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Lower front of 240Z by removing rubber from strut isolators?


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Ditto what @calZ said.  And depending on which camber plates you select, you will likely have to fabricate some small piece-parts (bushings, spacers, bearings, etc) to make it work with the stock top spring hats (assuming that you're retaining the stock springs or lowering springs of the same OD as stock, like Tokico, Vogtland, or Eibach).  It's essential to retain some sort of bearing in the system because of the fact that the front suspension is constantly rotating, via steering action....the OEM thrust bearing provides this function in the stock setup.

 

You may have heard that you can replace the taller 280-style REAR isolators with the shorter strut isolators to lower the rear by 1-1.5"...this is a common swap for anyone looking to lower the rear of the car.  The "shorter" isolators are used on the front of all years, and the rear of the early years (up to '73, IINM).

 

Hope this helps.

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9 hours ago, calZ said:

You can replace the stock isolators with camber plates and it will lower your car. I don't know of any way you could modify the stock isolators, though. 

 

You can heat them with a torch until they fall apart and remove some of the top ring.  You can get about an inch doing this.  Then you have to modify the metal body of the isolator but cutting the cup in various sections so you can fold it back over the shortened rubber isolator and then tack weld the folds.  This was very common before the widespread adoption of camber plates.  For a street car it's nice as you get some lowering but also it tightens the strut top so in cornering you don't lose as much camber.  Think of it as halfway between stock and camber plates.

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On 7/29/2021 at 1:21 PM, tube80z said:

 

You can heat them with a torch until they fall apart and remove some of the top ring.  You can get about an inch doing this.  Then you have to modify the metal body of the isolator but cutting the cup in various sections so you can fold it back over the shortened rubber isolator and then tack weld the folds.  This was very common before the widespread adoption of camber plates.  For a street car it's nice as you get some lowering but also it tightens the strut top so in cornering you don't lose as much camber.  Think of it as halfway between stock and camber plates.

It works very well.

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