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   In planning to do a restoration of my 240z, I knew that I would need a rotisserie to repair the floor panels properly.   Most

automotive rotisseries run about $2000 not including shipping.   A used one would run about half that amount.   For me, the problem was most rotisseries are large and take up a lot of space.  As I have only a two car garage, this type of rotisserie was

not an viable option.    After searching the Internet,  the idea of a tilt rotisserie was found.   The best version for me was a wooden tilt rotisserie.   This style is very compact and can easily disassembled after used. Second the cost is very low.  I spent

less than $100 for lumber and hardware(bolts, nuts,screws and nuts).  With the vehicle on its side, the floor panel, frame rail, and rocker panel repair is readily accessible.  Construction time was roughly 3 to 4 days.

                                                                                                                                                 Sunny

P1030378

   head on view of rotisserie in sitting position
 

P1030380

    rotisserie in tilted position
 

P1030373

 

 

P1030376

    front mounting bracket

 

P1030373

    rear mounting bracket
 
 

 

 

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Think roof beams.... at least if you have build the shed yourself and know what you put in there. We did it with an old engine crane in the back and a heavy duty lashing belt in the front and just suspend it from the ceiling. Not a long-term solution but if you know what you do there is no chance you will be cheaper....

 

IMG 0877

Edited by Villeman

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yeah but that option is always present when you use one, no matter which way (okay, no stiff connection bar with our setup) but its anyways just to check the undercarriage. When not in use we drop the hoist in the back and let part of the weight rest on a matress

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Not to worry, I used to be a bodyman  before and am familiar with splicing vehicles.   As to the question about how much to tear down the car,  it depends

what you are trying to fix.   The lighter that you can make the vehicle, the easier it will be rotate over.  Also keep the center of gravity low as possible makes

rotating easier too.

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A few words on center of gravity.

 

You want the CG of the car to be in line (or as close as you can reasonably estimate) to the rotation axis of your rotisserie. Putting the rotation axis above the CG makes it harder to flip over, and then the car will want to flip itself backover when you do finally turn it over. Putting the rotation axis below the CG makes the car constantly want to flip over on its own.

 

I'm not 100% sure how much that applies to those 90 degree only rotissary like the ones made out of wood on this thread, but if you're going to make one out of two engine stands (like lots of people do), keep that in mind.

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P1030385


 

 

I forgot to mention that for safety reasons- a pair of rubber wheel chocks are placed under the curved wooden section( on each side) of the rotisserie.  Never hurts to be safe.

                                                                                                                Sunny

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Posted (edited)

Returning to  Low Cost Rotisserie topic after almost a year.   Preparing my Z for media blasting. I decided to work on the rotisserie.  As the car will probably be in the normal upright position for the most of the rest of the restoration, casters must be added to provide easy movement.    Utilizing two 2" x 2" x 1/8" right angle shelving brackets formed into "U" shaped channel support between the two vertical supports of the rotisserie. 

IMG_2959.thumb.JPG.7bf669d9c651563c9d473dea52f7b90d.JPGTwo 4" metal casters were added to bottom of the channel.

IMG_2961.thumb.JPG.c18c1193fbad4555f883b0c08fce4690.JPGSupport channel is about 88" in length.

Each side of the channel us attaches to the rotisserie with six-5/16" x  1" lag screws on both sides.

IMG_2962.thumb.JPG.29abff56b3ddda7b3204a079ba8fa8da.JPGBack view of front caster support channel.

 

IMG_2966.thumb.JPG.80c25932c59f308216519dc7ef63714a.JPGEach 4" caster has a load rating of 250 lbs.

 

IMG_2965.thumb.JPG.1052951db8dd1d977cdcbc9524507465.JPGPic of rear caster support channel

 

These caster channels will be slid in position/ bolted down  after car is in the horiziontal postion and jacked off the ground.  These 4 swivel casters will allow the vehicle to be turned completely around  with ease.   Cost of casters was $10 each-Home Depot and shelving brackets were free(dumpster diving)

IMG_2971.thumb.JPG.ee78e955f775b2a50d04e0ccdbfbe241.JPG

A 2" X 4" board was cut down to fit in the center of the support bar and bolted to frame with  four 5/16" x  2" lag screws.   This was to provide additional strength when floor jacking on the bar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

'

IMG_2970.JPG

Overall view of addition to support bar

Edited by toolman
additional infor, new pics

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    After  rotating the car to the horizontal position,  I attached the two caster cross members.   Pushing the car around was fine but I noticed that

the rotisserie was wobbly when moved.   So I decided to  add a 1 1/4" galvanized conduit between the two ends of rotisserie to solve the problem.IMG_3030.thumb.JPG.8fde05f9287954739f2de0196cc9aea7.JPG

 

Two mounts were made to hold the  15 feet of 1 1/4" conduit.    Two 5/16" x 1" lag screws held the mount to the cross member.IMG_3031.thumb.JPG.f0c867b4ad0e1e00830693a05ecf3681.JPGA 3/8" bolt with welded nut holds the conduit in place.

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My friend made a rollover frame like this, except instead of a curved 90 degree edge, he made 2 45 degree bends. It gave a few options on what position to have the car in for different things. He made it from square tube, so on the upright, he had another tube that would slide into them with large bolts to act as a kickstand.

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