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Gollum

Gollum's DD L28ET 75'

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Seems like updates are getting further and further apart, but I promise there's movement! (promising myself as much as anyone)

 

I redid my main "dash" panel, which I now call my "bulkhead" because really it's just for mounting all my main wiring components. My goal was that there's a "fork" of functions in regards to wiring in my car. There's "chassis" and there's "engine". Other than sharing the required 12V source and a "turn things on" capability, they shouldn't touch or require each other. Beyond that, I wanted all my "chassis" wiring to be completely replaceable and diagnose-able in easy to manage chunks. If I have a problem, I want to be able to be fairly certain that the problem is either at the bulkhead, or the device. For instance: if I have an issue with my front left turn signal, I want to be able to verify I have no relay/fuse/switch issue in ONE LOCATION before having to diagnose if there's 12V/GND at the light itself, or vice versa. This simplifies diagnostics more than you can imagine. Stock relays could hide anywhere. 12V sources could come from anywhere. Grounds could go anywhere. There's such a mess of slices in the stock chassis harness that it makes me queasy to think about.

 

So that said, my bulkhead:

 

IMG_20160407_225519.jpg

 

 

You'll note the use of aluminum conduit, and that's admittedly unconventional and I wouldn't exactly recommend it for everyone. What it offers me is an easy to way pull new runs if I decide to add wiring down the road, as well as cheap connections to make loom pathways through sections of body. Weather tight fittings are a thing, and they're not pricey. It's a fairly low weight investment, and makes me feel much better about doing ground-up chassis wiring than just covering it in typical plastic loom.

 

This last weekend I got my tail light wiring completed, and I'm still using the stock panel harnesses back there, but I've at least abstracted the wiring in the sense that I can easily upgrade the panel down the road and also conforms to star grounding and the grounds all come back to that bulkhead.

 

Next up is to get the front lighting done so I can check off the "lighting" box on the to-do's and feel like it's that much closer to "road worthy" as I near engine-running state.

 

Which brings us to engine.

 

I've procured a MN47 head, that sadly will for now go on a turbo dish bottom end, which is far from ideal. I just want to travel the path of least resistance to get running, which means dealing with the drawbacks I'm going to encounter.

 

The good(est) news is that en-route right now, is a full MS3X setup:

 

img_20160410_132751_1024.jpg

 

 

Beyond that, I'm going COP out the gate. About to purchase a transistor/ignotor box from a Z32 + the DIYautotune trigger wheel to drop into the dizzy. Coils will be the ones Ford used on the modular 4.6, as I have a friend with a small pile willing to just give me six (and likely a spare or two just in case). This should alleviate any issues that arise from the imperfect combustion arrangement, even if it means down a power in the bottom half or more of the rev range. 

 

Also, the head had a broken stud (I broke it trying to pull it) and is with a friend (COP donor) who has a drill press and will hopefully be able to grind it out for me. Once back and free of stud I'll drop the head on and start assembly.

 

 

Also, part of my excuse for being so slow to work on this has been the whole adulting thing (getting married, having kids, etc), so here's picture proof.

 

 IMG_20160407_193538.jpg

 

 

Note: Odds are I won't be able to do engine wiring with the conduit, which is sad, but not the end of the world. I just don't want to fuss with more than I have to at this point.

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Nice! Does MS3 have flex-fuel interpolation capability?

Yup. You can drop in one of the Ford or GM ethanol sensors and run any mix you want provided you've tuned the range of course. You can also run staged injection between any two fuels with table switching/blending. The only caveat is that switching is always done from ms3x to ms3 injector outputs so obvious have to be batch injection on one set of injectors.

 

I plan to tune on 87 octane if I can, and once I've got the secondaries installed I'll tune using e100 with the GM sensor installed, then table blending back down to e85 watching any minor adjustments needed. Then I'm not too worried about the mix I get throughout the year.

 

 

I got my "switch plate"... Ummm... "Fabbed" up tonight. Will post pics from desktop machine later.

