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250 GTO Owners Thread

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...Thanks a TON Boy from Oz!

 

That's a tonne in my neck of the woods.  :)

 

No worries Lee. I'm not sure this is the forum if you're looking for top-end buyers, it's more populated buy DIY builder/owners. However, to that end I wonder if you have any photos of how you transformed the 'hatch' kit to a 'fixed window / trunk lid' arrangement. I'm sure there would be some interest in seeing that.

 

PM me if you still have difficulties posting photos.

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Great looking car, Lee.. It doesn't really seem to me to be from the old Alpha molds either - so much of the nose is different... The trunk doesn't even seem to be Tom's trunk kit.. though the rear might be his rear .. I see bits of several different cars.. perhaps it's something early from Tom (ScorpionZ)  I'm honestly a little stumped.. I'm not really used to being stumped by any of the GTO replicas  lol

 

Both of ours started life as Alpha1 cars.. and were modified far beyond that.

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Not many changes here on my stuff to show. The White GTO is still on the table - we did give up on using the 350Z front suspension and switched to C4 Corvette, but still a long way to go .. I've started making body parts for it though..

Before spring I want more appropriate seats in the red GTO.. The coilovers really made the stance look a lot better..

 

I'll try to share some detail shots this week.

I made my Jack hole plugs from a chunk of aluminum with a file.. took a while, but i think the result was worth it  :)

post-308-0-27764500-1490561463_thumb.jpg

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"I had never seen the interior of this one!! Thanks for sharing!!"

 

 

The Moss car is probably the best example of how the cars looked when they were leaving the factory.  They were simple, with no luxury, except for the demisting nozzles.  To save weight, they  even left of the door panel finishers, carpeting, ant most everything else.

 

I think if you took it to a "car show" I'll bet people will get (offended) by how there is no 'interior' and the simple aluminium seats would be called  "crappy seats" because they are not carbon fiber, with leather and not labeled Recaro.  The lack of carpeting, door panels, and the visible tubes of the frame are just too simple for anyone not thoroughly educated on the design.

 

Just in case, go here to see the photos.

Edited by TomoHawk

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"I had never seen the interior of this one!! Thanks for sharing!!"

 

 

The Moss car is probably the best example of how the cars looked when they were leaving the factory.  They were simple, with no luxury, except for the demisting nozzles.  To save weight, they  even left of the door panel finishers, carpeting, ant most everything else.

 

Every original GTO I have seen in person had the interior all exposed metal and painted either silver or black.. with simple blue or black seats. Of course there is the one with roll up windows and full interior, but I haven't seen it in person yet.   :) 

 

I have carpet, sound deadener, and A/c because I don't like to arrive at a car show looking like i just ran a marathon.. lol.. I do want more period seats though.

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"Period seats" ought to be easy enough to make.  You just bend some heavy aluminum into a curved seat back, then the same for the seat bottom, weld it together, and add a bit of K-Mart-quality (stadium seat pads?) to each, and some mounting legs to fit the floor.  I suppose a stadium seat from a sporting goods store would make a good example of the shape.

 

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There were a few "Lusso" (luxury) interior cars, with the carpets & padding,  which I think were the ones with the roll-up windows, so I kept that in mind when I decided to omit the sliding windows, which would probably drive me nuts anyway.Otherwise, everything was plain, but with a nice coat of paint.

 

IMO, from my research, not every 250 GTO left the factory in the same condition or state of manufacture as every other, so it gives you some leeway in your interpretation of what you'd want to have yours like.  Some were modified by the owners later, and the ended up with stuff like ROUND fog/spot lamps, or NO fog lamps (empty holes for "ram air?"), or a third cooling slot (330s had them, but some 250s needed them) and different gauge arrangements (like a Zed has.) My secret cockpit recorder (a digital memo gizmo) recorded people saying how the Zed seats were "crappy seats."  I suppose said "GTO expert" knows the GTOs came with the fancy, moulded carbon-fiber Recaro racing seats?   Heck, there's even stories of how the doors were different lengths. So much for hand-beaten bodies....  But, obviously, it all fit together in a good way, so the guys had everything "fixed" before the owner got the keys.

Edited by TomoHawk

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Beautiful location.... reminds me of the NorCal  coastline near Monterey.

 
 Does the earths magnetic field automaticlly flip camera images down under?   Because, it looks to me like you're driving on the wrong side of the road.
 
 
(Tried to post this text in the above post, but only the quote uploaded.  Where are those 14 yr olds when I need them??) ;)  :D
Edited by Fauxre

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What kind of jack do you all use?

 

 I've got the standard Zed scissor jack, and I'm wondering if it would cause damage to the bottom on the fiberglass rocker?  I suppose I could glue on a shallow piece of channel in the four places where you'd put the jack.  I think some kind of hard rubber would be better.  Both metal or hard rubber channel could be manufactured, then attached with glue or fasteners.

