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Gollum

Gollum's DD L28ET 75'

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Not much done tonight but I spent some time cleaning. The below pic represents a lot of work, despite a lot left to do.

 

I also started going through the first parts bin and found a lot of things I'd need, so that's hopeful. A lot of things just need to go away. Garbage bin will be full this week...

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Small update:

 

So I've found my missing cam inspection cover as well the thermostat housing. Also reconnected the coolant inlet at the rear of the head. Dizzy cap is back on, as well as the coil. I'll be using MS's built in ignition driver so I've removed the OEM ignition module from the bracket. Radiator is back in too.

 

Little by little.

 

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My wiring still isn't 100%, bit it's near enough I'm not so ashamed of it. The loom routing is a bit of a mess, and if I did it all over with $300 to blow on dedicated wiring supplies I'd have done it differently. All in all, not bad for 90% recycled supplies from donor cars (other than the diyautotune wiring which was loathsome to work with).

 

Still need to tape the driver side engine harness, as well as some of the other bits, but you get the idea.

 

One less todo before drivable.

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Car's running pretty good, despite tuning without a wideband for the tine being. I'm still regularly tidying little things up, and it's coming along.

 

I've got the wheels in my car so I can drop them at the tire shop later today with my "new" (been sitting in the garage forever) tires to be mounted. That's a huge milestone to making the thing driveable.

 

I also need to attach the hood, and I ditched the front brackets a long time ago, so hood pins it is. You might say it's because I'm cheap, but I think it's also due to just wanting to get something done and not bother with buying something, I'm making my own hood pins. I think the bolts are old LCA bolts. They're plenty strong enough in any case, and I've got all four mounted on the chassis side. Now I just need to cut them down enough so I can rest the hood in place and get some marks to drill.

 

Once tires and hood are on, I'm going to do a quick alignment, put the air dam on, and she's pretty close to road worthy!

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I'm not sure why I thought it was a good idea, but I went ahead and made my own hood pins. I doubt I "saved" money even if my time was free, since I'm likely going to go buy a kit of clips to replace my temporary clip solution. The pins themselves turned out okay, and the hood fitment is passable. My lower pin placement ended up spot on which is great since they'll take the brunt of the lifting load, but the rear's I didn't take my time with enough and I ended up putting my holes in about 1/4" or more too high (towards the windshield. This caused a lot more work than necessary getting it to fit decently, and larger holes than preferable, but I'm not sure I really care as long as it stays on tight.

 

Also spent time yesterday mounting my own tires on my wheels. Not exactly fun, but with decent manual tools it's not too painful (even the harbor freight stand isn't the worst thing in the world). Reason I ended up doing this myself is because though my tires I had already looked fantastic, had been out of the sun in a garage their whole life, and never under extreme temperatures, they were more than 6 years old (close to 10 years actually) and thus no shop in the area wanted to touch them. I don't plan on doing any competitive racing on them, or any serious street shenanigans, but they'll likely be fine for daily driving for a year or two, which is all as long as I need them to last.

 

I ordered speed bleeders because I still felt my brakes were a bit mushy and wanted to be able to bleed them myself with confidence. Boy do these things work great! I can't say enough about them. Lucky me with the S13 rear brakes I use the same bleeder on all four corners which is handy, and once installed I was able to bleed my brakes myself in about 5 minutes. Granted, the car was already on stands with all four wheels off, but you get the picture.

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So my battery still needed some work to be mounted a bit more "properly" compared to how I had it last time I was daily driving this car. My "long term" goal was to square out the passenger foot well and make a little enclosure for it with panel mount terminals. This would make it racing body legal, but also putting the weight as low as possible, while being between the wheels. I'm not a huge fan of putting the battery up high in the back, as I don't NEED more weight in the back per se, since I can always tune the front/back grip with the same measures it'd take to balance the car if I put all the weight in the back. Anyway, I'm rambling.

 

So I still had a ton of dynamat on the floorpans from a PO (I think it was hybridz member FlatBlack or it had to have been before him even maybe). I didn't want to look at even a temporary riveted or bolted in solution for a tray in the eventual battery space to be with the crap in the way. Well, so I got to removing the dynamat... and just.... yeah.

