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  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  3. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  4. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  5. 1 point
    Back to the beginning. If you look at the wiring diagram, the reverse light circuit is tied to the Accessory bus in the fuse panel. The circuit also feeds the wiper motor. Out of the 20 amp fuse (stock) there's a Blue/Red (LR) that runs through the dash harness -> engine bay harness -> wiper motor. There is a Red (R) spliced into the LR at some point that also (stock) runs through the dash harness to the engine bay harness. Stock, the wiring to the reverse switch on the transmission comes out of the loom about the same spot the wiring to the wiper comes out and runs under the trans tunnel on the right side to the switch on the transmission. A Red/Black (RB) comes out the other side of the switch and back along the same path that the Red went out. Once it's back inside the cabin, the RB connects to the body harness and goes back as power (+12v) to the reverse lights. The lights get their ground from back under the hatch (tied to the sheet metal somewhere IIRC) In your case the red should be connected to that 20 amp fuse output that also powers the wiper motor. The black is NOT a ground (if it's coming from the other side of the reverse switch) - it should connect to the Red/Black that's going back to the reverse lights. (I would not do it that way - as it's confusing to anyone else working on the car. Black in a Datsun should always be a ground. If you can't run it RB, use R - then people will at least know it's probably power) (A switch is merely a break in a wire - it is NOT "one side hot, one side ground". So, in this case the Red/Black is just a continuation of the Red wire. The reverse switch is there so the light only comes on when the transmission is in reverse. The reverse switch breaks the wire apart when not in reverse, and "puts the wire back together" when it is in reverse.) This is a very simple part of the process. I just learned most of the above looking at the wiring diagram and remembering how the wires hook up to my transmission. (OK, I have a little stronger background in Z wiring, I admit...) But, If this is too much, you'll need to get someone else OR - like they stated above - spend a good deal of time in learning. IMO an EZWire kit will not make this process simpler but at least it will be new wire - which is always a plus... You'll still need to understand how all these components are wired - and why. The dash harness (there are actually two separate harnesses strapped together as one assembly) is mildly complex - gauges, lighting, multi-function switches, ignition, fuse panel, flashers, stop lamp, hazard switch (OK, now I'm just being an a-Hole...). How do you eat an Elephant? One bite at a time. This can be done - one step at a time.
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    I'd be a bad person to answer these questions but I think an auto '82 for $2200 is steep. I spent $1k on my donor '82 5 speed and after reading some I think I paid too much. BUT I will say the '82 head is preferred over the '83 hydraulic so I've read. Mine wasn't running and I had it totally rebuilt. I've got $9K in the rebuild but it wasn't to OEM. I had forged pistons and rods added along with just about anything else you could think of. Overkill? I'm sure. I have the I/C fitted, I still need to work out the electric cooling fans and then comes the fuel management.
  8. 1 point
    Just finished welding the adapters together, figured I'd give my review. Turned out to be relatively straight forward and simple. Only extra work required was some grinding of the inner edges so my 280z adapter would seat correctly. Definitely get the welding jig if you don't have access to a mill or lathe.
  9. 1 point
    this forum has really slowed down but I thought I'd make a brief update since it's been a while. I've been driving the car, slowly tuning the setup. You can imagine that a completely custom chassis is going to have it's own pros and cons to discover and tune. Right now just finishing up installing a new set of springs and 2-way adjustable shocks. We are adding some rock shielding to the engine back- the open wheel wells are cool looking but invite all kinds of rocks into the engine bay. Also working on adding a wing to the rear for better aero.
  10. 1 point
    Yes they were... were as in I made a 3 foot breaker bar and that did the trick. Loud snap and I thought I broke the head off the bolt but once got about a quarter turn they were loose and hit them with the impact and came off / out no problem. Installed the new Mount easily and strap easily. Thanks for the replies and info.
  11. 1 point
    I come back every time I'm banned...with this year meaning of the prior three months I've only been on FB maybe a total of 14 days. They are seriously PC and nobody can take a joke. They are also EXTREMELY Eurocentric-Communo/Socialists and anything that deals with anti-communist or anti-socialist in any way will get you scoped and flushed. They also are Anti-Goodwin, with the mere mention of Adolph, or even his face in a humorous meme poking fun at his stupidity will get you banned for 30 days. Then, while you're gone, apparently they assign some snowflake to comb through all your posts and start tagging ANYTHING that they NOW deem offensive. The Best one was last year they tried to ban me for a post that showed up in one of the FB "7 Years Ago Today" auto-posts... Go ahead and share it and BOOM BAN! not even 15 seconds. "Hey, YOU GUYS SENT IT TO ME!" Whiskey Tango Foxtrot??? The upside is, I have a lot more time to do other things. For the first time in years my Quicken is up-to-date with proper balances on ALL the accounts!
