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OPTaiva

Zeta GT - 260Z 2+2 1977 T6

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Great work here.  No shame in feeling like your project is lagging. I feel like it with mine all the time. I should had been done with things long ago if it wasnt for my laziness. Loving your dimples, yours is actually more true/correct for automotive applications than the typical dimples you see, such as the ones in my thread.  Supposed to dimple in, then flatten back out with a thin lip, as seen made by you.  Thanks for taking pictures of the spare tire well removed. Now I know what to look for when I work on mine. Keep it going!

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Great work here.  No shame in feeling like your project is lagging. I feel like it with mine all the time. I should had been done with things long ago if it wasnt for my laziness. Loving your dimples, yours is actually more true/correct for automotive applications than the typical dimples you see, such as the ones in my thread.  Supposed to dimple in, then flatten back out with a thin lip, as seen made by you.  Thanks for taking pictures of the spare tire well removed. Now I know what to look for when I work on mine. Keep it going!

 

Thank you very much!

 

Those dimples did came out quite nicely even though the tool is not meant to do those. I encountered the trick in this

thread: http://www.350z-uk.com/topic/94605-trigs-drift-car-project-350-power/ (post #45 https://goo.gl/08omm0).

Quite cheap method compared to the traditional dimple die and shop press.

 

Yeah the reason why I try to document my project as best as I can, is that maybe I can help someone else with the knowledge

and they don't have to go through the same thinking process (if my thinking is usable and valid!).

Also for MOT, I need to have some proof of the work I have done, so they can put it on the registration certificate and deem the car

safe for roads.

 

The spare wheel well was quite easy to remove by just drilling the welds out with 9.5mm drill bit. I tried a spot weld drill, but it was

not up to the task and too small for those welds in my opinion.

 

-Olli

Edited by OPTaiva

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Fabrication - Patch panels: Part X

 

This time a quick and dirty update as was the visit to the car.

 

Around 6 hours was spent with these "achievements", but one can only wonder why and how it took so much time...

 

20161028-_DSC6771.jpg

First part of the left rear valance/corner patch. A bit difficult to weld it on as the original metal is heavily pitted/rusted, but still reasonably sound.

 

20161028-_DSC6776.jpg

 

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Lines came out reasonably close to the original and I could move on to the bottom part of this patch job.

 

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Before I could start making the bigger patch for this corner, I had to fix one more rust spot.

I cut a corner out of the rear rail...

 

20161029-_DSC6788.jpg

...and used a left over piece of steel to form the corner.

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I made a rough CAD of the needed patch and again transferred it to the 1mm sheet...

 

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...after few hours (around two) the result was this. A nicely sitting panel, but I really should leave bigger panel

gaps for welding... would minimize the proud welds.

 

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Tacked with few spots...

 

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...all welded up...

 

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...and ground down. Still need to address these patches by grinding some more, but might need a small belt sander

for that so I can do more precise work. Another way would be using smaller flap disks.

 

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I also drilled the center support out under the rear lock. It was in the way and I'm needing that space for something else...

 

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This.

Suzuki GSXR, "aviation style" in appearance, gas tank cap/lid.

Quite nicely made, aluminium, 110mm OD and came with a rubber seal and locking mechanism.

 

I'm going to put that at the rear of the car and then connect it to the "tailor made" gas tank.

Should be interesting to engineer.

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Fabrication - Patch panels: Part XI

 

Not much was accomplished during the weekend, but something and that is always better than nothing.

 

Without further adieu, lets get the pictures rolling...

 

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First of all, I noticed when I was grinding the welds flat, that there were few pinholes in the welds... I marked those

and contemplated if I should weld them up.

 

I will just lead the patches and be done with it. That will cover the pinholes and at the same time will smooth the

locations nicely... if I do it correctly!

 

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I ground the other side also and seems that there is still a lot to do.

Still I will be leading it so hopefully that will solve some of my problems with these patches.

 

https://youtu.be/87fuTnBS2bE

I'm watching this video from YouTube to learn leading, but still... you learn only by doing I would guess!

 

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I also tore the front tow mount out to see what would be under it... not a big surprise that there was more rust!

 

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After that I decided to fix these two bad boys...

 

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...pieces already cut out and first patch made...

 

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...both patches fitted and unfortunately more had to be cut out from the right one...

 

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...and welded up.

Again came out quite nicely, but I should be picking up pace as these took far more time that they should have taken.

 

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Next up I manned up and cut the fuel filler out.

I had marked the cut lines, but unfortunately the rot had spread more widely around the fuel filler as I anticipated

and I had to cut quite large piece out.

 

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Test fit of CAD model. Looks good, but was far too wide and tall. In other words, was unfit.

 

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After much toiling and grinding, cutting and fitting, I managed to get the panel bent and fitted to the hole.

Unfortunately I did not have time to weld the panel, but it fitted really nicely (top is a little proud so might need to address that) and should be quite ready for welding.

 

Got to say that these kind of clamps are really helpful to hold the piece in place and they also pull the different sheets level with each other.

 

As I'm quite happy about the outcome at this time, I really hope that my welding will be successful!

It would really suck to fumble the panel (and the side of the car) at the welding stage...

Knock on wood!

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On 14.2.2018 at 5:21 PM, ubergumgum said:

Nice project, how is it coming along?

 

Thanks mate!

 

Well the project has not been forgotten, but work pace is a bit slow.

 

The project diary has shifted to Instagram quite largely.

One can find it under @optaiva in IG.

 

In a nut shell:

- Both rockers have been changed

- Rear bulk head has been changed

- All floors have been changed (floors are still out as fitting a cage will be easier)

- Engine will be the Volvo T6 and projected hp maximum around 600 to the wheels, on street mode 250 hp to the wheels

- Engine will be 200 mm inside the cabin and car will be front mid-engine. Fire wall modded accordingly.

- Rear suspension will be the whole deal from a Z32TT as in R230

- Projected rear tyre is a 275/40/18 or 17

- Rear arches widened 50mm from each side along with the fronts

- Front spindles and brakes will be from a 2011 Mustang

- Rear seats will be left out and a ca 60 litre saddle tank will be made at their place

- Front seats will be Sparco ones

- Inside will be fully sound and heat insulated and upholstered

- All body mods done purely with metal and no fender flares will be used... all metal build is the goal.

 

Thanks for the compliments and hopefully I see you on Instagram!

 

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