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Jesse OBrien

Who else runs a YouTube channel?

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I suppose I hadn't really considered it before today, but Mighty Car Mods' recent article got me wondering who else is creating video content on YouTube.

Most of our build content on Driven Daily has been going to our YouTube channel and I've been thinking about where we go from here. The hard part is establishing a consistent schedule with decent production quality, and I think we've finally nailed that down. What happens after that, though? There are collaboration opportunities with other channels, potential for sponsorship, paywalls, funding more interesting episodes, etc. I'm very interested to see how more developed channels have solved these kinds of problems and complications.

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That's an interesting question. My hope is that by the time we reach that point, we'll be in a true post-scarcity society and nobody would need to make money creating entertainment. There are plenty of Countries that simply support creators to make good content. It doesn't seem so far-fetched to have something similar to that, where we wouldn't need a paywall or complex digital rights management (which nobody has effectively solved yet).

At least, that's my hope.

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On 3/23/2018 at 6:49 AM, socorob said:

Do you think people will eventually switch to LBRY or some other block chain type content provider?

 

I think the most immediate challenge we're facing is the cost of the underlying infrastructure. This lead to the rise of asymmetrical broadband speeds and has now given rise to monthly volume caps. I'm in the minority that thinks the largest rout of the problem goes all they back to the initial design of TCP/IP which broke the OSI model and split the protocols the wrong direction. If multipathing and multihoming worked natively at the network layer (or specifically if network traffic worked like interprocess traffic on your OS) then we would never have seen the need for massive companies to invest in essentially owning all the backbone in order to turn a profit. The stories of early fiber failures are a comedy of horrors that show just how broken this has always been.

 

I think blockchain is solving a wholly different issue, and that's okay (and I'm glad for it). But it's still needing to run on existing infrastructure. Any way you slice it, sending video content from a single source to even just dozens is impossible on current asymmetrical links, and theory of scale doesn't solve anything because of how large the entire block is to replace something like youtube. Study Netflix global bandwidth consumption and usage patterns. We'll never replace that with current home ISP offerings, current routers, and current consumer-based storage systems.

 

Eventually, the TCP/IP model will die. It might be 10 years, or it might be 50. But it will...

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