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Hello! I'm new to the "Z-Community" but what I can say so far is that it's GREAT! The enthusiasm and support so far has been fantastic. I recently purchased 1974 260Z with 56,000 miles on it. The car sat, covered on a car-port for nearly 30 years. I have a four phase plan for the car.

 

Phase 1: brakes and Suspension

Phase 2: drive train

Phase 3: Engine upgrade

phase 4: Body and Paint.

 

I look forward to sharing the build with the community and drawing on the experience that is available. I hope that as my project progresses I can "pay it forward" to those that follow.

Bob_260

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There are no verbs in your plan.  Are you planning to drive the car while working on it or work on these things over a long time frame?  You haven't mentioned what you plan to do with the car when it's done.  An engine "upgrade" for drag-racing would not be the same as one for the street or autocross.

 

Might be fun to just get it back to stock running condition before the final plan is set.  I bought mine thinking I'd do a small-block chevy swap but found that the L6 is plenty of work and fun.

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My plan for the car is mostly street, with a little bit of weekend autocross thrown-in for fun. I will drive it as the projects progress. But to be honest I enjoy planning the projects and working on my cars as much as the driving (maybe more!). My first priorty is making sure the car goes where I point it and stopping! That's why I've started with brakes and suspension.

 

I'll be glad to share some photos as the project progresses.....if someone can give me a tip on how to upload them to the site.

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Click More Reply Options.  Then Choose File, then Attach This File.

 

If it has sat for 30 years, the brake fluid has probably absorbed enough moisture to corrode both wheel cylinders, both calipers, and the master cylinder.  If you're lucky the brake drums will come off so that you can work on the shoes and get to the wheel cylinder bolts.  Should be fun.

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As I said in my original posts, I hope that by sharing my experiences with my 260z build (that's a nice way of saying mistakes) I can help some future Newbie avoid some of the same mistakes. (Why make the same mistakes over and over when there are SOOOO many new ones you can make!)

 

So here is my first "experience". My car was built in 10/73 so it should have the earlier 240Z suspension, but when I checked what was supposed to be the best indicators, the front hubs, I found that the car has the round hubs of the 280z and a factory rear swaybar . So I ordered parts for a 280z. WRONG!

 

So for the next Newbie here is what else would have been helpful for me. The swaybar for the 280z that I recieved is straight across the width of the car, while the swaybar that was on the car has a 50mm bend in the middle of the bar (see attached photos). The other issue is the strut assembly. I ordered Coilovers for a 280Z. But they diameter is too big. The outside daimeter of my strut tubes are 51mm. Measuring the Coilovers that I recieved it appears that the 280Z has a 56mm outside diameter. (See photos)

 

I hope this helps someone avoid the same mistake on their build.

 

If anyone out there knows of other 260 specific suspension differences, I would welcome you input!

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Early 260Z front struts have slightly lower spring perches than 240Z struts, making them early 260Z-specific. The rears are identical to the 240Z from what I've measured. Most everything else is similar to 240Z. If you ever do bushings, you need 280Z bushings for all 260Z steering racks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Everything is apart. I had to take the assembly to a local machine shop to have the spindle pins removed. (They don't just slide out like it shows in the factory Manuel! Hahahah). I have the original spring perches cut off and will have the new spring perches for the Coilovers welded on tomorrow. Then everything is going to be powder coated.

 

Question for the community: While I have the suspension out and there is lots of room to work, I plan to replace my defective fuel tank level sending unit. Other than making sure that I have enough gas out of the tank to avoid having it run all over the place. Are there any "tricks" that make this easier or does anyone have a "mistake to avoid" that they can share? I have a new gauge and "o"-ring.post-47923-0-32232700-1426113231_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 weeks later...

With the rear suspension out of the car replacing the Fuel tank level sending unit was very simple. The whole process took 30 minutes or less! Now that I did it I almost embarassed that I asked for advice. The biggest concern was "have I siphoned enough gas out of the tank?" I basically siphoned everything I could out of the tank, and that happened to be about 9 gallons. So I was sure I was below the half full level even if I hadn't been able to get everything out of the tank.post-47923-0-02176700-1428097097_thumb.jpgpost-47923-0-42750400-1428097175_thumb.jpg

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All the rear suspension parts are back from the powder coater and they look great! The new spring perches are welded on strut towers for the Ground Control Coilovers and the adapters are installed for the Silver Mine Stage IV big brake kit. I will also be installing the 7/8" rear swaybar as part of the suspension upgrade.

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Given all the trouble removing the old spindle pins, I went to Harbor Freight and bought a long round wire brush and mounted it in my drill to clean out any rust. It seemed to work well, the new spindle pin fit snuggly but,slide in and out without any problems. I plan to apply Never-Sieze to them when I do final install. I don't if it will,make any difference, but at least I tried!post-47923-0-96923600-1428713257_thumb.jpg

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Antiseize definitely helps and that was great to brush them out. Unfortunately, most of the antiseize scrapes off going into the bore. Also, hopefully you won't have to remove it for 20 years and it WILL rust again in that interval. Lube up the locator pin well too. The hot ticket is to get rid of the Nissan part and replace it with a 5/8" bolt. The bolt has just enough extra clearance to make getting it out easier even if a little rusty.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Things are starting to go back together. I have installed 22mm rear swaybars (the car came with 20mm's on the rear). I had to enlarge the swaybar bushing to accept the larger bar. The kit came with a 20mm bushing. I used a 25mm grinding wheel on my drill and just keep working the hole until the split line just closed.

 

The lower control arms are also installed. Everything seems to be going back together smoothly so far! The strut towers are at the local machine shop having the bearings pressed in and the end-play set. I hope to get them back this week and to continue to reassemble the rear suspension

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