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Low Cost Rotisserie

rotisserie

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#1 toolman

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 12:26 AM

   In planning to do a restoration of my 240z, I knew that I would need a rotisserie to repair the floor panels properly.   Most

automotive rotisseries run about $2000 not including shipping.   A used one would run about half that amount.   For me, the problem was most rotisseries are large and take up a lot of space.  As I have only a two car garage, this type of rotisserie was

not an viable option.    After searching the Internet,  the idea of a tilt rotisserie was found.   The best version for me was a wooden tilt rotisserie.   This style is very compact and can easily disassembled after used. Second the cost is very low.  I spent

less than $100 for lumber and hardware(bolts, nuts,screws and nuts).  With the vehicle on its side, the floor panel, frame rail, and rocker panel repair is readily accessible.  Construction time was roughly 3 to 4 days.

                                                                                                                                                 Sunny

P1030378
   head on view of rotisserie in sitting position
 
P1030380
    rotisserie in tilted position
 
P1030373

 

 
P1030376
    front mounting bracket

 

P1030373
    rear mounting bracket
 
 

 

 



#2 Villeman

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 03:41 AM

Think roof beams.... at least if you have build the shed yourself and know what you put in there. We did it with an old engine crane in the back and a heavy duty lashing belt in the front and just suspend it from the ceiling. Not a long-term solution but if you know what you do there is no chance you will be cheaper....

 

IMG 0877

Edited by Villeman, 06 March 2017 - 03:46 AM.


#3 Nicapizza

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 05:21 AM

Looks like a good cheap option, but I would be concerned about body/frame warping over time, especially if you're cutting out the floor pans and frame rails



#4 Villeman

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 06:28 AM

yeah but that option is always present when you use one, no matter which way (okay, no stiff connection bar with our setup) but its anyways just to check the undercarriage. When not in use we drop the hoist in the back and let part of the weight rest on a matress



#5 Zzeal

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 09:50 AM

Hey, toolman, you beat me to it. But thanks, I wasn't 100% sure it would work. 

 

Here's my version:

 

Attached File  P1030368.JPG   75.92KB   0 downloads

 

Like you say, cheap, and easily knocked down.

 

Steve


Edited by Zzeal, 06 March 2017 - 09:53 AM.


#6 scartail

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 01:04 PM

How much of the car has to be torn down?


77 280z 5-speed


#7 toolman

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 11:19 PM

Not to worry, I used to be a bodyman  before and am familiar with splicing vehicles.   As to the question about how much to tear down the car,  it depends

what you are trying to fix.   The lighter that you can make the vehicle, the easier it will be rotate over.  Also keep the center of gravity low as possible makes

rotating easier too.



#8 Neverdone

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 10:28 AM

A few words on center of gravity.

 

You want the CG of the car to be in line (or as close as you can reasonably estimate) to the rotation axis of your rotisserie. Putting the rotation axis above the CG makes it harder to flip over, and then the car will want to flip itself backover when you do finally turn it over. Putting the rotation axis below the CG makes the car constantly want to flip over on its own.

 

I'm not 100% sure how much that applies to those 90 degree only rotissary like the ones made out of wood on this thread, but if you're going to make one out of two engine stands (like lots of people do), keep that in mind.



#9 260DET

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 02:22 PM

Two modified engine stands. The car can then be rotated 360 degrees which gives you different heights and angles to work on the body most effectively.

 

 

 

 

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#10 toolman

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 07:57 PM

P1030385
 
 
I forgot to mention that for safety reasons- a pair of rubber wheel chocks are placed under the curved wooden section( on each side) of the rotisserie.  Never hurts to be safe.
                                                                                                                Sunny


#11 auxilary

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 05:50 PM

2 Harbor Freight engine stands at $37 each and some steel from a scrap yard. Total investment (not counting wheels/casters) was probably $100-120

 

http://forums.hybrid...tisserie-today/


Edited by auxilary, 10 March 2017 - 06:51 PM.

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