  12. 1 point
    Here's the latest on the bracket saga. I tried three sets sourced by Summit Racing, and when the third set (made by Grove) was going to hit stuff, I bit the bullet and fabricated (actually, I modified the last set I got). The folks at Summit were super about the returns, but when the third set didn't work, I felt embarrassed. After all, three times! I used 1/4-inch aluminum plate to make the modified parts, and used as many parts as I could of Grove's stuff. The compressor is off now, but with both in place, I measured and measured, and I am now certain--well, almost certain--that these will work. Here are some photos.
  13. 1 point
    Do you access to a good flaring tool? If not consider something like this,https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-pro-brake-tubing-flaring-tool-with-45-and-37-degree-die-set.html It's the best flaring tool I've ever used and if you don't think you'll ever use it again you can sell it on Craigs and get a big chunk of your money back. The one I bought has done complete brake lines on four Z's now and still shows no wear.
  14. 1 point
    Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    thanks D9inger!!! that is one bueatiful engine.
  17. 1 point
    Some after market master cylinders do not have the large reservoir in front. As long as the master cylinder is correct in all other aspects then it doesn't matter. You can always swap the front reservoir from the old master cylinder onto the new one for a "stock" appearance.
  18. 1 point
    Hopefully you don't mind me adding my experience today. Didn't use anything except the saturn vue column and a 77 280z column. I figured a few more pictures of different setups in the thread is always helpful. I cut down the saturn telescoping joint so it would fully collapse and removed the thicker bottom portion of the female portion as well as turning it down about 1mm so it could pass through the datsun bearing at the firewall. Making it collapse fully let me just expand it to whatever length I needed without worrying about measuring the section behind the power steering motor. Then I could weld the original u-joint to the saturn telescoping joint, and pass the whole thing through the original firewall mount after grinding down the welds. Because the power steering motor was free in the rear, it wasn't as solid as I would like. Particularly the steering wheel could have tilted up because it was only held in with the two mounting screws under the dash. So I added an extra brace that seemed to stiffen it up nicely. Washers are a little sloppy I know, but it works and lets me adjust tension. All back together, doesn't stick out too much. I did remove the control box and bolted it to a thick aluminum plate as a heatsink under the dash. Seems to work just fine, haven't had a chance to drive it, I'll update tomorrow.
  19. 1 point
    @calZ I just saw that thread on the body kit forum ha! I searched on google but it didn't pull that up, thanks for sharing that! @Bartman that looks pretty slick! post up pics when you're done!
  20. 1 point
    At $800 +shipping across the country, that's still a little rich for my blood. I'm still going to try and doctor the current Accu Form skin, it's just going to take a little more work than I'd thought. I did discover there is a local West Marine so I was able to pick up some g/flex and some 105/207 resin/ hardener for the skin. I went over everything with 80 grit and flame treated before applying the g/flex. Side note: I went with the 655 vs the 650 because it specifically mentioned hard to bond plastics. It is definitely more of a gel than most of the epoxies I've used. It says it can be used to fill voids I think up to .5" without needing to be reinforced. I tried laying in some glass strand just for more grip for the upper layers and it really doesn't wet out very well. BUT (!) when it dries - this stuff isn't going anywhere. That's as far as I got yesterday. I've still got to re-sand it and lay some more glass on the back side to reinforced around the gauges, then I can move on to the top and figure out the mounting. I'll get some pictures up of the process.
  21. 1 point
    Sometimes people discover that the rear caliper bleed screw hole is not actually the highest point when installed after these conversions, because they're not designed for Z cars. It's close but still has a spot for an air bubble. They have to unbolt the caliper and rotate it so that the channel to the bleed port really is the highest point. They bleed the brakes with the caliper loose, then rotate it back and bolt it down when they're done. Be the bubble.
  22. 1 point
    I don't know a ton. Previous owner had it for 10 years. Didn't drive it much. Kept it fairly clean. Owner before that was in TX. Very little scale rust. Clean car. It's been swapped to an L28. Has round top SUs. 5 speed trans. Definitely some work on it here and there, but fairly stock, original. I've changed the oil and plugs. I'm going to do trans and rear end fluids asap as well. I drove it home from the seller, 90 miles. Mostly back country roads and some highway. It'll do 70+ no problem. But it doesn't FEEL great. For a beautifully running 73, I'm happy to far. I got a crazy deal on it, $4500. Been a dream car since I was a kid. So I couldn't be happier.
