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Home Built by Jeff

Home Built Z 'Full video build'

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4 hours ago, winstonusmc said:

You have the mustache bar backwards. Check out this thread:

https://www.zdriver.com/forums/240z-260z-280z-s30-forums-9/240-suspension-swap-40952/

You might have the R200 bar, the bolt spacing is a little wider then the R180. The R180 bar is also supposed to be in front of the vehicle suspension mounts. 

 

Also, do you have the alignment dowels from the engine to transmission? I cant remember if the L24 has them, but on the RB there are two dowels the align the trans to the engine. This also aligns the plate, which will allow the bolts and starter to align as well. There is a hollow dowel, similar to the head dowels, on the left bolt opposite of the starter and a solid dowel on the top of the engine in between the top bolts. If these are not there, the engine could be off enough to destroy a clutch like this:

From a buddy's GTR with a missing dowel pin.

20170913_215054.thumb.jpg.5adbd8b31b9d3cca6b94bf67af76a827.jpg

I have the top dowel, not the bottom one. I am happy enough with the gearbox alignment now, it is just that cover plate was a pain. We will see I suppose if I have stuffed up.

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Jeff, hate to keep harping on the transmission slave cylinder, clutch fork, collar, and throw-out bearing... BUT...

 

I strongly recommend that you get the correct length collar and use the stock throw-out bearing.  When all that is correct inside the bell housing, the fork should be pushed forward far enough that there is virtually no play between the fork and the stock slave push rod. 

 

In it's current configuration I believe you may well have trouble with the collar moving too far forward and slipping off the tube that it should glide back and forth on.  If it does that while driving you'll be in trouble... The collar length needs to match the pressure plate thickness (not necessarily the type transmission you have but the clutch package).  I have 3 different length collars in my collection.

 

I also have fear and trepidation about that mustache bar.  You definitely have an R180 diff and you need an R180 mustache bar that's mounted properly.  The Z differential has a tendency to move - a  lot - in it's factory fresh condition and I always want those bolt holes to fit nice and tight because the nuts will NOT hold the differential to the bar (without moving) by themselves.

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8 minutes ago, cgsheen said:

Jeff, hate to keep harping on the transmission slave cylinder, clutch fork, collar, and throw-out bearing... BUT...

 

I strongly recommend that you get the correct length collar and use the stock throw-out bearing.  When all that is correct inside the bell housing, the fork should be pushed forward far enough that there is virtually no play between the fork and the stock slave push rod. 

 

In it's current configuration I believe you may well have trouble with the collar moving too far forward and slipping off the tube that it should glide back and forth on.  If it does that while driving you'll be in trouble... The collar length needs to match the pressure plate thickness (not necessarily the type transmission you have but the clutch package).  I have 3 different length collars in my collection.

 

I also have fear and trepidation about that mustache bar.  You definitely have an R180 diff and you need an R180 mustache bar that's mounted properly.  The Z differential has a tendency to move - a  lot - in it's factory fresh condition and I always want those bolt holes to fit nice and tight because the nuts will NOT hold the differential to the bar (without moving) by themselves.

I did switch back to the correct throw out bearing, and after my playing around, if I went to the longer collar (how I simulated going back to the large on that it came with) the fork is wedged hard against the front of the opening. Now the fork is sitting exactly where it should, but I just have the incorrect slave cylinder. I think the fix I have done with the pin will work perfectly.

 

The moustache bar is something I will look further into, as there appears to be several different ones, but I should be able to grab one.

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Re Manifold Studs:

 

It's not a requirement to run studs, though they DO make it easier to mount the manifolds. That said, a far more useful case is to prevent seizing from ruining your day. No mater what, steel in touch with an exhaust manifold threaded into aluminum WILL corrode and want to become a permanent fixture in the aluminum. Studs allow you to pull manifolds off with just removing a steel on steel bond, which is far less likely to snap on you. As someone who's had to deal with snapped studs, if I could rewind the clock I'd just leave studs be unless the threads were trashed.

 

As far as source, there's a lot of combinations that would work, and several suppliers depending on how long you're willing to wait for shipping. I'm sure there's a fasterner option in your region that could get you sorted though. Especially as I'd imagine there's a lot more metric fasteners than we get from our local shops here in the USA.

 

https://www.thezstore.com/page/TZS/PROD/15-8080

(useful info in the application notes in the above link)

 

There's lots of ebay options too, though I haven't taken the time to see if any are based in Australia or how long it would take to ship to you.

 

That said, I'd check the threads for yourself, measure depth, and then find genuine "exhaust studs" from super cheap  or similar, in that thread pitch. I only suggest this because of my concerns about seizing. Having the right material can make a huge difference versus just grabbing generic bolts from the drawers.

 

Re Thermostat Lines:

 

That line coming out would have gone to the OEM throttle body. No need to retain.

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Americans dont know about boxing day they have Black Friday though. I think its a British, Australian and Canadian thing :P

 

edit thats your crank case breather, on fuel injected cars it goes to the intake manifold with PCV valve.

Edited by softopz

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Jeff, the torque procedure for the front axle nut is very specific.  You'll find it in the Factory Service Manual.  You'll lose your wheel bearings if you don't follow it.

 

Also, there's supposed to be a "cage" that goes over the nut.  After you properly torque the nut, you fit the cage (which is like a castle nut - a "castle cage" I guess...) such that you can get the clevis pin in place.  The clevis pin through the castle and the cage over the nut keeps the nut in it's proper place post-torque.  (A picture would be worth more than a thousand words in this case - but I don't have one...)  An actual castle nut would work as well.

Edited by cgsheen

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1 hour ago, cgsheen said:

Jeff, the torque procedure for the front axle nut is very specific.  You'll find it in the Factory Service Manual.  You'll lose your wheel bearings if you don't follow it.

 

Also, there's supposed to be a "cage" that goes over the nut.  After you properly torque the nut, you fit the cage (which is like a castle nut - a "castle cage" I guess...) such that you can get the clevis pin in place.  The clevis pin through the castle and the cage over the nut keeps the nut in it's proper place post-torque.  (A picture would be worth more than a thousand words in this case - but I don't have one...)  An actual castle nut would work as well.

I did it the same way I have been taught with all wheel bearings. Basically you tighten it up until it it hard to turn and then back it off just enough to get it to spin freely, and you are good.

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