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Won't start after fuel rail upgrade

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Alright guys, I have a 1976 280z with a l28. Mostly stock other than a stage 1 cam. Ran just fine before I messed with the fuel system. I went with the pallnet fuel rail, Toyota cressida injectors, new injector clips, and deleted most of the vaccum lines. I rewired the injector clips, solder and heatshrink tubing. Installed the fuel rail and injectors. The fuel rail is getting pressure, the guage reads about 35psi. I'm getting spark, replaced plugs and took one out and connected to wire while cranking and sparked fine. Won't even try to start, even with starting fluid sprayed in the intake I don't even get a hiccup. On another note my positive cable gets hot when cranking? I'm guessing just because it's using so many amps. Please someone help!

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deleted most of the vaccum lines. 

 

. I rewired the injector clips, solder and heatshrink tubing.

 

. I'm getting spark, replaced plugs and took one out and connected to wire while cranking and sparked fine.

 

Won't even try to start, even with starting fluid sprayed in the intake I don't even get a hiccup

Could be you shorted an injector ground and are flooding.  Check the plugs for fuel.  Are you spraying the starting fluid in to an intake port or somewhere else like at the end of the plastic snorkel?  Best to remove a hose and squirt directly in to the manifold.  If you're getting spark, the timing is right, and the cylinders are dry, it should start.

 

Odds are high though that you left a big vacuum leak when you removed those "vacuum lines" whatever they are.  Why would you do that, they serve a purpose?

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I just took a second look at your picture and see that the PCV hoses are gone.  There's your problem.  Put the PCV system back together.  Google "280Z PCV vacuum leak".  Read the Emissions chapter.  It's all there.

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Unintended consequences.  You can either put the system back together or block it completely.  It actually keeps your oil cleaner, and your engine bay.  Removing parts that aren't understood is a common problem source.

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I'm going to predict that your next problem will be that it starts but idle speed is off.  Either too high or too low.  It might also start and idle cold but die when warmed up.

 

Just a guess.  Enjoy.

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Well, that's a bummer.  Fuel pressure should be 36 psi but you should still get a pop or two.  It should start.  Are the spark plugs wet or dry after a no-start attempt?

 

Did you try the starting fluid directly in to the manifold?  Pop the little hose that supplies the AC control bottle and squirt some in there.  The hose next to the booster hose.

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How do you know the injectors were firing?  That's the part you just worked on so the most suspect.  If they were squirting and you have dry plugs, there's a logic issue.  You can see the disconnect there.

 

Is the spark strong and bluish or weak and orangish?  Sometimes you can get spark in open air but none under cylinder pressure.  The old 280Z ignition modules are failing at a pretty regular rate.

 

If random actions fail you could start at the basic troubleshooting steps described in the FSM and the Fuel Injection Guide.  The 980 Guide covers all years up to 1980.  http://www.xenonzcar.com/s130/other.php

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I took fuel rail off the manifold, and cranked the car while fuel shot into a tub I had. The spark issue would be interesting. It would make sense since I don't even get a pop with starting fluid. I'm not sure how I would go about testing that, I suppose I would just buy a new coil? Maybe new rotors and cap, the coil plug in the cap looks a little worn.

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76 has electronic ignition.  Engine Electrical.  You didn't say how the spark looked.  The fact that the injectors sprayed while cranking indicates that the coil was discharging.  That's what the ECU uses to know when to open the injectors.  Go to the basics of what's supposed to happen.  If the cylinders suck in some starting fluid and there's a spark you should at least get a pop.  Something's missing.

 

The details are important.  You didn't describe the spark, and you haven't said how you sprayed the fluid, just "in the manifold".  You might be spraying in to an electrical plug.  Who knows.  Thinking about replacing the coil without testing it is a bad sign.

 

The beauty of these cars is how much testing information is on the internet, free to anyone that want's to use it.  You could have had the whole system tested by now, with a meter and one of those books.  Just saying...

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Tried spraying some starting fluid into the throttle body while my wife was turning the car over. Boom!A nice fireball right back at me, usually I would assume this would be a timing issue, but I've made sure my plugs and timing are set more times than I've tried starting the car. I'm at a loss, I have no idea what else to try. I've never had this much problem trying to start a car.

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Believe what you see.  Figure out how it happened later.  

 

Did you pull the plug wires when you were doing the fuel rail work?  Or remove the distributor?  Many of these engines have been put together wrong and had their wires moved to "fix" the error.  You probably put the wires back the way they're supposed to be when the rest of the engine is right.  Put the timing mark on zero, with the cam lobes for #1 up, and see where the distributor rotor is pointing.  It should be pointing just left of straight ahead (there's pictures out on the internet somewhere).  Or do that and post a picture.  Or remove the distributor and see where the drive tang is pointed.

 

Equal voltage on both coil posts is normal.  It doesn't change until the distributor is spinning.

 

 

Here's some good information.  You don't need all of it.  http://atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/distributor/index.html

Edited by NewZed

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Alright guys. This was all my fAult, I was being lazy and zed you were correct. I took on the assumption that since my car was running before the project that my timing was good. The distributor was 90 degrees out from tdc. Threw the plugs on to match the rotor and bam! Fired right up! Of course I will not be leaving it like that but I wanted to say thank you to everyone that helped and had suggestions. I was so frustrated, but it's because I was taking shortcuts. Thank you enough! Especially NewZed for being so persistent with helping me.

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Good news.  Now, back to those vacuum leaks...

 

Those two books are still worth looking through, The FSM and the Injection Guide.  Nissan did a great job of describing how everything on their cars works.

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Sir

I didn't know about this thread or I would have replied sooner. I see that you have the lime green topped Toyota injectors. They will not work with the stock Datsun EFI ECU.
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The ones you wanted to switch to are in the thread below, second page and 8 posts down.
http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/52695-fuel-injector-upgradesswap/page-2

Thanks

pallnet

Edited by pallnet

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