units, where one pack (~60 Ah, 4s22p) would be for starting the car and other high current electronics needed at start and another pack (~20 Ah, 4s8p) would be for data systems and ECU.

 

 

This battery project I can do in my home so hopefully we will see some progress in this after I have all the needed parts and can begin the assembly!

 

 

As always, all input is appreciated and welcome!

 

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I will be using Samsung 18650 cells as the building blocks and doing a 4s30p battery.

So 4 cells in series and 30 of these in parallel. Nominal voltage will be 14.4 V.

 

As always, all input is appreciated and welcome!

 

Although many of the products commercially available do not incorporate a proper BMS (battery management system), I would highly recommend including that in the mix especially if the cells are second hand.

The cells are not identical even from the factory and different operation conditions will have induced further deviation in performance and most importantly internal resistance and capacity. Over time these differences tend to create voltage differences between series cells and for this reason, the battery should be periodically balanced. The most popular way is to use dissipative balancing at the end of a charge cycle.

To cancel out individual cell differences and to drastically reduce the channel count of the BMS, I would suggest a 30p4s configuration instead.

 

Definitely an interesting idea. Are you perhaps planning on a 3D printed housing or what is the plan for mechanics?

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About time !

 

Interesting project which I will be watching  ;)

 

 

Well yea... it was about time. I'm a bit ashamed how my project has been lagging, but hopefully it will start rolling onwards!

Your project, on the other hand, takes giant leaps forward, I'm a bit jealous!

 

 

 

Although many of the products commercially available do not incorporate a proper BMS (battery management system), I would highly recommend including that in the mix especially if the cells are second hand.

The cells are not identical even from the factory and different operation conditions will have induced further deviation in performance and most importantly internal resistance and capacity. Over time these differences tend to create voltage differences between series cells and for this reason, the battery should be periodically balanced. The most popular way is to use dissipative balancing at the end of a charge cycle.

To cancel out individual cell differences and to drastically reduce the channel count of the BMS, I would suggest a 30p4s configuration instead.

 

Definitely an interesting idea. Are you perhaps planning on a 3D printed housing or what is the plan for mechanics?

 

 

Thanks Boben for the feedback!

 

 

I have been thinking about integrating a BMS to the pack, but there is some contradictory information about them.

On the other hand, it would obviously be better for the cells and would be nice to know what the cells are doing,

but it would add another point of failure to the pack and it would limit the usability of the pack by cutting the

use too early.

 

Also there is EV packs, that have been running for multiple years without a BMS and the cells are "balanced" naturally.

You can check it here https://goo.gl/63CVc3 and here https://goo.gl/ZqSdmh. That is of course only one man's experiences,

but nevertheless.

 

 

I'm also going to check all the cells by charging them and then discharging them and again charging them full and leaving them

to storage so I will see if they lose their voltage.

 

I will be using this kind of charger for this: http://goo.gl/IvCAj2.

This way I can see if they are OK as if they are not, they will warm up when charged and that cell will be disposed off. Charging

current will be safe at ~0,3A and therefore no problems should arise.

Again Jehus' views in this matter: https://goo.gl/yG5SMI.

Thankfully he's collaborating with EV West so maybe he knows what he is talking about...

 

By discharging them I will see how high the Amperage of the individual cell is and I can group them together so the series

packs are as similar as they could be.

 

 

This possibility you mentioned about making 30s4p would need some thinking (I'm guessing you meant this)...

I would think this would need a quite hefty step-down regulator for the ~108 volt to usable in a 12 volt system.

I might be horribly wrong also! Although this of course would minimize the needed Amperage with higher

voltage.

 

 

I'm going to use ready made holders as in http://goo.gl/0D4UwK and further isolate the cells with http://goo.gl/WqycEd.

For contacts I will be using http://goo.gl/1fECp9 and soldering the cells to it via individual fuses, 0.25 wire

could be good, but I will need to check if it will be usable in my situation.

Soldering is not the best method, but I will clean the cell contacts thoroughly and use good flux so the heating

will be minimized.

 

Seems to do the trick for quite a lot of people, but we will see!

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I meant 30p4s as in first making four sets of 30pcs. cells connected in parallel and then connecting the four sets in series. This way you'll only need four voltage measurement channels. In your configuration the required number of channels would be 30x4=120.

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I meant 30p4s as in first making four sets of 30pcs. cells connected in parallel and then connecting the four sets in series. This way you'll only need four voltage measurement channels. In your configuration the required number of channels would be 30x4=120.

Well... don't I feel myself a bit dumb.

 

Now that you say it like that, all I can think is, how come I didn't think of that? That is so obvious, but I got fixated in my first thought.

Of course your suggestion is much more sensible approach and easier also!

 

Thank you very much for the idea and getting me to see the error in my plan!

