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So I have two engines on hand to swap into my '74 260Z. A RB25DET Neo or a 340 4 bbl out of a '71 Cuda. Car is going to be daily driven and occasionally taken the the track/rallycrossed. I see pluses on both side but am slightly leaning towards the RB. Majority decides it, reply with your reasoning

 

http://strawpoll.me/2431054

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RB... because I don't care for V8s...

 

Also Of the RB swaps I've driven, or had a ride in, it seems to have a smooth power band, though I haven't driven an RB25DET NEO, I can imagine it's also pretty smooth in power delivery.

 

The only plus I see of the V8 is that the weight will be farther back. 

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I vote V8.   

I base my reasoning on having owned an RB25DET powered car before.   The problems I had with parts availability both in repair and upgrading, particularly fuel management systems, etc leads me to say that although the RB is an amazing engine and a joy to drive, I would rather have something well documented with parts on the shelf anywhere and everywhere.  

 

The RB is fun until you break down in a parking lot in the middle of nowhere and realize there isn't a parts store in the continental 48 that can help you.   

 

Sure, it's cool to watch people's expressions when you pop the hood and there's that RB block sitting there, but it is much nicer to drive without ever having to worry about parts.   Then again, if you have no problems with waiting for parts or the extra expenses associated with an RB, then I would vote RB all the way, especially if you aren't daily driving it.   

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What are you power goals? I'd sell both and do an L28et.

 

I bought a 260z 4 years ago that had no engine and decided to go RB, but had I known how much of a hassle it was going to be, I would have gone L28et instead. Simple electronics, strong, can reach 300whp without too much trouble, no mounts required. etc.

 

Perhaps I'm jaded because I had to do fuel, intercooler, new rad, electronics on top of all the other troubles of the RB swap (mounts, ECU, new driveshaft, oil pan). But having something that was simpler and still could put out good power would have done me well.

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  • 3 weeks later...

It really depends on what you feel more comfortable with swapping into and your skill level/bank account is. If your more familiar with the v8 then go for it or same with the RB. Although I'm not particularly knowledgeable about that specific cuda engine, both swaps (meaning v8 and rb) have been very well documented.

 

Money aside the RB swap is a stupid simple swap to do, everything has been done already for you in these pages and contrary to popular belief the parts are already here, no need to call Dom up and overnight parts from japan. The beauty of this site is everyone figured out the crossover numbers for USDM equivalents of lots of the rb parts, you have Pat1 making beautiful pans, ebay, nico, zilvia, and if you don't feel like digging in the slightest and don't mind spending a little more hit up rawbrokerage.

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Why does everybody here have so many problems with parts breaking.

 

If this is the case, spend less on swaps, and more on attention to the basic maintenance needs of your vehicle. Breakdowns rarely 'just happen' they are caused by neglect.

 

Either is your choice to make. Whichever you choose, if you maintain it properly breakdowns will never be a real issue in your decision-making process.

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Why does everybody here have so many problems with parts breaking.

 

If this is the case, spend less on swaps, and more on attention to the basic maintenance needs of your vehicle. Breakdowns rarely 'just happen' they are caused by neglect.

 

Either is your choice to make. Whichever you choose, if you maintain it properly breakdowns will never be a real issue in your decision-making process.

You forget he is planning on racing the car as well. While maintenance is important for keeping your car running good you do have the unexpected items that do break. Which is why so many people have chosen to go for engines that are mass produced in America. Don't get me wrong SR and RB engines are vary strong engines that can produced similar power to that of a v8 with better gas mileage. But since they were not produced here in America certain parts do take longer to get a hold of. For example: igniter chip on a sr20det are known to occasionally fail. This is a part that you cannot cross over to an American sr20de. The American SR still uses a distributor while the Japanese SR20det uses coil on plug. So if you don't already have an extra one you will be waiting around to get one second hand or shipped from Japan. In the meantime you are walking. But his American v8 on the other hand if the carburetor goes bad you can just go to AutoZone and get one same day hence car is fixed and you are ready to roll. Edited by Driftinrican
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Please consider the components and MTBF in the real world. Carburettor failure? Really?

 

How many GM HEI modules have I stored in glove boxes because they fail?

 

That's  maintenance preparation. If you prepare properly, you don't get bitten. If you do, it's such a catastrophic failure, nothing you could have forseen would have saved you in ANY eventuality.

 

I understand the theory being put forth, I'm here to say it's faulty as a basis for making the decision. You know what you will need as reasonable spares, and you provision accordingly. Blow a crankshaft or set of pistons, you are walking anyway.

 

Blow a rod and you're back asking this same question again... 

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 For example: igniter chip on a sr20det are known to occasionally fail. This is a part that you cannot cross over to an American sr20de. The American SR still uses a distributor while the Japanese SR20det uses coil on plug. So if you don't already have an extra one you will be waiting around to get one second hand or shipped from Japan. In the meantime you are walking.

 

http://forums.nicoclub.com/addenum-to-rb20-25-26-igniter-swap-to-vg30-z32-j30-igniter-t251366.html

 

or 

 

http://forums.nicoclub.com/another-successful-ls1-coil-swap-t435099.html

 

Quick searches show that most everything has been figured out already one way or another. And as I've said in my previous post, if the person is too lazy to search for what others did in finding USDM replacement parts its only a quick call/email to rawbrokerage to order from their warehouse in Florida.

 

If this was the year 2000 and Stony and others were first considering doing these swaps I'd say I believe you, but this is a well beaten path by now.

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It's a virtual world now... I live in the Philippines, and source parts for my JDM (LHD Conversion) Suzuki Turbo Every from Canada, Australia, USA, UK, Holland, Japan, etc...

 

Saying things are hard to obtain in the USA is laughable. The internet makes this a moot point. When I lived in Japan 20 years ago, guys were worried about living "out in the sticks" and my response was "you got a telephone and UPS Delivers" ... It's an instant virtual world these days. As noted above, try this kind of stuff 30 years ago and even then...parts were available just expensive.

 

Remember the basic tenet of Nissan Corporate Headquarters Parts Department (Global Services):

ANY NISSAN PART MAY BE ORDERED THROUGH ANY NISSAN AGENCY WORLDWIDE -- YOU JUST NEED THE PART NUMBER.

If you don't have it, you can fax Japan, and they will fax you back the pages for the vehicle applicable and assist you in determining the proper part number to order (much like any Domestic Dealership with a NEW vehicle...) Secondarily, there is a large company in Yokohama which will get you ANYTHING for ANYTHING from the JDM. I'm talking Reman ENGINES ($2,200 for my Suzuki...) Shipping is not cheap...but the choices were not based here on Economics, were they? If you have adequate spares, expensive shipping can be avoided. I knew my turbo was going out...I bought a replacement for $249. I packed it in my luggage the last trip to USA and brought it back...only to need it (I think) just this past month. If I order it from Japan, it's $1,000 and takes five days plus customs duty (and the bribes...) 

 

My basic contention is that if you have ever read Smith's "Engineer to Win" you realize that preparation is the key. There are no unsuspected failures if you do it right.

 

If something TRULY is unsuspected, something that could not have been inspected and prevented...it's a statistical outlier, and is likely something that will sideline you no matter WHAT engine you choose.

 

If a Turbo F1 Engine can make 1700 HP for the duration of the race without failiing...I think the failures we will be presented with are easily forecasted.

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