 

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Nice hole up in the top right of the image, and I have to wonder if dynamat was intended to just hide rust that someone didn't want to repair. I haven't had the car stored outside, I've never seen/had standing water in the floor... Yet... Healthy rust, growing like mold in a forgotten fridge.

 

And to add some insult to the mix, I confirmed a suspicion that my floors weren't exactly flat.

 

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And after some more grinding (flap disk) , more sound deadening removal, and more grinding (flat disk), and the some pounding, I have a more flat floor, and a heavy desire to go buy a wire wheel for the angle grinder. All my existing wire wheels are for drills or die grinders. Which, I guess I could use the die grinder with a wire wheel, I'd just be running the compressor pretty hard for a few hours to get this really cleaned up.

 

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So, I'm really tempted to wire wheel the rest of the rust away, cut and weld the minimal spots, spray on some weld-through primer, and build a temporary battery mount where I want it to end up. That "temporary" solution is likely kicking the can down a year or two at the rate I've been going this last year, but I think I'm okay with that. I'm not building this to sell, or for someone else. And I'm not going to be competing in it anytime soon. I'm going to be driving it, putting miles on it, to work, to play, etc. I'm mostly just interested in "safe" and "don't lose objects to the road through the floor" status.

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Sux.  I know the feeling all too well.  The PO of my car filled holes in the frame rails and corresponding holes in the floorboard with Great Stuff then covered them with dynamat.  He told me with a straight face that the frame rails and floor pans were "solid."   

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Well, in his defense, expanding urethane foam can be pretty "solid" stuff! :-)

 

I'm not all that upset, and it's not like I ever felt this was a completely rust free car... It's just a "well I guess this is the state of things". The front chassis ears where the hood hinges mount are all rusted out, my fenders have rust in the rocker area. and there's other mild signs of rust elsewhere. My interest in digging into the problem is low, largely because I don't have welding equipment (yet), and no interest in fixing for the sake of "pretty".

 

That said, if I'm going to work on a part of the car, I might as well do what I can while I'm in there.

Edited by Gollum

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9 hours ago, rossman said:

Sux.  I know the feeling all too well.  The PO of my car filled holes in the frame rails and corresponding holes in the floorboard with Great Stuff then covered them with dynamat.  He told me with a straight face that the frame rails and floor pans were "solid."   

 

Oh man. I thought I was alone with a PO that crazy. My PO "repaired" the floor boards with a harbor freight welder and Great Stuff in all the holes. 

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It really is hard to imagine it being MORE work to just replace the whole pan from the right edge of the faux rail to the rocker and from the firewall to the seat rail.

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There's definitely some decent pitting in other unmarked areas but they seem solid enough that I'd be happy with a rust converter and some paint. But after patching those four sections I'll have already done a fair bit of metal shaping and welding.

 

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3 hours ago, Gollum said:

It really is hard to imagine it being MORE work to just replace the whole pan

It's not really. All of those pitted areas of metal will be super thin once you grind them back to fresh metal for welding.

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Shes idling nice. I would get a wideband in there as soon as you can. If you need connectors, for coils , injectors or any of the sensors I have those in stock. 

 

With that much patch work I would go with full floors or atleast front one big patch it will look much better. How does it lookI know the 280 fuel lines run on the floor vs 240z so something to think about. How does it look behind seats?

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If the integrity of the seat mounts and frame rail is not affected by the rust, I'd patch.  Especially if you're not worried about aesthetics.  I replaced my Swiss cheese floors mainly because the rust was in all the edges of the rail underneath and the front seat mount.  I also cut the roof off so I needed the floors to be solid along with the addition of stiffening tubing.  It looks great, but it's a lot more involved than patching. 

I have a cheap flux core wire feed welder you can borrow if you'd like.  It's what I used to do my floors.

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Yeah, I need to remove my seats to be sure, but when I put them back in not that long ago I don't remember noticing any major rust. I'll likely just end up doing some patching. As far as a welder, thanks for the offer. Someone else also offered me long-term borrowing of a flux core so we'll see how that works out. I also have a neighbor willing to let me bring the car over to do some welding, but that would mean needing to have a set of patches fitting and ready. If I have a welder handy, I'm going to also go about plugging the corner light holes, maybe cleaning up the rear bumper area, etc. So having a few winter months to peck away at the problem might be ideal.

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