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Yup. You can drop in one of the Ford or GM ethanol sensors and run any mix you want provided you've tuned the range of course. You can also run staged injection between any two fuels with table switching/blending. The only caveat is that switching is always done from ms3x to ms3 injector outputs so obvious have to be batch injection on one set of injectors.

 

I plan to tune on 87 octane if I can, and once I've got the secondaries installed I'll tune using e100 with the GM sensor installed, then table blending back down to e85 watching any minor adjustments needed. Then I'm not too worried about the mix I get throughout the year.

 

 

I got my "switch plate"... Ummm... "Fabbed" up tonight. Will post pics from desktop machine later.

 

Nice! Where would you source E100? "E85" can range anywhere from about E50-E80 throughout the year, FWIW.

 

Looks like your attachment didn't work...

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Not sure if the image is fixed, but it seems to be a public link on my end.

 

For E100 (or E99.5) you can use isopropyl alcohol for about $20/gal. A bit pricey, but still cheaper than some of the fancier race gases. And the ever-ranging pump mix of E"85" is exactly why one should employ the flex fuel sensor into any eXX build.

 

Got my switch panel cleaned up a bit last night. Ready to start wiring it.

 

IMG_20160412_223354.jpg

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Nicely done!

 

So you're telling me that you'll be running your car consistently on rubbing alcohol or is it a one-time thing just to see what it makes?

 

That's why I was curious if MS3 could do flex-fuel. Sounds like you're all set! Looking forward to see the results, doesn't seem like Z-guys really go for E85 much. That stuff is the best bang-for-the-buck mod you can make on a forced-induction engine IMO.

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I'll tune using e100 with the GM sensor installed, then table blending back down to e85 watching any minor adjustments needed

 

Just a few gallons to get a base fuel and spark table set.

 

By having these baselines to go all the way from E10 87RON to E100 I'll have the extreme windows that will never be touched. And having the flex fuel sensor I'll be able to get a readout of current EXX mix, so once I like my E100 table I can develop a E50 table my mixing it down. In either case it won't matter a TON as I'll only be running ethanol under boosted conditions and will be shooting for fairly rich AFRs. A ballpark tune should happen quickly when I get to that point.

 

Going to see if I can get my switches wired tonight, as the weekend is filling up with family activities.

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Isopropyl alcohol and ethanol shouldn't be comparable in combustion terms, as an "E" ratio fuel.   Three carbons versus two.  Is that somebody's guess, along the same lines that people poison themselves with to get a buzz, or is there some basis?

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Isopropyl alcohol and ethanol shouldn't be comparable in combustion terms, as an "E" ratio fuel.   Three carbons versus two.  Is that somebody's guess, along the same lines that people poison themselves with to get a buzz, or is there some basis?

Isopropyl is much closer to ethanol than methanol, but you're right, it's not "the same".

 

This actually prompted me to do some extra research since it'd been a while that I'd looked at stuff, so thank you.

 

The "90%" rubbing alcohol tends to be about 65-75% ethanol combined with a healthy 20% methanol and some other stuff. 

The "99%" isopropyl is as it sounds, nearly pure alcohol that's non-consumable by nature.

 

The stoichiometric ratio of isopropyl is 11.4 as it turns out. It does have nearly identical latent energy of evaporation of ethanol though, which means it's likely to burn very similarly in use.

Stoichiometric of methanol is way down at 6.4 though, compared to ethanol (pure) at 9.0. So either I need to just tune with what I can find at the pump, or maybe mix 90% rubbing alcohol with isopropyl and see what the meter reads on the ethanol sensor. As long as I'm tuning in the peak of summer the pump mix should be fairly heavy on the ethanol mix.

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All I'm saying is not that close to mimicking 100% ethanol.  It probably gets you on the curve, but you'll be extrapolating instead of interpolating.

Right, point taken.

 

The REALLY expensive route is to just buy a case of 190 proof everclear. You can also get tax-paid 190 proof for about $500 for 4 gallons. 

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I just don't get the point of dumping rubbing alcohol into your tank, especially if you'll never run it that way.

