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Joe's 1972 240Z adventure


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I just came across something that may be of interest when redoing all that wiring.  You may already know this.  I was on Wikipedia looking at something and this little paragraph...

 

Non-dyed silicone rubber tape with an iron(III) oxide additive (making the tape a red-orange colour) is used extensively in aviation and aerospace wiring applications as a splice or wrapping tape due to its non-flammable nature. The iron oxide additive adds high thermal conductivity but does not change the high electrical insulation property of the silicone rubber. This type of self-amalgamating tape amalgamates or fuses to itself, so that when stretched and wrapped around cables, electrical joints, hoses and pipes it bonds into a strong seamless rubbery electrically insulating and waterproof layer, although not adhesive. As an electrical insulator, silicone rubber has the added virtue of remaining non-conductive when damaged by heat, reducing the likelihood of runaway arcing.

 

So looked on Amazon, its right there.  I myself may never use crummy old electrical tape again!  Or that melt on insulation tubing.  

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20 hours ago, YoBrother said:

I just came across something that may be of interest when redoing all that wiring.  You may already know this.  I was on Wikipedia looking at something and this little paragraph...

 

Non-dyed silicone rubber tape with an iron(III) oxide additive (making the tape a red-orange colour) is used extensively in aviation and aerospace wiring applications as a splice or wrapping tape due to its non-flammable nature. The iron oxide additive adds high thermal conductivity but does not change the high electrical insulation property of the silicone rubber. This type of self-amalgamating tape amalgamates or fuses to itself, so that when stretched and wrapped around cables, electrical joints, hoses and pipes it bonds into a strong seamless rubbery electrically insulating and waterproof layer, although not adhesive. As an electrical insulator, silicone rubber has the added virtue of remaining non-conductive when damaged by heat, reducing the likelihood of runaway arcing.

 

So looked on Amazon, its right there.  I myself may never use crummy old electrical tape again!  Or that melt on insulation tubing.  

Nice find....

 

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Some more progress. Pulled the passenger fender off, fixed the rust, painted it up inside, painted the area around the strut....took the drivers fender back off, and finished painting for final assembly. I also got the door hinges all painted up prior to install. New fender bolts in. A lot more work than it looks like.

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I hope so.  Every seam has surface rust.....typical for Datsun's at this age.  When all is said and done, you have to spray some WD-40 in those cracks I guess to keep the car "alive".  The boys in Yokohama had no idea the weather conditions in the USA I think.....I read that the first ones that came over started rusting on he way, and arrived with rust already!  Salt air!  So, they had to eat crow and spray a bit of undercoating under them....but it wasn't much!  By the time the 280Z came about, it was much better, but in 1970-1973 it was a novelty!

 

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August 5th....time to paint the under hood and lower valence. Went ahead and sanded underneath with my orbital sander with 1000 grit. The edges and everything I did by hand. Found some bondo in the tip I didn't know about. Remember the slide hammers you screw in to a hole? Yeah that. As for the lower valence, the ends are repos I got off of eBay, the factory ends weren't in good shape....the repos fit perfect! I painted under the valence in gloss black and then did the top in the factory 904 Kilimanjaro White. Here are some pics of the days work. 🙂

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All Metal filler is a God-send.  I have had to use it quite a bit.  being 80% metal and 20% resin, it doesn't shrink, and has the effect that Lead did in the old days for filing in "issues".  My hood tip was filled with it for example.  After it was sanded smooth, a bit of Bondo and all is well!  

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the pics make it look glossy, but under the hood, the clear came out very rough and dull. Maybe it was too hot? I used the same clear on my lower valence and it came out great! Looks like I will have to sand the under hood paint with 2000 grit and get a polishing pad for my orbital sander! The paint looked like it was drying the instant it hit the surface! Well, there's 2-3 good coats of it, so it SHOULD buff out I hope. I hate painting.
 
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