 

But faux jack hole covers for the antique Riganti jack would be a nice touch.

 

Here is a Riganti jack and a jack hole plug.  I'm surprised no one was killed using those jacks.

 

post-309-0-22272700-1492221805_thumb.jpg        post-309-0-23436500-1492221827_thumb.jpg

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What kind of jack do you all use?

 

 I've got the standard Zed scissor jack, and I'm wondering if it would cause damage to the bottom on the fiberglass rocker?  I suppose I could glue on a shallow piece of channel in the four places where you'd put the jack.  I think some kind of hard rubber would be better.  Both metal or hard rubber channel could be manufactured, then attached with glue or fasteners.

I welded moly tubing into the chassis inside the rocker and behind the front fenders. Technically, if I have a flat on the side of the road, i could use the original jack, but I also welded air jacks into the car so I can jack mine with an air hose. :)

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One thing that got lost during the conversion is the air coming from the lower (foot) vents. As far as I can tell, the air comes from a 'scoop' that's part of the lower front wheel splash guard.   The air pressurizes the area inside the front fender and then flows through a passage to the lower vents.  When you remove the front bodywork, you remove the air scoop and the large duct formed by the fender & splash guard, so you no longer get the  forced air.

 

The 240Z didn't have the air scoop at the lower part of the front fender, so they added the plastic elbows from the radiator support to the fender area.

 

I used my shop vac to blow are into the lower vent and searched to see if the air came out somewhere, like the windscreen wiper linkage area, but that is for the intake of fresh air to the ventilation/heater system.  If I ha done this before permanently fixing the front bodywork,  I would have provided another air path, like a 1-inch hose from somewhere near the nose.The exact place where the air get to the lower vents  would be nice to know....

 

So my question is, how can you get air to the lower vents? A long hose from the brake cooling intake holes?  Air scoops on the sides by the engine vents?

 

It would also be nice to have some forced air into the upper (dash) vents, but that is easily done by adding the hood scoops and short ducting, like you are familiar with.

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TomoHawk, Check around at various trophy shops and see if they can laser engrave.

al the trophy shops in my area are only able to engrave flat things like trophy plaques and medalions.  The best the could do for me is to engrave a metal disc and I would have to glue it to the wheel nut, which might even look like the Boranni nut.  Getting the disk machined is another tall hurdle, unless you have the CNC codes to do the work.  There aren't any small shops either-  all the older guys that worked from the home shops are out-of-business or retired.

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I welded moly tubing into the chassis inside the rocker and behind the front fenders. Technically, if I have a flat on the side of the road, i could use the original jack, but I also welded air jacks into the car so I can jack mine with an air hose. :)

I suppose you never saw a certain Interet add for an air bag-jack that is inflated by exhaust?

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Here's a new thing that I'd like to do this summer....

 

The Zed bonnet had the louvers, and the GTO wings have the vent slots, so can we make some kind of vent slots in the back corners of the engine bay?  I think I can get in there with a   11/2   inch hole saw and make two holes in a vertical line, then connect them for a slot.

 

Would that be a problem with the stock L28 engine?  You wouldn't want to end up with a banana car.

 

Otherwise,  I'll have to rig up a kind of spacer to hold the bonnet open about 3 inches, so the hot air can get out while parked or idling;  the open bonnet seems to attract attention. :o

Edited by TomoHawk

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Here's something for you problem-solvers....

 

Car manufacturers start using VIN number in the mid-1950s, bur they were not standardized, even for any particular manufacturer, like Ferrari.

 

So, besides the chassis' individual serial number, did these cars have some sort of VIN?  I was able to find some bits of information:

 

Chassis designations:

400 SA:  538 U
250 SWB/SWB Cal/GTO:    539
250 GT Lusso:    539 U

 

Paint Code:

Rosso Cina paint code:  20456 S

 

So if you wanted to build a USA-style of a VIN, you could.  OTOH, each GTO was personally sold by the dealer to the owner, and probably new the owner very well, and there were only the few  cars made, so if you if you needed anything, you didn't have to enter the VIN (into  computer) to get a part...

 

But I'm still curious to see what there was at the time... 

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Here's a new thing that I'd like to do this summer....

 

The Zed bonnet had the louvers, and the GTO wings have the vent slots, so can we make some kind of vent slots in the back corners of the engine bay?  I think I can get in there with a   11/2   inch hole saw and make two holes in a vertical line, then connect them for a slot.

 

Would that be a problem with the stock L28 engine?  You wouldn't want to end up with a banana car.

 

I drilled holes in the sheetmetal behind the front shock towers.. then reinforced it and added some 5" fans to help extract heat.. I feel like every little bit we can do helps

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