 

EDIT: Correct me, if I'm wrong Boben, but wouldn't it be 30 channels for voltage measurement in my original plan?

As I would have had 30 series in parallel?

I'm using the same logic as you in your previous comment, but again I might be wrong!

Edited by OPTaiva

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Fabrication - Patch panels: Part VIII

 

This time around post gathers happenings from three different weekends, so it's a "bit" long one and picture rich.

 

Lets start by welding some metal back... and taking some more out.

20160925-_DSC6635.jpg

 

20160925-_DSC6636.jpg

I manned up and welded this piece in that I have made few months ago.

The reason for this delay was that I was hesitant about those dimples I made. Then I figured that I can always

take it out or refine it more when I have the proper tools to make proper "speed holes".

 

Yes the panel is a bit rusty, but I will treat the surfaces with phosphoric acid, so the rust will be converted into iron phosphate.

 

20160925-_DSC6638.jpg

 

20160925-_DSC6640.jpg

After I had tapped the inner rocker panel in place, I saw that I had to tear more rust out as there were more

patches inside the wheel well.

 

20160925-_DSC6643.jpg

This is what was underneath the patches...

I don't get it. Why bother to fix rust issues, if you are just creating more problems by welding three (3!) sheets

of metal on top of each other and leaving the rust below.

 

20160925-_DSC6644.jpg

 

20160925-_DSC6646.jpg

Quite a sorry sight and where I left off the first weekend.

Rust, rust and rust.

 

20161008-_DSC6648.jpg

Come the next weekend in this series, I had received my 15 ton hydraulic hole punch.

I had perused from the Internet before purchasing this tool, that one can use it also as a dimple die.

 

20161008-_DSC6649.jpg

I drilled the centres with a carrot aka step drill to 20mm as the tool needs that as a starter hole and went to town with the tool.

 

20161008-_DSC6652.jpg

The end result.

My system was that first I dimpled the metal by flipping the cutter side of the hole punch around and using the reverse

side as a dimple die. The dimension of the dimple is 89mm.

Second action was to punch the centre out with a 63mm punch.

Quite a good result, if I may say so!

 

20161008-_DSC6656.jpg

20161008-_DSC6658.jpg

This plate was meant to be as a pick-up point for the 48mm tube that I was going to run inside the rocker panel.

Measures 125x105x3mm.

 

20161009-_DSC6667.jpg

 

20161009-_DSC6668.jpg

Tube in question dry fitted...

After discussions with my friend and thinking this once more through, I have decided to abandon this plan and

leave the tube out.

It would just add more weight and not be any more beneficial than nicely made roll cage as it would be difficult

to tie this tube to rest of the roll cage.

 

20161009-_DSC6660.jpg

Same friend gave me a radiator for this project.

It's a Ford unit. Quite a massive at that with two nice fans. Should provide good cooling... if get it to fit!

 

20161009-_DSC6661.jpg

I will cut the radiator support out along with the lower part.

This way I can angle the radiator downward and get it to fit and at the same time fix the rust issues in this area.

I will be using the tube I left out of the rocker panel, as the material for the lower part.

 

20161009-_DSC6669.jpg

Finally... I packed the transmission in the car on Sunday and planned to take it to the welder who would mate the

Volvo original removable bellhousing to the BMW gearbox.

Unfortunately our timetables did not overlap, so the boot became home for the transmission for the next week.

 

One more job this weekend was to mock up a future modification...

 

20161009-_DSC6671.jpg20161009-_DSC6671-Edit.jpg
 

 

20161015-_DSC6677.jpg

Third weekend I started by dropping the transmission to be welded and measuring and marking the cut lines for the

"rust repair" of the rear valance.

 

20161015-_DSC6679.jpg

 

20161015-_DSC6681.jpg

 

20161015-_DSC6682.jpg

 

20161015-_DSC6683.jpg

All marked up and to be cut.

This mod lifts the rear line 12cm upwards and at the same time eliminates my rust issues in this sector.

 

20161015-_DSC6684.jpg

 

20161015-_DSC6688.jpg

First bite and more to be cut away as I left 5mm surplus material.

20161015-_DSC6689.jpg

All that was cut away.

Again triple stacked metal, rust and more rust and also glass powder and soda from the media blasting.

 

20161015-_DSC6692.jpg

 

20161015-_DSC6695.jpg

Before I finalized the rear valance mod, I decided to delete also the rusted out spare wheel well.

I drilled all the spot welds out...

 

20161015-_DSC6696.jpg

...drew a 70cm circle with a shop ruler to a 1mm sheet metal...

 

20161015-_DSC6697.jpg

...and then free handed the sucker out.

 

20161016-_DSC6702.jpg

Plopped it on and only one modification was needed as the rear lock support protruded outward.

Made a notch to the circle and drilled holes for the clecos.