  23. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  24. 1 point
    All my suspension clunking is gone. The car is extremely solid now. The steering is a lot more reactive also. Overall I can't wait to try it out on the 21st at Buttonwillow. Also started the process of rebuilding an SR trans and and just waiting on a machined L series bellhousing right now from Godzilla Raceworks
  25. 1 point
    I appreciate the review of the brake pad materials. I'm curious why you have not gone to a vented front rotor? That's the main reason I am changing from stock S30 brakes, as I like to drive road courses and brake cooling seems to be important. My setup will be 280ZX front calipers with turned down Z31 front rotors and Maxima rear calipers with late S130 rotors; I am shooting for a 280ZX-type brake system, so I will also swap in the 15/16 MC and late S130 prop valve. I would like to report results this summer, but there is so much to do on the car...
  26. 1 point
    1978 280Z Turbo Rebuilt L28ET 300ZX ECU reprogrammed by Jim Wolf Technologies- 91 Octane only Mustang Cobra Mass Air Flow Sensor 4-Piston toyota caliper front Disc brakes. Rear has original brakes. 5-Speed tranny with R-200 rear Tokicos 5-way adjustable shocks Front Mount intercooler Manual Boost Controller Turbo timer Reupholstered seats All new window seals Newer carpet Alpine Stereo -clean title Asking $16,000 OBO The headlight/wiper switch and Speedometer are not working speedometer stuck @85,xxx. No head liner. No A/C 323 717 Fifty Eight Forty. Text me if you have any offers or questions
  27. 1 point
    I am working on putting a passenger seat in my race car. Driver's side is on a slider and the mount on that side is totally different but thought I'd share how this non-adjustable pass side is going in. First thing was removal of the stock mount. I had done this on the driver's side 10 years ago or so and remembered it being a big PITA. I did not remember wrong. I really hate trying to get all the spot welds loose. I tried a spot weld cutter and ruined it after successfully cutting about 10 spot welds. Unfortunately there are a lot more than 10 spot welds holding the stock mounts in. After that I tried air saws and other tools, but finally ended up with the tool I hate (and use) the most: 4.5" angle grinder. I used a cutoff wheel and hacked the stock mounts out and ground down as much of what was left as I could. Pro tip: I had been using ear plugs but figured out I could use my new bluetooth over ear headphones to listen to music and podcasts, and I could hear my phone ringing and customers on my website chatting with me, etc. Huge upgrade. I cut the stock mounts out and stuck the seat on the brackets in the car to figure out where the seat mount would be fore/aft. Then I measured from the seam in the floor behind the seats to where the seat bracket would be. I drew a line on the floor where the rear of the rear mount tube would be, and another one 2" in front of that. I had already figured out that there was going to be 6 1/8" between the front and back tubes, so I measured another 6 1/8" and drew another line across and another one 2" in front of that. So now I've got 4 lines across the floor marking where the front and back of each tube would be. Then I cut long strips of 2" tall cardboard, and trimmed them to match the contour of the floor. I then traced them onto the 2x2 tubes and used an angle grinder with cutoff wheel to shape the ends of the tube. Getting the front and back templates lined up correctly is kind of a pain because the trans tunnel isn't straight, so line them up on the outside where they hit the rocker. and leave a little extra on and then grind to fit. On the driver's side I cut into the bottom of the mount tubes to clear the little hump in the middle of the floor. On this side I cut the hump in the floor. I think cutting the hump is easier. After the tubes were cut to shape and fit reasonably close to the contour of the floor, I welded in two 6 1/8" tubes to connect the two and spaced them to fit right where the subframe connectors are. Next I needed to locate the seat laterally. I put the mount in the car and set the seat on its brackets on top of the mount, and figured out where I wanted the seat, then drew lines on either side of the brackets. Knowing where the nuts needed to be to bolt the seat in, I cut square holes in the top of the tube. Then I cut 2 x 2 pieces of .100" sheet and welded nuts to them to bolt the seat brackets to. After that I bolted the 2x2 plates with nuts to the seat brackets and set them on top of the mount and tack welded them in place. I unbolted the seat and brackets and finished welding the plates in. Next I'll weld the top ends of the tube to the rocker and the trans tunnel. I'll stitch the two longitudinal tubes to the subframe connectors. I used a LOT of heat on the driver's side and melted through the floor to get good penetration into the SFCs. My floor was pretty bashed up when I got this car, so the floor doesn't fit perfectly on the bottom of the 2x2 tubing. Plan there is to beat the floor up to the tubing after the mounts are welded on the ends, then stitch across the front and back of the tubing to attach the tubes to the floor. That's today's project. The mount on the driver's side was as long as the slider for the seat, so more like 12". Like I said before, much different on that side.
