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  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  3. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  4. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  5. 1 point
    Sometimes people discover that the rear caliper bleed screw hole is not actually the highest point when installed after these conversions, because they're not designed for Z cars. It's close but still has a spot for an air bubble. They have to unbolt the caliper and rotate it so that the channel to the bleed port really is the highest point. They bleed the brakes with the caliper loose, then rotate it back and bolt it down when they're done. Be the bubble.
  6. 1 point
    Sounds more like they were just bad shocks/inserts from the beginning, or they were actually the wrong ones for the car. The oil in the strut tube would have had no effect. It's on the outside of the shock body. It doesn't move at all as the suspension moves. Just a pool of oil, sitting there, doing nothing. KYB makes a good product. Good luck.
  7. 1 point
    Will be interesting to see how this changes things
  8. 1 point
    If the rear cylinders were leaking there would be fluid. Did you see any? Sounds more like a bad MC. The front and rear systems are stacked, in series. If one seal fails the pedal will drop that distance until the second one catches. Your new MC might fix it. Here's a drawing, they're all the same. The right seal contains the fluid, the other two create pressure. You can see how you can lose one but keep pressure on the other end.
  9. 1 point
    Thanks! A 240 tank would work fine too because I'm 85% sure I'm going to put a surge tank in anyway so having the baffles or larger flow may not be as necessary. It has been a challenge but we must soldier on. I'm open to options so I'll check them out. I did not. I think people with carbed cars like them because they come baffled from the factory so it's easier to convert to EFI.
  10. 1 point
    The links jhm & calZ are great. For a street car what I have found is that if you strengthen the frame rails then do some basic strut bars the car is plenty stiff for your needs and if you want to a bit more then do some further bars just for the towers; this will avoid needing cage. If you do want to race you would just need a hoop but for street there is no need. I added some pics of my rails and others have done similar versions. I did another 240Z where we found great boxed rails that were thinner and fully boxed so we just welded that on the bottom and eliminated welding inside the car; easier and similar result. This way your car is more street and others driving with you will appreciate not being in a cage. I own a more caged Z as well but when you get older you will find women often do not want to be in a caged car, maybe just a hoop but nothing more...
  11. 1 point
    Good catch. Thank you for pointing that out.
  12. 1 point
    All my suspension clunking is gone. The car is extremely solid now. The steering is a lot more reactive also. Overall I can't wait to try it out on the 21st at Buttonwillow. Also started the process of rebuilding an SR trans and and just waiting on a machined L series bellhousing right now from Godzilla Raceworks
  13. 1 point
    Poly bushings on the compression rod? You'll need to replace the poly bushing on the back side with a rubber bushing - otherwise you'll probably break the compression rod. Ask me how I know... There are a fair number of thread posts regarding the issue.
  14. 1 point
    1978 280Z Turbo Rebuilt L28ET 300ZX ECU reprogrammed by Jim Wolf Technologies- 91 Octane only Mustang Cobra Mass Air Flow Sensor 4-Piston toyota caliper front Disc brakes. Rear has original brakes. 5-Speed tranny with R-200 rear Tokicos 5-way adjustable shocks Front Mount intercooler Manual Boost Controller Turbo timer Reupholstered seats All new window seals Newer carpet Alpine Stereo -clean title Asking $16,000 OBO The headlight/wiper switch and Speedometer are not working speedometer stuck @85,xxx. No head liner. No A/C 323 717 Fifty Eight Forty. Text me if you have any offers or questions
  15. 1 point
