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Safety tips for fabricators!


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#1 grumpyvette

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 06:10 AM

http://www.chevytalk...post/last/#LAST

if your not aware if this you should be!! most soft metals tend to load up a grinding wheel and as the surface becomes loaded it tends to grab and shock load the wheel, which tends to either jam or throw the part or frequently the grinding wheel explodes from the sudden load/shock and large chunks get thrown at high velocity, getting killed/hurt is not infrequent

"GALLING
The damaging of one or both metallic surfaces by removal of particles from localized areas due to seizure curing sliding friction or impact welding under pressure of two similar metals


http://files.aws.org...cts/FACT-16.PDF

http://www.safetylin...echhazd0001.htm

http://danrrec.ucdav.../15_grinder.pdf

http://www.magion.co...ng/galling.html
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#2 Cody 82 ZXT

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 07:26 AM

Great post. Nice to pass on safety info. Maybe we need to make a safety sticky in the fabrication forum. I know I'm always looking for good hints and tricks for fabrication and safety.

Thanks
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#3 JMortensen

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 07:32 AM

Great post. Nice to pass on safety info. Maybe we need to make a safety sticky in the fabrication forum. I know I'm always looking for good hints and tricks for fabrication and safety.

I think this is it. I'll change the title and sticky it. Good stuff guys!

Jon Mortensen, owner/operator www.petdoorstore.com


#4 2126

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 08:20 AM

A little technical correction on why a grinding wheel can come apart when loaded with soft metals, such as aluminum, is......The embedded soft metal expands from the heat generated by grinding and causes the wheel to fracture.

#5 280z1975

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 08:28 AM

Why the hell was I never taught this one in metal shop in High School? We only ever really worked on iron and build trailers. Still, that would have come in handy knowledge back then and I am glad to know it now. We did however get the never move a gas tank without a safety cap ... there was even a patch in the wall with newer cyinder blocks to go along with that story :o

So what is the best way to cut soft metals?

#6 JMortensen

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 09:45 AM

Cutting soft metals? I use my bandsaw for that. I'm not too sure about brass or copper or other metals, but you can cut aluminum with wood saws too, like a table saw or a chopsaw. Just need a carbide blade and you need to go SLOW. I have some "airhorns" on my Mikunis which were made from a plate of aluminum and had the airhorn part routered in with a 3/8" radius carbide router bit that was intended for wood.

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#7 grumpyvette

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 10:24 AM

2126 is CORRECT

but GALLING also causes failures

"GALLING
The damaging of one or both metallic surfaces by removal of particles from localized areas due to seizure curing sliding friction or impact welding under pressure of two similar metals

BTW COPPER/and BRONZE are frequently bad about this

http://www.safetylin....chhazd0001.htm

http://danrrec.ucdav....15_grinder.pdf

http://www.magion.co...ng/galling.html
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#8 Roostmonkey

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 10:25 AM

All of those soft ( non ferrous ) metals should be cut,sanded or whatever, with a cutting wax to resist the load up on sanding discs or blades. I prefer a sanding belt or disc over a hard stone wheel for everything but hardend steel. The only thing I use the wheel for is sharpening tungsten electrodes.

#9 Mul-ti-pass

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 06:13 PM

I do a lot of aluminum grinding. I never use a grinding wheel. The best method I've found is to use a cut off wheel to remove the bulk, and then move to a flap disk of about 40 grit for the rest. When sanding softer aluminum such as a 40 series or lower you have to move around a lot or cool the metal often. Flap disks aren't nearly as dangerous as grinding wheels are. I use a 50 series wire which is much harder, and allows me to grind away without it heating up and getting soft. It also has the added benefit of being a better color match for 60 series aluminum sheet.
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#10 grumpyvette

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 01:15 AM

BTW the question of which auto darkening welding helmet comes up frequently so,

Ive got 4 auto darkening hoods now,
but I use the cheap a$$ harbor freight hood more and more for two reasons,
first it works flawlessly, and second if I screw it up with welding splater Im out something less than $50 so its no big deal to weld overhead or get a bit careless with it, and I can save my $340 hood to impress guys while it hangs on the welder cart, as its not significantly better in any function but snob appeal, and while it looks great,its not much better in function, in my opinion
in fact Ill buy a second spare for the shop,next time I drive bye HF


http://www.harborfre...temnumber=46092

http://www.harborfre...temnumber=94336

might as well get a couple of these also while your there

http://www.harborfre...temnumber=94128

http://www.harborfre...temnumber=98704
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#11 Evan Purple240zt

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 05:48 AM

Grumpy, I have that same helmet. I had a higher end auto darkening unit years ago and the HF works just as well for my general hobby use.