Really nice tool those clecos! Pulled the sheet metals tight and made plug welding really easy!

The grey stuff is through weldable CRC Zinc which should stop rusting, as it acts as a sacrificial anode.

 

20161016-_DSC6705.jpg

 

20161016-_DSC6707.jpg

 

20161016-_DSC6708.jpg

Here is the panel all welded up (might need touching up) and dimpled.

Came out quite nice and rigid! Those 20mm holes will be plugged with rubber plugs and covered with seam sealer as will

be the whole perimeter of the panel and welds.

 

20161016-_DSC6713.jpg

 

20161016-_DSC6716.jpg

 

20161016-_DSC6719.jpg

Here is the "final" results of the valance mod with the bumper mounts chopped off.

Quite neat and tidy even without grinding with a flap disc!

Of course I still need to connect the inner valance to the outer rear quarter, but for this I might need the fender flares I will be using.

 

 

This valance mod of course means, that the original gas tank is unusable (was anyway) and I need to source/make a fitting tank.

Rear of the tank can be 10cm high and the front can be 15cm high. Width can be around 80cm and the depth can be 60 cm.

Might be that it's a bit difficult to find a suitable fuel cell as a product...

 

When you do the calculations, it means that the tank could be around 50 liters or a bit more (I'm not calculating the slopie part).

 

I'm also relocating the filler cap to the center of the car beneath the number plate and for this I'm going with a Suzuki GSXR flip cap.

We will see how it looks, but it cost around 9 euro delivered to my door, so damage is not massive if it's not usable.

 

 

This concludes our episode this time.

 

To be continued on next Sunday!

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Fabrication - Patch panels: Part IX

 

Well it's Monday now so once again my timetables did not hold.

Well nevertheless, here is the update.

 

20161023-_DSC6722.jpg

 

20161023-_DSC6724.jpg

First job was to mark the inner quarter panels to be cut.
I decided that I would like to make a similar shape as the original corners, so I measured 5cm upwards from the cut line.
 

After this I decided to raise the frame jig or rotisserie by 5cm. Now I can just roll around and under the rear of the car

with an ordinary office chair with the back rest reclined (and a bit bent).

 

20161023-_DSC6728.jpg

 

20161023-_DSC6729.jpg

Here it is cut and ground deburred.
The part with the marker cross marks will cut away as it still has problems... e.g. three metal layers.

 

20161023-_DSC6725.jpg

Right bumper mount area is quite rusted out.

 

20161023-_DSC6736.jpg

The same corner from the outside.

 

20161023-_DSC6727.jpg

 

20161023-_DSC6738.jpg

 

20161023-_DSC6741.jpg

Left bumper mount area from the "inside", outside and underside
One can see that there is multiple layers of metal in these spots also. Once again, I can only wonder what the previous

(at least one of them) had thought when making these repairs.
"Top notch job..."

 

20161023-_DSC6742.jpg

I began tackling the right rear corner by cutting the rotted metal out...

 

20161023-_DSC6745.jpg

...welding one of the existing seams shut...

 

20161023-_DSC6748.jpg

...making a quick CAD (Cardboard Assisted Design) template for the patch panel, transferring it to 1mm sheet and cutting it out...

20161023-_DSC6750.jpg

...fitting the patch panel in place with a different type of Cleco and by hand. I tapped it in place with a small weld.

 

20161023-_DSC6753.jpg

Once I had it in correct place and in correct orientation and angles matched, I began making small welds around the

panel and allowing the metal to cool after a little while.
The original metal was quite easy to burn through, because of the rust proofing on the other side, but I used a flattened

copper pipe as backing and heat sink. This way could fill the holes and get reasonable results.

 

20161023-_DSC6755.jpg

Once again a half final result.
I will still grind the seam flatter before doing paint prep and "bondoing", but it's quite flat even now so minimal filler required.
Also I need to box up the inner side of this corner, but I try to do it at the same time and panel as the inner quarter panel.

In my understanding (and to my eye), the panel and surrounding areas did not heat expand and the measurements held.

 

20161023-_DSC6758.jpg

After the right corner, I took an eye for the left one decided to cut it open.
Not a pretty sight...

 

20161023-_DSC6761.jpg

 

20161023-_DSC6763.jpg

Cleaned up a bit and waiting for CAD templates for the patch panels.
Well I did make one patch for the inner/upper portion of the corner, but there's nothing to write home about that...

let us just say it did not fit as I chopped it 10mm too short.
Oops.

 

20161023-_DSC6731.jpg

One last job was to mark the fuel tank cap area for cutting.
As I stated in the previous instalment, I will relocate the fuel filler to rear of the car and weld this area closed

(at the same time fixing one more rust spot).

 

That concludes my Sunday day and thus the weekend.

Tune in next Saturday/Sunday on the same rust channel at the same rust time!

Edited by OPTaiva

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