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arc welding rod info


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#1 grumpyvette

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 12:53 PM

"THE TORCH"

WAS NICE ENOUGHT TO POST THIS WELDING ROD INFO

Arc welding electrodes are identified using the A.W.S, (American Welding Society) numbering system and are made in sizes from 1/16 to 5/16 . An The E6011 is not a complete number. It also needs a diameter designation such as "1/8" E6011 electrode."

The rid (electrode) is 1/8" in diameter

The "E" stands for arc welding electrode.

Next will be either a 4 or 5 digit number stamped on the electrode. The first two numbers of a 4 digit number and the first 3 digits of a 5 digit number indicate the minimum tensile strength (in thousands of pounds per square inch) of the weld that the rod will produce, stress relieved. Examples would be as follows:

E60xx would have a tensile strength of 60,000 psi. E110XX would be 110,000 psi

The next to last digit indicates the position the electrode can be used in.

1. Exx1x is for use in all positions
2. Exx2x is for use in flat and horizontal positions
3. Exx3x is for flat welding

The last two digits together, indicate the type of coating on the electrode and the welding current the electrode can be used with. Such as DC straight, (DC -) DC reverse (DC+) or A.C.

* Exx10 DC+ (DC reverse or DCRP) electrode positive.
* Exx11 AC or DC- (DC straight or DCSP) electrode negative.
* Exx12 AC or DC-
* Exx13 AC, DC- or DC+
* Exx14 AC, DC- or DC+
* Exx15 DC+
* Exx16 AC or DC+
* Exx18 AC, DC- or DC+
* Exx20 AC ,DC- or DC+
* Exx24 AC, DC- or DC+
* Exx2711 AC, DC- or DC+
* Exx2811 AC or DC+

So the E6011 has a tensile strength of 60,000psi, can be used in any position and can be used in either AC ot DC- welding. Basically it is a middle of the road welding rod. that can be used by less experienced welders in a variety od situations since it produces a deep penetrating weld and works well on dirty,rusted, or painted metals. A similar rod is the E6010. It produces similar results but can only be used with DC+ or DCRP (DC Reversed Polarity)


Ive been welding for 35 plus years and always asked for and got advice from the local MILLER DEALER,after explaining the welder to be used, the application, etc,then purchased the suggested rods IN BULK packs and never bothered to as what the numbers ment....
never said I was a GREAT weldor, but Ive welded lots of stuff over the years,thats still in use without it breaking,and while its not always the best looking job it STAYS WELDED ...IM working on the LOOKS PART, and the recent MILLER 330 AMP TIG purchase HELPS
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#2 e_racer1999

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 02:17 PM

thanks for that info! very.... informative!
Jason King
JGoldPerformance@gmail.com
6/72 240Z / HLS30 89646 (Yellow)

#3 tannji

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 09:40 PM

That 6011 rod covers a lot of situations and a lot of deficiencies.... but I have a couple of old-timers around here that apparently prefer 1109. Threw me for a loop.. because I am not a welding old-timer, either in application or sales. One of my co-workers rectified my ignorance by pulling out a 6011 rod, showing me the stamped ID on the holder end, then turning it over and handing it to the customer. Voila... 1109 rod. Consider this young whipper-snapper put in his place. = )

#4 proxlamus©

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 09:29 AM

i like 7018 rods.. just hard as hell to spark.

6011 is nice but ugly ass welds.

tannji thats a funny story lol
Currently on a rotisserie for a full restoration - L28 with 9mm rods, 88mm Ross pistons (3.0L), 8.5:1 CR, Schneider Stage II cam, Holset HY35W, Megasquirt, Suzuki GSXR ITB's and home made intake plenum, Z32 transmission, Fidanza aluminum flywheel, ACT stage II clutch and pressure plate, coil-overs, vented 4x4 front brakes, 240sx rear brakes, Corbeau FX1 Pro seat, (soon to be half cage) and still debating the paint.. hurm

#5 N3RB

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 09:00 PM

7018 make a beautiful bead =)
--1978 280z manuel with Rebello 3.2 Engine--

100,000 miles on the car Sept 15, 2007.



#6 jnjdragracing

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:20 AM

Good info,

I have always used the 6011 rod, why because this rod was giving to me when I 1st started welding and I have always used it. I will have to try the 7018.

Thanks again GrumpVette for the information.

John
No Need To Go Through Life Scared......

#7 grumpyvette

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 06:47 AM

youll be best served asking DETAILED WELDING questions HERE, your always better off asking pros in the tech field rather than hobbiests

http://www.millermot...display.php?f=3

http://metals.about....w.pl?markRead=1

http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtalk/
" IF YOU CAN'T SMOKE THE TIRES FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!"

#8 roger.svoboda

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 07:07 AM

7018 makes a nice weld but you need a good clean joint. if blowing through paint and rust is an issue stick with the 6011. those low hydrogen rods can fool you. nice looking weld but no penetration.

#9 locodrftr

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 01:08 PM

not to mention they need to be kept in a rod oven, but i like 7018...what i used to get LA city certified




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