Much safer than closing your eyes to tack things together.
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#12 Tony D

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 08:45 AM

you close your eyes for a tack weld?

maybe that's why they get so scratchy by the end of the day....

(Makes mental note: "Try closing eyes before pulling trigger for tack welds...)

#13 Evan Purple240zt

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 11:17 AM

you close your eyes for a tack weld?

maybe that's why they get so scratchy by the end of the day....

(Makes mental note: "Try closing eyes before pulling trigger for tack welds...)


Haha, I remember when I built my downpipe. I had serious "sunburn" from tacking everything a billion times. I am also white as a ghost LOL.
1995 240sx....
1972 240z RIP

#14 grumpyvette

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 03:48 AM

http://www.brewracin...es.com/id75.htm


http://brassmein.com...weldingrods.htm

http://www.cpwr.com/...s/kfwelding.pdf

http://www.safety-co...OSH/welding.htm

http://forum.grumpys...php?f=60&t=1669


well worth reading thru, yes you'll need to actually read thru the info!, but failing to do so could KILL YOU, so take the effort

Edited by grumpyvette, 24 July 2009 - 05:14 AM.

" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#15 cockerstar

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 11:16 AM

Oh, and on the auto darkening hood discussion, I also have a cheap china-brand one, and it works well for hobby use. I really do prefer it over my friend's "middle of the road" model because his has preset darkness levels, where I have an actual adjustment knob.
The $350+ autoglas helmets are really designed for someone who is going to be wearing it for more than 6 hours per day on a regular basis.
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#16 BURLEIGH

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 08:21 AM

http://www.brewracin...es.com/id75.htm


http://brassmein.com...weldingrods.htm

http://www.cpwr.com/...s/kfwelding.pdf

http://www.safety-co...OSH/welding.htm

http://forum.grumpys...php?f=60&t=1669


well worth reading thru, yes you'll need to actually read thru the info!, but failing to do so could KILL YOU, so take the effort



THANK YOU for this post... It very well could've saved my life as I do the same thing with the brake cleaner on occasion!!

#17 grumpyvette

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 08:50 AM

always glad to help! BTW anyone who has any useful safety tips, PLEASE POST THEM, as we ALL need to think about those factors while working.
and YES IM AMAZED at the skills some of the members have shown and stand AWED at a few of the project some have built, you gentlemen on this site should feel proud as its people like you,that are willing to swap drive trains and modify cars significantly from their original configurations, that advance the hobby's skills far more than the guys that simply replace store bought components on cars that those parts were built to fit on.

Edited by grumpyvette, 06 November 2009 - 10:16 AM.

" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#18 grumpyvette

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 11:31 AM

http://www.gixxer.co...ad.php?t=242261

read thru this, as its a good reminder about thinking thru the potential results of working around power tools, running engines etc.
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#19 BURLEIGH

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 06:01 AM

I've seen that kind of thing personally... Had a guy on a job I was inspecting decide that he needed to clean the auger of a large highway boring machine while it was running! It caught his glove and ripped his arm right out of it's socket!!!

I just try to keep in mind that metal is harder than flesh:shock:!

My dad used to teach Building trades at the high school when I was growing up. The first day of class he would bring a package of hotdogs and take all the teenagers to each machine and show them just what thier finger would look like if they got it too close... He always said that at the end of the day, you could still count to ten on your fingers then it was a good day!
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#20 grumpyvette

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 04:40 PM

in my experience many items at HF are basically cheap crap but there are exceptions or stuff that's cheap enough that you can use it and throw it away if it fails without feeling bad about the cost, the first three items are in the cheap enough category, the jack stands can be found on sale cheaper but are a very good value as they are the correct height to work under your car and strong enough to be safe, with a 12 ton rating and a 3 ton car, four of them provide an except-able safety margin, Ive used four in my shop for over 15 years or more and never had the least problem, the 12 ton jack stands are a good value in my opinion

http://www.harborfre...do?itemid=91214
Posted Image

these work surprisingly well for most welding and if they get screwed up your only out $50

http://www.harborfre...do?itemid=96451

this can save you some serious time trouble shooting even if its not dead on accurate

Posted Image

http://www.harborfre...do?itemid=94357
Posted Image

working under a car without some safety glasses is rather stupid at this price

http://www.harborfre...temnumber=34924
Posted Image
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"




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