 

Tune it for pump E85 and extrapolate your timing and fuel tables from that. Fill up and do your tuning at the end of summer when ethanol content should be highest.  Start with a few gallons of E85 in the tank and then mix in E10 to tune at lower ratios. That alone will take you at least 3-4 hours on a good dyno to get it close, and that's if you're starting from a decent base map and just doing WOT tuning. Expect the better part of a day to get part-throttle, accel enrichment, etc. mostly dialed in. With what you want to do, you'll need multiple days of dyno time to do so, and for what purpose...?

 

I've done many similar projects, just trying to give you some perspective. ;)

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Been working on the car in tiny bite size bits, and it's coming along. Both headlights are wired up now, I have some interior lights wired in, but I don't have them on a switch yet, but I'm getting close to done for the chassis wiring.

 

I didn't like the OEM horns much, so I picked up some new ones yesterday.

 

 

I really like how well this worked out with such ease.

IMG_20160427_225931.jpg

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Holy lack of update batman!

 

So July 2016, I was prepping the MN47 and removing one of the exhaust studs and it broke... A good 1/4" under the surface too. So, pull out the drill, put a hole in it. Done. Make it as big as you can comfortably get. Done. Use an easy-out to extract it and make sure to use one that is getting good depth. SNAP! MO#@)*I)$$ That sent me into a bit of a spiral and the project stalled. A few months later we were looking at buying a house, and in October 2016 we purchased and I moved the garage and such. Between family life and work I just wasn't motivated to solve the problem. I felt the best option was to just drop it off with a machinist, but local labor rates are high, and I don't want to gamble with what could be a "quick" $250 solution, or a $500 "OMG Stop spending my money and give it back!" because they couldn't remove it all after the first two hours of labor.

 

Come last summer I felt like I needed to really give it a go again, so I did what any good DIY'er would do. I worked up the motivation and spent most evenings out in the garage while the kids played out front standing over top of my head on the bench with a drill. Drill for a few minutes, check progress, sharpen bit. Drill for a few minutes. Check progress, sharpen bit. Eventually (about two weeks later), I got all my failures and tears of sadness removed from the head and was left with a not-so-round 3/8 hole. This was now a solvable problem, but I'd need a drill press or milling machine to get a TRULY round hole and not wobble another oval into the head.

 

Another few months passed, mostly due to work transitions, and eventually (about two weeks ago), I bugged someone about borrowing his bench height drill press. I went out, bought a tap and corresponding bit and went to work. It was a bit butt clenching at first but after I felt success the motivation momentum drug started taking effect. In one week I had the hole round again, tapped, plugged, new hole drilled and tapped with a fresh stud ready to go. Now the head is back on and torque, manifolds are on ready for final torque down and I'll be finishing the last of the prep work before doubling down to do the EFI.

 

Which brings me to the major changes. I'm on a big "forget all while I'm at it's" kick right now, and I'm forgoing sequential fuel and spark in the name of running. I'm just going to control the OEM dizzy directly (same as the DIYautotune write up) and run batch injection. E85 can wait. Boost control can wait. Sequential fuel can wait. Coil on plug can wait. Those are all things I'll be far more motivated to do, once I'm driving this thing again.

 

 

...pics to follow.

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Glad to see you’re back at it , Nathan.  It is amazing how a simple thing like a broken stud can cause so much anguish.  And I certainly understand how moving can interrupt a good build.  It’s been almost four years since our move with no progress on the VR.  Waiting for some dry weather so I can start framing the shop.

 

Are you still local?

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Yeah, downright SCARY how fast time flies. I can measure time since my car ran by the age of my eldest. :-(

 

But yes, still local. I'm no longer in North Vacaville though, I'm on the south side now. Feel free to PM.

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Tonight's update: got the manifolds torqued to (my) spec (oem is too low imo and prone to leaks at raised boost levels), fuel rail installed, and tossed on the j pipe for a more complete look.

 

I'd have tossed on the thermostat housing... if I could find it... Same with that damn front cover for the head. So I spent about as much time cleaning/organizing as I did working on the car. I feel like there's a box of parts hiding somewhere. Probably time well spent still.

 

20180109_200358.jpg

Edited by Gollum
Typo

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