    I am working on putting a passenger seat in my race car. Driver's side is on a slider and the mount on that side is totally different but thought I'd share how this non-adjustable pass side is going in. First thing was removal of the stock mount. I had done this on the driver's side 10 years ago or so and remembered it being a big PITA. I did not remember wrong. I really hate trying to get all the spot welds loose. I tried a spot weld cutter and ruined it after successfully cutting about 10 spot welds. Unfortunately there are a lot more than 10 spot welds holding the stock mounts in. After that I tried air saws and other tools, but finally ended up with the tool I hate (and use) the most: 4.5" angle grinder. I used a cutoff wheel and hacked the stock mounts out and ground down as much of what was left as I could. Pro tip: I had been using ear plugs but figured out I could use my new bluetooth over ear headphones to listen to music and podcasts, and I could hear my phone ringing and customers on my website chatting with me, etc. Huge upgrade. I cut the stock mounts out and stuck the seat on the brackets in the car to figure out where the seat mount would be fore/aft. Then I measured from the seam in the floor behind the seats to where the seat bracket would be. I drew a line on the floor where the rear of the rear mount tube would be, and another one 2" in front of that. I had already figured out that there was going to be 6 1/8" between the front and back tubes, so I measured another 6 1/8" and drew another line across and another one 2" in front of that. So now I've got 4 lines across the floor marking where the front and back of each tube would be. Then I cut long strips of 2" tall cardboard, and trimmed them to match the contour of the floor. I then traced them onto the 2x2 tubes and used an angle grinder with cutoff wheel to shape the ends of the tube. Getting the front and back templates lined up correctly is kind of a pain because the trans tunnel isn't straight, so line them up on the outside where they hit the rocker. and leave a little extra on and then grind to fit. On the driver's side I cut into the bottom of the mount tubes to clear the little hump in the middle of the floor. On this side I cut the hump in the floor. I think cutting the hump is easier. After the tubes were cut to shape and fit reasonably close to the contour of the floor, I welded in two 6 1/8" tubes to connect the two and spaced them to fit right where the subframe connectors are. Next I needed to locate the seat laterally. I put the mount in the car and set the seat on its brackets on top of the mount, and figured out where I wanted the seat, then drew lines on either side of the brackets. Knowing where the nuts needed to be to bolt the seat in, I cut square holes in the top of the tube. Then I cut 2 x 2 pieces of .100" sheet and welded nuts to them to bolt the seat brackets to. After that I bolted the 2x2 plates with nuts to the seat brackets and set them on top of the mount and tack welded them in place. I unbolted the seat and brackets and finished welding the plates in. Next I'll weld the top ends of the tube to the rocker and the trans tunnel. I'll stitch the two longitudinal tubes to the subframe connectors. I used a LOT of heat on the driver's side and melted through the floor to get good penetration into the SFCs. My floor was pretty bashed up when I got this car, so the floor doesn't fit perfectly on the bottom of the 2x2 tubing. Plan there is to beat the floor up to the tubing after the mounts are welded on the ends, then stitch across the front and back of the tubing to attach the tubes to the floor. That's today's project. The mount on the driver's side was as long as the slider for the seat, so more like 12". Like I said before, much different on that side.
  16. 1 point
    The current prototype... modified to use 5/8" bolts directly, without the sleeves on the Z31 mount, this saves some cost.
  17. 1 point
    That is weird. You could release the three bent over clips (picture below) and pull the axles, leaving the sealing plate behind. Maybe you'll find something odd. Maybe they fastened the sealing plate on then assembled the CV afterward. People do strange things, like they did on your inboard CV. I posted a link to where my earlier picture came from that showed a source for the axles. They were used on 2+2 280ZX's or turbo 280ZX's. They're hard to find and sometimes the aftermarket parts are different. If you find one at a parts store take your old one to compare lengths. https://picclick.com/2x-CV-Joint-Axle-Assembly-Rear-Fits Datsun-280ZX-253130612896.html
  18. 1 point
    It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
  19. 1 point
    Hello HybridZ, just joined and wanted to say hi as i have some big plans for my 280z. Long story short, i currently own a fully build evo8, LS swapped FD RX7, and recently got into the S30 life. i had a 260z that i was going to fully restore, then found a 280z that fit my needs perfectly. Anyways, i just wanted to say hello and i am looking forward to all your support as im certainly new in the classic car world VIdeos Buying my 260z Buying my 280z 280z overview I put my 280z on a dyno
