Jump to content
HybridZ

240Z EgoBoost by Boben


Recommended Posts

The Alfa fan geometry looks also suitable for both applications so I think it is going to work. Also, a fan can produce a much bigger volumetric air flow in a push configuration compared to a pull configuration.

Now that I look at the picture of the fan I posted assembled in front of the condenser, I realize that the geometry is definitely meant for a pull application and not optimal for a push aplication. Too bad... I guess I'll just need to wait and see when the day comes when I finally get the car running, weather or not I run into heat issues.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 75
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I have a 1995 Mustang electric fan mounted ahead of my radiator in my front air dam. The fan was originally meant to be mounted behind the radiator as a puller, but I have it mounted as a pusher. The important thing is that I kept the flow direction the same. The inlet side of the fan is facing forward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You lost me here. I don't think this is correct. If I take a fan, and have it blow one direction, then turn it another direction, it's still blowing the same amount.

Depends on the fans initially design orientation. 'push' fans will often be optimized for higher static pressure than a pull setup. That being said, the real world difference isn't probably that big... Adequate shrouds are probably the most important factor.

Edited by tim.d
Link to post
Share on other sites

For mine, I made sure that the air that entered the front of the car had nowhere to go except through the radiator. The fan is only necessary when you are not moving. If you give the air an escape route after it goes through the radiator, then the cooling will be more efficient regardless of the fan.

 

http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/70097-show-your-custom-front/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the fans initially design orientation. 'push' fans will often be optimized for higher static pressure than a pull setup. That being said, the real world difference isn't probably that big... Adequate shrouds are probably the most important factor.

What I've come to understand from work dealing with filtered air cooling systems for electrical cabinets is that a fan has a hard time sucking air through a filter, which is basically the same thing as pulling air through a radiator. Also, while axial fans are capable of producing the same amount of air flow as radial fans without restrictions, the situation changes quite dramatically when a restrictive element such as a filter is introduced in front. In this confuration, the radial fan is the winner in terms of air flow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...

It's been waaay too long. It is over two years since I've worked on the car, but I finally found some time after finishing our new house and garage (to the point that we were able to move in anyway...)

Actually, I needed to make some shelves for my garage and got some rusty old industrial shelves for free. They needed sand blasting and painting so I decided to do the 240Z "on the side".

Of course the work on the 240Z ended up being the more time consuming task, and the Wife also expressed herself on the long hours at the garage.

Anyway, the very tedious process of sand blasting the shell to remove all the surface rust from all the welds, spraying the first layer of epoxy, seam sealing everything and finally spraying the second layer of epoxy (in black) to the bottom, to the interior and to the engine bay is finally done!

May the pictures speak for themselves:

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

It's been over a year since my last update. Here we go!

Once the engine bay and bottom paint job was done I sprayed some rock guard on the bottom and ran the brake lines and fuel lines  in the tunnel.

Then it was time to assemble the GTR rear sub-frame, but only after renewing the bushings and sandblasting and painting the sub-frame.

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

As the GTR rear hubs are 5x114.3, I needed a five lug conversion in the front. The plan is to also move the brake discs on the front side of the hub. As I was not sure about the rim offset measurement I finally want, rather than going all in with some billet aluminum hubs, I decided to make the first version by converting the existing hubs.

I acquired a set of bolt pattern conversion spacers made out of aluminum.

First thing to do was to machine a centered surface to the cast iron hub on a lathe to firmly seat and position the spacer.

Unfortunately I do not have a picture of the machined surface.

Then I sand blasted the hubs from the back side and painted the hubs in black.

Getting everything to work required also machining some custom washers and nuts on the lathe.

While I was at it, I assembled a set of new wheel bearings.

The PO had customized the strut towers to accommodate some Tein adjustable coilovers a few years back along with other custom adjustable front suspension parts. I just sandblasted the parts and applied some paint.

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The BMW V8 with overhead cams and the 180 degree exhaust manifold is so wide that the steering axle rubber joint does not have enough room at the upper end of the axle so I decided to flip the axle the other way around and move the rubber joint to the bottom. This obviously meant disassembling the universal joints. Luckily I was able to source a new set of joints as they did not actually dismantle very easy, required the use of a hydraulic press and got damaged during the process.

I am quite happy with the outcome although I still need to finish the parts off with some fresh paint.

 

The first picture illustrates the situation where the axle has not yet been modified. It is quite evident that the rubber joint would not fit.

 

spacer.png

 

Before dismantling the joints...

 

spacer.png

 

Afterwards - everything back together with all new joints...

 

spacer.png

 

This is how it looks like from the bottom with the engine and exhaust piping. Extension axle from the steering rack relocates the bottom joint to the other side of the motor mount. I also added an extra support with a bearing due to the remote location of the joint.

 

spacer.png

 

 The new configuration can be more easily viewed without the engine.

 

spacer.png

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jboogsthethug said:

Dang this is looking good! Is that an R32 subframe? How hard is it to fit in? Also, you're not doing AWD are you? Just rear?

Yep, it is an R32 subframe. I went about the fitment by gradually cutting off more and more of the original sheet metal from the bottom. The task was quite tedious, due to the fact that I wanted to retain the original GTR32 suspension geometry with the control arm angles so it meant fitting the subframe quite deep into the 240Z body. I've seen others fit the subframe much more to the surface.

The car will be RWD.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Jboogsthethug said:

Very interesting. Does the subframe swap just give your rear suspension better geometry overall? Just curious why people swap it out if they're not doing the AWD or something.

I was mainly looking to get a differential with a lock and capability to take a serious amount of torque.

I was also intrigued by the more modern double wishbone type of suspension setup which offers very good adjustment options. There is also at least a theoretical benefit over macpherson in terms of keeping the camber gain negative throughout the whole suspension travel whereas in the macpherson strut suspension, the camber gain turns positive with larger outwards travel. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...