  28. 1 point
    For my '71, I had the local high school metal shop cut one out on their plasma cutter. I gave them a pattern traced from the later style boot, including the screw holes. A real life project for the students and no cost, or skill required, for me. Win/Win! Dennis
  29. 1 point
    On my '71, I cut a slight arch out of the console where the shift lever hit. When the leather/vinyl shift lever boot is in place, the cutout is not seen. Dennis
  30. 1 point
    Hello HybridZ, just joined and wanted to say hi as i have some big plans for my 280z. Long story short, i currently own a fully build evo8, LS swapped FD RX7, and recently got into the S30 life. i had a 260z that i was going to fully restore, then found a 280z that fit my needs perfectly. Anyways, i just wanted to say hello and i am looking forward to all your support as im certainly new in the classic car world VIdeos Buying my 260z Buying my 280z 280z overview I put my 280z on a dyno
  31. 1 point
    1975 2 seater with what we call over here the Californian floor pans due to the provision of a bulge for the cat converter of the day and a very irregular metal pressing check back when I have the pans this isn’t as hard as it looks
  32. 1 point
    I have a pair available. If you are interested email me at zedsn@hotmail.com
  33. 1 point
    I'm replacing most everything on my Z, and even trying to go as cheap as possible on everything, and using lots of junk yard parts and doing 100% of the labor myself, I still can't find a way to spend less then 15k. A much better way to do a "full" upgrade, would be to upgrade everything else that isn't engine related first (brakes, suspension, chassis strengthening, seats, paint, bodykit?, etc) before you touch the engine. As soon as the engine comes out, you'll want to upgrade everything "while you're there". At this point, just add 3-5 years onto whatever time budget you gave yourself unless you're one of those crazy singular focus ultra driven workhorses that apparently has no other hobbies. Man I'm jealous of those people. There's an Australian guy on youtube right who documented pretty much every aspect of his Z restoration. You might want to give his damn near 90 videos a watch and see if that's what you want to do. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_vb_SJctymCkwnF6sAwDg
  34. 1 point
    Dutchman Axles used to be a local company, then moved to Idaho. They're much smaller then Mosier, but big enough to not screw it up when you explain what you want.
  35. 1 point
    Not much to report. It’s been a rough year in far NorCal. Record fires last summer, and record snow this winter. Lost tress and fencing around the property and had to shut down the office a few days without power anywhere. Hoping and praying for an un-eventful weather pattern for spring and summer with plenty of opportunity to run the Z.
  36. 1 point
    Motor is rated for 120 hp 179 ft.lbs peak. I should get somewhat better acceleration around town than the stock L28 (particularly since I get peak torque now from 0-3500 RPM), but with a reduced top speed. Continuous power output is only ~40hp, so based on that and gearing/drag calcs I've found online puts top speed around 90-100 mph (this car has the 5-speed transmission), which IMO is plenty fast for a 40 year old tin-can of a car. I expect around 90-100 miles of range out of this once everything is dialed in (suspension leveled out, front aero cleaned up, etc).
  37. 1 point
    Searching facebook never works that well for me. I love forums.
  38. 1 point
    Thx to nice people on this forum, I found wat i needed! John Meyer you rock. Thx again John. Joost
  39. 1 point
    Went digging in the junkyard today with the CV spider in my pocket. Turns out the 02 explorer has the same diameter shaft ends... but courser splines. The good news is its a solid heat treated shaft and its the same thickness its whole length, necking down only for the splines. I also called moser and talked to them about sending in a core shaft and paying for two pairs of CV axle spline service and they're happy to do it so long as they look everything over and it seams like it works. Cutting the heat treating off the hollow shafts just wasn't sitting well with me. I also discovered that the two left shafts are different on the ends in diameter and one had a slightly smaller cv joint pair... I'm guessing i got one v8 shaft and the other from a v6 car. Both are splined the same into the housing and at the hubs... but one is stronger than the other with bigger cv joints. The left and right v8 shaft have the same size cv joints... its just the spare left shaft had some differences. Going back to the junkyard tomorrow to compare my cv joint to the explorer outer cv. If they are the same internally i plan on building a hybrid cv. But if they're different I'll pay for 2 pairs of spline service and know that I'll never have to worry about the strength of those shafts...
  40. 1 point
    Just getting going on my 260Z rocket bunny build. Starting with a really clean 74' 260 that I picked up in Atlanta. Supposedly sat in a barn for 32 years, and it looked like it probably did. I'm installing a rocket bunny kit and doing a custom airlift performance air bag suspension. I'm documenting the build as I go, you can check it out here if you are interested.