  20. 1 point
    1975 2 seater with what we call over here the Californian floor pans due to the provision of a bulge for the cat converter of the day and a very irregular metal pressing check back when I have the pans this isn’t as hard as it looks
  21. 1 point
    I'm replacing most everything on my Z, and even trying to go as cheap as possible on everything, and using lots of junk yard parts and doing 100% of the labor myself, I still can't find a way to spend less then 15k. A much better way to do a "full" upgrade, would be to upgrade everything else that isn't engine related first (brakes, suspension, chassis strengthening, seats, paint, bodykit?, etc) before you touch the engine. As soon as the engine comes out, you'll want to upgrade everything "while you're there". At this point, just add 3-5 years onto whatever time budget you gave yourself unless you're one of those crazy singular focus ultra driven workhorses that apparently has no other hobbies. Man I'm jealous of those people. There's an Australian guy on youtube right who documented pretty much every aspect of his Z restoration. You might want to give his damn near 90 videos a watch and see if that's what you want to do. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_vb_SJctymCkwnF6sAwDg
  22. 1 point
    I honestly think these parts are pure bling....which is ok....but I don't see any performance improvement they would provide at all.... It seems to me there would be more benefit if they designed a part that tied together the rear control arm bushings, since they sit out somewhat cantilevered away from the body, I could see where there would be relative movement between them when loads are introduced. Even then, the benefit would be minimal, since the TTT conversion already has the "dog bone" tying them together. It would primarily be lateral movement rather than fore and aft movement, and these TTT parts seem designed only to address the fore and aft. As someone else mentioned, the control arm bushing mounts are tied pretty solidly together fore and aft by the control arms themselves. I think TTT knows that if they crank out cool, machined, anodized aluminum parts that bolt right into place, people are going to buy them just for the bling alone....without really thinking through whether there will be actual performance benefit. IMHO, these parts are a perfect example of that. I could see some appeal if the replacement front cross-member was at least designed to facilitate a dual exhaust....but it isn't.
  23. 1 point
    Lol yeah, I assumed as much. Figured on that first compression/decompression plastic ones would pop fairly quickly.
  24. 1 point
    Not much to report. It’s been a rough year in far NorCal. Record fires last summer, and record snow this winter. Lost tress and fencing around the property and had to shut down the office a few days without power anywhere. Hoping and praying for an un-eventful weather pattern for spring and summer with plenty of opportunity to run the Z.
  25. 1 point
    I used the eastwood on my car. It has the consistency of water, so cover under the car when you spray it because it will start coming out of all the holes, seams, cracks, etc.
  26. 1 point
    Thanks for the feedback! 'Plug and play' is definitely the goal here. Re-engineer as little as possible. Good news is that the STI diffs are getting cheaper. They've gone down a couple hundred from when I sourced one for my 510 a few years ago. I'd run the same setup for my 280z but I'm working on a potential R200 solution instead. If I understand your question, the OEM STI inner housing is not swap-compatible with the axle I source. I tried several ideas with no luck. The R180 STI stubs are welded onto the CV housing in 3 different locations. One weld along the entire perimeter of the stub's flange, three .4" plug welds through the flange into recessed pockets within the housing, and finally one large plug weld on the underside of the flange through the center of the housing. It's not coming off.
  27. 1 point
    Don't do this. Have patience, and spend more money (if necessary, vastly more money!) on a car with fewer problems. Otherwise you'll spend 5 years doing rust-repairs, 5 more years doing structural reinforcement, and 5 more years nursing your wounds after you realize in year 11 that new rust has already formed where you had replaced the old. Alternatively - and it sorely pains me to say this - look for a less rare, less rust-prone vehicle of comparable low weight... such as a Mazda Miata.
