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datsun_dom

Welded R180 hp limit

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Hey all. So I'm planning on turning my car into a drift car over the next few seasons. I am planning on doing a r200 swap down the road but I just plan on welding the r180 for now. My question is what is the torque limit of a welded diff. I know the first thing to go in the r180 is the spider gears so welding them should take care of them. Now what would be the next thing to go in the diff. And roughly at what point. I know this is all hypothetical but any help is appreciated

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Actually, the stub axles are often the weak link in the drive train vs the diff and half-shafts.  I'd hesitate to give an actual number limit, because it depends on so many variables.  If you can provide some specifics on your build and setup, might be able to better answer your question.

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It's a l26 bored out 10 over with a comp stage 1 cam intake and exhaust ports matched to manifold MSD 6al Msa 6-2 headers stock 4 speed transmission rebuilt. I have a stock replacement exedy clutch but may upgrade to a different clutch for the drift setup. It's on CX racing weld on coilover  and polyurethane bushing throughout My main concern is all the clutch kicking and load I will be spurring onto the drivetrain.

Edited by datsun_dom

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Jhm is right. The stub axles can go long before the diff. I'd also point out that driveline angle kills the stub axles in short order. The famous pic of jnjdragracing doing a wheel stand on a R200 is a bit misleading. If you dig through those posts you'll see that he was really peticular about making sure ride height was set properly so the car would squat to level axles under launch, and did a great job setting the car up.

 

If you can minimize transient squat and lift by running stiff springs and don't lower the car much at all, you'll likely be okay for a long time. Otherwise you're better off finding a shop that can make you custom one piece CV shafts end to end to minimize chance of breakage, but that's certainly not a minimal cost.

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12 hours ago, Gollum said:

If you can minimize transient squat and lift by running stiff springs and don't lower the car much at all, you'll likely be okay for a long time. Otherwise you're better off finding a shop that can make you custom one piece CV shafts end to end to minimize chance of breakage, but that's certainly not a minimal cost.

Zcar Garage is now offering that at around $1600

 

http://www.zcarblog.com/2018/06/08/performance/parts-z-car-garage-cv-axles.html

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If it's an early 260Z or a 240Z then the stub axles in the rear hubs might be the weak link.  Theu-joint half shafts seem pretty tough, many guys keep them on their V8 swaps.  But the side loads you'll put on the hub axles will be high.

 

Don't the drifter guys run high air pressure on hard compound tires?  It's not like you're maximizing traction for drag racing.

 

When you weld the spider gears to the carrier you essentially make a solid axle.  The things that used to spin and break don't spin any more.

 

There are old threads about guys needing to modify the steering to drift.  The Z's don't have much range lock-to-lock.  They don't drift well.  The diff is probably the least of your issues.

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1 hour ago, Nelsonian said:

Zcar Garage is now offering that at around $1600

 

http://www.zcarblog.com/2018/06/08/performance/parts-z-car-garage-cv-axles.html

 

 

Yeah... that hilariously doesn't solve the main problem, which is the sub on the hub side. That's what people break. I actually don't know that I've ever see an axle that replaces break, though I don't pretend to be any authority on that.

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Welding the diff puts more stress on the rest of the drivetrain of course, I thought that drifters used a specific clutch type limited slip diff. Going cheap usually does not work the best. 

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Drifters (who can afford it) use a 2 way lsd but I'm a drifter on a budget plus I'm a LEARNING drifter so I will save the pricey stuff for when I can use it to it's full potential. If I really wanted I could get a r200 spool which would be best scenario in my opinion. 

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