  41. 1 point
    "the nipple won't stop bleeding" doesn't make sense. What do you mean? Maybe you could rephrase the question. It does sound painful though...
  42. 1 point
    Depends what you want. I like 16s and can confirm that with narrow coilover conversion RBR 16x8 +10 fit with stock arches and 225 tyres, anything that brings the wheel further to the outside of the car than this could potentially lead to the need to run 215s although you may get way with a 0 offset. Usually more choice in 15" by the way but I prefer 16" and need it to clear my brakes. Good tip, don't use the forum search, use google using hybridz.org at the start, always gets better results. I searched when I was a newbie and it took a lot of time, but the answers are there. Just make sure to check more than 1 source, ideally more than two.
  43. 1 point
    Got a new batch of flanges all done. Some of the costs went up marginally unfortunately. Now $205 Shipped and request you pay via friends/family to cut down on my fees. Jig rental cost down to $20 from $30 however. Total $225 with Jig rental, plus you ship jig to next user.
  44. 1 point
    In case it hasn't already been posted in this forum, there's now a Facebook group for GTO replica owners and fans: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GTORR/
  45. 1 point
    Excellent on getting the turn signals working! Now on to your headlights. Here is a basic troubleshoots guide I put together for someone else, I believe you have done much of this but take a moment to review it to see if anything in it helps. Here’s a sorta step by step process for checking. 1) Start by checking the Engine bay main fusible links connections. The one closest to the fender (outer) and the front (away from the firewall) is the one that provides power to the headlight switch. These often get tarnished or corroded at the Blade connectors. Once these are cleaned and you’ve verified power on each side of the connection then move to the column. 2) Check the large White/red wire at the column; this is power from the main fusible links. This is where power enters your switch. When the switch is turned on, power exits the switch to the fuse box by way of the large Red wire with the bullet connection. At the fuse box the power is split into 2 circuits, one for each headlight. 3) Check for power at the two headlight fuses and ensure the fuses to the fuse-box connections are clean and good. 4) Since both headlights are affected, it’s not likely that these two separate power-circuits to the headlight bulbs are the issue. 5) The headlights share two common ground circuits, one for Low beam & one for High beam. Since both high & low beams are affected it is not likely these individual ground circuits from headlights back to the Turn Signal switch (High/Low selector). 6) There is a wire at the column that connects the Turn signal switch (High/Low selector) to the Headlight combo switch. Check that connection; this is where the ground circuit routes to the Head Light switch, which then continues out the large Black wire with the Blade connector to ground. There is no factory relay in the headlight circuit. There are aftermarket kits or people modify to add a relay. If yours has this mod. then the wiring and relay for this could be a suspect as well.
  46. 1 point
    This is our second Z. We had an early 260Z which we sold in Sept. It was an numbers matching original L26 and 4 speed
  47. 1 point
    A little background info: car was stock when I bought it from NC, with 80k on engine frame rails replaced undercoating redone floor pans replaced tub scraped, repainted, dynamat l28e replaced with rb20det rb20det with new intake manifold, exhaust manifold (soon to be replaced turbo, injectors, coils) custom exhaust I'm in the process of putting the engine back together and then it is getting dropped back in. Then will put in some coil overs, even though bags would be INSANE on this car. Then tires, wheels, some small other changes, as well as putting in a nice interior. I'm hoping this car will be up and running for Spring time!! I can't wait to rip my baby around(:
  48. 1 point
    I found some interesting parameters in the Tunerstudio software about launch control and flat shifting which got me thinking and consequently the megasquirt case hasn’t stayed assembled for long! I’ve build a protective circuit on the prototyping area to ground a 5v signal from JS11 leg of the CPU. This will be used to trigger launch control and flat shifting functions. I don’t know how this will function with the SU carbs as the MS1 is only controlling ignition. I suspect backfiring will ensue! I’ll have to build a clutch switch if launch control passes testing. I want the car to be about function not form. If the launch control doesn’t prove useful, I’ll bin it. Oh and the wiring loom of less than ten wires is also complete……
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    A large rubber mallet(like something you would have seen in Looney Tunes Acme style), and some strong legs is all we had to straighten the passenger side out in mine. I braced myself against the top of the door threshold for short bursts while my buddy welded the pans down to get them perfect. A harbor freight dolly set also comes in handy to get any small bumps out one your done. Thanks guys, I dont really have much to offer Hybridz these days so its the least I can do until I can make a donation. Ray
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