  28. 1 point
    Mpg depends largely on engine management: carburetor vs. fuel injection, camshaft profile and so forth. 20 mpg should be readily attainable even with a more aggressive engine build. However, truly high efficiency, in the sense of a modern sports car, will be hard to attain - even with the 240Z's weight advantages. The reason is lousy drag coefficient... the bane of good highway mileage. To answer your questions: 1. Do as little as possible, at least initially! Complete the swap, get the engine running and the car sorted out. Engine mods can come later. 2. This is entirely subjective and situational. So enterprising drag-racers are pushing 500-700 hp (or more!) without molesting the "stock" look. 3. Never, ever ever install a non-overdrive transmission in a "daily driver" Z! Your application is screaming for a T5. 4. Initially, do nothing. Between your relatively weak stock 350 and the stock wheels/tires, the R180 differential in your 240Z should be adequate. Later you can swap in the much stronger R200. Search the "drivetrain FAQ" for model years/varieties from which to swap the R200. The #1 discriminator between failure and success, is the condition of the Z that's about to become the swap candidate. Rust? Overall condition? How is the suspension? The brakes? Do things work in general? Are bits falling off? Rubber? Plastic? Doors close properly? Dents/body damage? Electrical systems? You're about to do an engine swap. Don't also make it a restoration. The #2 discriminator is falling into the "while I'm at it" malaise. Do as little as possible! Laziness is always its own reward, but sometimes it's also this best route to quick and definitive success. This is one such instance. Be strategically lazy!
  29. 1 point
    So I'm happy with the design, unfortunately this part of my project is on the back burner for the moment. Focusing on getting my engine back in and running. But I'm super happy with preliminary testing. The plan for now is going to be to print them in ABS, finish them with acetone smooth and regular sanding, then mount them up.
  30. 1 point
    I can tell you that the reinforcement in the doors adds 10lbs per door. I'm not sure that the bumper reinforcement stuff weights quite that much, based on a rough estimate of the square inches of metal, and the weight per square inch based on the thickness of the metal. I'd guess more like 15-20lbs per end. Could be wrong. Other areas of the chassis where early 280Zs have extra weight are the front frame rails, which, IIRC, have a reinforcement on the inside, the lower rad support, the rear strut towers, subframes under the floor, lower rear quarters, various bracketry, and likely a handful of places where you can't see that something's been added. Later 280Zs have even more reinforcement, notably in the door jamb area, and the spare tire well/gas tank area. John C has a few posts on the differences, and I believe he mentioned some additional metal in the roof structure as well, although I'm not sure if that was all 280Zs or just later ones. The series one shells do use thinner metal, I checked a few areas with a micrometer, and compared between my early '71 and '76 280z, as well as a few pieces from a '72 240z. the early '71 sheet metal came in around 0.9mm, whereas the later sheet metal came in slightly thicker at about 1mm. I believe (I'd have to look it up to be sure) that John C has also said that the early 240Zs and later 280Zs are 300lbs difference, and the late 240Zs and early 280Zs are 100lbs difference.
  31. 1 point
    An example of what to avoid... the "AC" axles. It'll be on the tag, but this seller put it on the shaft as well.
  32. 1 point
    Really cool. Love it. Never seen that swap before.
  33. 1 point
    Just getting going on my 260Z rocket bunny build. Starting with a really clean 74' 260 that I picked up in Atlanta. Supposedly sat in a barn for 32 years, and it looked like it probably did. I'm installing a rocket bunny kit and doing a custom airlift performance air bag suspension. I'm documenting the build as I go, you can check it out here if you are interested.
  34. 1 point
    Thanks! I looked into that at one point, too, with the swp but they all seemed to mount too far out and would either hit the inner fender well or not clear the hood. This bracket kit for the lwp is pretty simple, looks clean, and worked well with my mostly stock wiring.
  35. 1 point
    Another tip when measuring for brake lines....if possible, add a couple extra inches to allow for the extra suspension travel when you drop the strut and control arms to swap springs/shocks/etc. Having a little extra length on the brake flex lines makes this job so much easier, especially on the fronts.
  36. 1 point
    Seems like threads should require moving to the FAQ by a mod though... But yeah, the post was curious. Seemed almost spam-like. "Dude, your answer is in your question".
