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Broken Fuel Pump Bolt

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I'm trying to get my new Series 1 240Z project car started, and it looks like the original fuel pump isn't working. I bought a replacement, but the bottom bolt snapped in half while I was removing the original.  Now I have half of that bolt stuck in my block with no good way to pull it out.  Does anyone out there have any good ideas?  I've heard of people welding on nuts, but I've never welded in my life so I'm a little worried about trying it.  Also, I'd like to get a replacement bolt for when I eventually pull that sucker out. Does anyone know what size bolt this is?

broken_fuel_pump_bolt.jpeg

Edited by rand

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A pair of vise grips might do it.  File some flats on to the stub so that you can get a good grip.  Position the vise grips in a good spot for grip and leverage and get them as tight as you can.  If they start to slip at all when trying to turn the stub, stop.  Don't destroy the stub.

 

If you don't have the right type of vise grip take the time to go to the store and buy them.  Some time and money now will save you a lot of aggravation.  Preparing everything for the twist is key.

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Welding a nut on is the best solution, it's a M8x1.25 bolt. Use a M10 nut so you get better penetration and leave the nut partially off the stud so there is a bit of a pocket you can fill with weld. Before welding the nut on, fill the oil pump hole with one of those blue "shop towel" paper towels and tape over it so you can't get anything inside the engine. 

Another idea I just thought of for those with out a welder. You may be able to get the stud out by continually soaking it in PB blaster over a day. Then clean the stud really well with acetone and a small wire brush. Cover it with red loctite 271, thread a nut on, and let it cure over night. I would try that before filing flats into it, because you can do one before the other, but not vise versa. I've also found channellock GL-6 pliers to work better than vise grips(though I haven't used the V-jaw vise grips yet) and they would work better with out filing flats on the stud.

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40 minutes ago, manimal said:

Cover it with red loctite 271, thread a nut on, and let it cure over night.

 

I like the red loctite idea.  Another option is JB Weld Steel-Stick.  If you use either, stick a piece of plastic wrap over the nub, leaving the threads uncovered, so that you don't glue the nut to the head.  And clean the threads of any lubricants.  MEK or acetone preferred for cleaning.

 

Filing flat is apparently personal preference, along with channel-locks vs vise-grips.  Maybe based on hand strength, who knows.  But if you squeeze on the threads they will deform and you'll get limited contact area.  Then the pliers will probably slip.  Clamp on solid steel flats and you'll get less slippage.  In the end though, if you do strip threads off you'll end up filing flats.  I just jumped ahead to where the neophyte will probably end up.  You'll probably crush the threads, round off the end of the stub in to a cone shape, then wear it down in to a tiny useless mound.  Unless you plan ahead and are very careful.  Good luck.

Edited by NewZed

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 I'm glad to see there's enough bolt left to grab or weld onto. That simplifies things. I've found that alternating heat and cold along with any of the methods suggested above will usually free them up. I use a propane torch to heat the bolt and surrounding area. Then apply cold to the bolt only, as much as possible. CRC Freeze-Off works well but I've also used dry ice and plain ice. I have better luck using good Channel-Locks than Vise-Grips. If it won't crack loose on the first attempt, try turning it in(clockwise) then reverse direction. Keep turning it both ways while spraying penetrant onto it. The theory is the cold will shrink the bolt allowing penetrating fluid to seep into the threads.

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If there's enough thread to thread on two nuts, you tighten them together, then wrench on the inner nut to remove the stud.  Otherwise, vise grips is probably the best non-welding solution, as suggested by the others. The 

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That red loctite idea is good for a first try.  High strength thread locker.  Worst case the nut just comes off and you're left with more grippy threads.  Probably pay about $8 for a tube of Loctite.

 

Most of us try to go cheap with the tools at hand.  And regret it.

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1 hour ago, NewZed said:

Most of us try to go cheap with the tools at hand.  And regret it.

Quote

You'll probably crush the threads, round off the end of the stub in to a cone shape, then wear it down in to a tiny useless mound.

 

So... A friend of mine loaned me one of these gadgets claiming he had gotten out plenty of stuck bolts with it.  Well, all it managed to do was turn my bolt into a peg (see attached depressing photo).  The nut still kind of threads onto it so I applied some J-B Weld 2-part KwikWeld to the inside of a nut and it's curing onto the peg now (with plenty of Saran Wrap between it and the block).  I'm going to let it set overnight and see if I can get it out tomorrow.  Thanks for all of the help everyone, I'll let you all know how it goes.

 

@manimal : How did you know what size bolt it is? I checked the FSM as well as my Haynes manual, and none of them specify any of the bolt sizes. Do you have another book you pulled the info from, or did you just know it off-hand? I'd love to be able to look this kind of stuff up in the future.

 

broken_fuel_pump_peg.jpeg

Edited by rand

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Since the bolt is iron in aluminum, it's possible to dissolve the bolt straight out of the hole using an alum and water solution. There was a great video on this by AvE that I've previously linked to, but it appears to have been removed from youtube. Here's another version of the same thing (by the same guy) that covers the "science" of it.

 

 

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If you haven't been soaking it in penetrating oil, you need to.  Welding on another bolt/nut is your best option.  You're going to need one anyway if you're going to be modifying cars.  Even a cheap Harbor Freight will work for this.  I've read that they are pretty decent for the money.  There are a few welder recommendation threads on HZ.  Good luck!

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Ok, so just a quick update - so far nothing I've tried has had any success.  Last weekend I tried JB-Welding a nut onto the stub after roughing it up a little with a file and cleaning it off with acetone.  I used the two-part stuff instead of the SteelStick because it claims a higher strength.  After letting that cure for two days I put a wrench to it, and it just broke off immediately.  I then tried filing some flats onto the stub and turning it with an adjustable crescent wrench, but it just rounded off my flats.  I also tried vise-grips and channel locks (even squeezing the hell out of my channel locks with another pair of channel locks) with no luck.  That bolt is seriously stuck in there.  I've been hosing it down with PB Blaster every morning before I head out to work, but I don't think it's making a difference.  Finally, on the advice of a friend I bought a left-handed die and managed to get a few threads onto the stub last night.  It's in pretty bad shape now after all of the abuse and I didn't want to take too much more material off, so I just did what I could and applied some red Loctite to a left-handed nut which is curing on there now.  I'll try turning it tonight and see what happens, but given how stubborn it's been so far I have low expectations.

 

At this point, I'm fine with just bringing in a professional to help me out. I did some searching online and came across this guy who does house calls, so I'll give him a call and see what he charges.  I'm also fine just removing the whole head and bringing it out to a machine shop. Does anyone have a shop they recommend in the LA / Sherman Oaks / Van Nuys area?

Edited by rand

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People say that the welding process itself will often help break a bolt loose.  The heat and the current.

 

You can spend a lot of money at a machine shop.  Make sure you agree on a maximum price.  Sometimes they get obsessed and will take a lot of time to get it out, all at their hourly rate.

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1 hour ago, NewZed said:

People say that the welding process itself will often help break a bolt loose.  The heat and the current.

 

Yeah, I believe it. I'm a little scared to try welding for the first time a few mm from that machined surface though. Maybe I'm being too timid and should just give it a try, but I'm worried about splattering metal and having to pay to get the pump mount resurfaced. 

 

Great tip about agreeing on a price with a machine shop beforehand, any idea what a decent rate for something like this would be?

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