  37. 1 point
    Got a new batch of flanges all done. Some of the costs went up marginally unfortunately. Now $205 Shipped and request you pay via friends/family to cut down on my fees. Jig rental cost down to $20 from $30 however. Total $225 with Jig rental, plus you ship jig to next user.
  38. 1 point
    No. Had bought one, sold it. Now looking for another.
  39. 1 point
    In case it hasn't already been posted in this forum, there's now a Facebook group for GTO replica owners and fans: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GTORR/
  40. 1 point
    Have you read these yet? https://forums.hybridz.org/topic/38592-brake-balance-faq/ https://forums.hybridz.org/topic/38499-brake-upgrade-faq/ Well from personal experience I have done this set up and the front and rear brakes can not be balanced even with an adjustable proportioning valve. They work okay but this system is overly front biased resulting in the car pitching forward because the front brakes are overloaded and the rears aren't doing enough work. A braking system has to be engineered for the car, I think if you put the stock brakes back into perfect working order and get a set of sticky tires you would be surprised well the car stops. That or go all the way and install one of the Wilwood brake kits offered by TTT, ArizonaZcar or Silvermine.
  41. 1 point
    Joe called me yesterday to let me know my stub axles were from an earlier batch so no problem. How many company owners will do that for a customer? Thank you for your follow up Joe.
  42. 1 point
    Yes there was a batch that wasn't annealed properly. Somehow they slipped thru their QC. Common problem is what you see here too hard the end just snaps off. If you have a set you would like to have checked please send them back to me. I will take care of it for you. Sorry for the inconvenience. FYI the manufacture just upped their price on each part by $50.00. So that puts my cost at $750.00 plus shipping almost what they sell them for. Don't forget I need to buy 10 parts at a time. Thanks Joe
  43. 1 point
    Update from me, Joe from Chequered Flag Racing has been in contact with the Manufacturer and they have agreed to replace my stub axles too when they make a new batch. Thanks Joe.
  44. 1 point
    Excellent on getting the turn signals working! Now on to your headlights. Here is a basic troubleshoots guide I put together for someone else, I believe you have done much of this but take a moment to review it to see if anything in it helps. Here’s a sorta step by step process for checking. 1) Start by checking the Engine bay main fusible links connections. The one closest to the fender (outer) and the front (away from the firewall) is the one that provides power to the headlight switch. These often get tarnished or corroded at the Blade connectors. Once these are cleaned and you’ve verified power on each side of the connection then move to the column. 2) Check the large White/red wire at the column; this is power from the main fusible links. This is where power enters your switch. When the switch is turned on, power exits the switch to the fuse box by way of the large Red wire with the bullet connection. At the fuse box the power is split into 2 circuits, one for each headlight. 3) Check for power at the two headlight fuses and ensure the fuses to the fuse-box connections are clean and good. 4) Since both headlights are affected, it’s not likely that these two separate power-circuits to the headlight bulbs are the issue. 5) The headlights share two common ground circuits, one for Low beam & one for High beam. Since both high & low beams are affected it is not likely these individual ground circuits from headlights back to the Turn Signal switch (High/Low selector). 6) There is a wire at the column that connects the Turn signal switch (High/Low selector) to the Headlight combo switch. Check that connection; this is where the ground circuit routes to the Head Light switch, which then continues out the large Black wire with the Blade connector to ground. There is no factory relay in the headlight circuit. There are aftermarket kits or people modify to add a relay. If yours has this mod. then the wiring and relay for this could be a suspect as well.
  45. 1 point
    280zx has a completely different body. Why would it?
  46. 1 point
    No its just a step up for the barb you should be fine.
  47. 1 point
    Oh yeah thanks for the reminder. I do have the original seats, if anyone wanted them. But the new seats are cooler
  48. 1 point
    A little background info: car was stock when I bought it from NC, with 80k on engine frame rails replaced undercoating redone floor pans replaced tub scraped, repainted, dynamat l28e replaced with rb20det rb20det with new intake manifold, exhaust manifold (soon to be replaced turbo, injectors, coils) custom exhaust I'm in the process of putting the engine back together and then it is getting dropped back in. Then will put in some coil overs, even though bags would be INSANE on this car. Then tires, wheels, some small other changes, as well as putting in a nice interior. I'm hoping this car will be up and running for Spring time!! I can't wait to rip my baby around(:
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    RE: "Ramps Safer than Jackstands" As someone who has watched stamped-steel ramps rated at 3X the total weight of the vehicle driven upon them spontaneously collapse... "Not on my life ever again!" I will NEVER use a ramp of stamped-steel ever again, as well as those three-legged jack stands that look like they were made from muffler tubing split a 120 degrees. I have a solid wood set of ramps I use, and an injection moulded plastic set that I use. Once the car is up on the ramps SOMETHING blocks it there, and SOMETHING is under the frame. *** As for pulling the pan...it's all above, nothing insurmountable...usually biggest issue is the Nissan Applied gaskets are like a subatomic bond with the block and pan and splitting them apart can be a chore even with a special Nazi-Era Scraper that you can whang in there with a rawhide mallet to separate the surfaces. I tend to spray up into and onto the inner block surfaces with brake cleaner to prevent oil from rolling down into the gasket area while mounting and sealing. I use the brake cleaner into each of the bolt holes to prevent oil up inside from coming out and making a leak path in the sealant. Finally, I use studs on the reassembly, all sunk in and sealed (to prevent the oil path mentioned above.) The use of studs allows me to make them long enough to accommodate 1/2" 'sandwich plates' similar to that used on later L28's and L28ET's to spread the clamping function of the pan bolts (nuts) without deforming the pan rails. They are made from 1/2"x1/8" or strap steel I get at Home Depot's metal rack. I make the rails straight, put the clamping sandwich strips on there, and use Flanged Nuts to squeeze it all together. There are two studs that are longer than the rest situated diagonally opposite corners...I put the pan with sealant on it up until I can get a flange nut started on one, then the one in the back... This lets the pan sit without touching the flanges for a final inspection and maybe alcohol wipe before pushing it up to sealant contact and finger tightening those two nuts. After that, you can quickly do the rest of the nuts. With a piece of 1/2 square keystock set in your vice you can put your pan over it and beat those concave bolt holes down flat again...and using the above clamping sandwich strips with flanged nuts will keep you from ever having to do it again! I also have a bitchen $300+ breakaway torque screwdriver (that someone else paid for) I can use to tighten the bolts exactly where they need to be... I prefer Loctite 598 as sealant alone, or as gasket dressing. If you have a gasket you really need the sandwich strips and a flat flange. With Loctite 598 you can lay your proper bead for sealing, snug the nuts to get initial compression, let it set up overnight/24 hours to cure and then retorque to proper number the next day to get some compression on the 'gasket' you just made with the 598. Loctite 598 and Permatex Ultra Black are EXACTLY the same substance, BOTH made by Henkel and simply marketed in different markets with different brands. This comes straight from Henkel Technical Support Engineering. We use it on our oil sumps which are immersed in hot oil 24/7/365 and rarely are expected to be opened for inspection before 5 years of continuous running. It is more tolerant of surface debris / contamination than prior RTV's. Our testing indicated between metal blocks, a bead will have at least a 40X espansion rate in close fitting pieces...meaning a 2mm bead will spread to 80mm wide EASILY when compressed. A 2mm bead is ALL you need if you have less than 1mm distortion. By putting a 2mm bead on the pan and then tightening to metal-to-metal, the bead will EASILY compress to cover the entire mounting flange area, even in the warped areas...effectively permanently sealing the gaps. *** Even when I don't replace the bolts with studs... those two diagonal studs and flange nuts are installed it helps hold the pan coming off as well! They're like 1" long....I cap them with a piece of vacuum tubing after install so the exposed threads are not gummed up with road grime. If you get realllllly fancy and have longer studs that stick out at least 1/4" beyond the face of the flange nut...those vinyl vacuum caps that are available in Red, Blue, Yellow, Black make for a bitchen detail all around the pan surface as a nice contrast... You know.... "While you're in there..."
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