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327 chevy crank


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#1 rdv88

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 08:24 PM

I was just wondering if i could take my 350 sbc block and put in a 327 sbc crank with 6 inch rods. Just curious because my crank has already been turned .30 over.

#2 jt1

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 01:57 AM

If the 327 is a large journal, yes. If it's a small journal, no. All 350's are large journal.

You can use 6" rods, but need pistons to match.

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#3 Pyro

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 02:55 PM

It has been turned 0.030 under (not over). Blocks get bored over because the holes get bigger. Cranks get smaller (under).

why make a smaller engine? Get a 350 crank. A 350 will make more power than a 327. People spend a lot of money to make bigger engines like 383's, don't spend money to make a 350 smaller.

6 inch or 5.7 rod. No real difference in power, just cost more.

#4 SilentNight1647

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 04:14 PM

IIRC the 327 only came with a 2.3" main for one year all the rest are 2.45" I wouldn't waste the time with the 327 crank though, if your after the rev get a 350 crank and grind the rods .100" and run small journal rods, or if your really exotic get on of the Eagle rotating assemblies that use a 1.89" Honda rod journal, I wanted to build one but opted for the large journal 383 instead

#5 jt1

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 03:21 AM

posted by silentnight1647

IIRC the 327 only came with a 2.3" main for one year all the rest are 2.45"


The 327 was a small journal engine, like the 283, from when it was first built, 60 or 61, up thru 67. In 68 only, 327's were large journal, like the 350, which came out in 69. 68 was the last year of the 327.

If you have a small journal block, you use a small journal crank, and vice-versa with large journals. It is possible to put a small journal crank into a large journal block using spacers, but some folks have mixed results.

A large journal 327 crank is a pretty unusual item, being a one year only production. They will drop right in a 350 block, and can make a fine motor.

jt
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#6 Pyro

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 07:21 AM

If you what to build something unique then get a set of small journal 5.7 inch rods and off-set grind a 350 crank to fit the smaller rods.

This makes an extra 0.070" stroke, which makes a 362 instead of a 355 with a +0.030" 350. Not much difference, but it does allow to make a Zero-deck setup without machining the block. However, the tops of the pistons will need to be machined off around 0.050".

I use a engine like this just because it was already assembled and sitting on the floor on my local speed machine shop. I put on some 200cc dart iron eagle heads (64cc chambers) and a compcam 292H. I shift at 7000 rpm and it runs mid 11's at 120mph. Not too bad.

#7 SilentNight1647

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 12:45 AM

Whoops look like I had it backwards, large journal for one year small for all the rest. And trust me a small journal 350 runs like a scalded dog we used them in my hobbystock and the extra quick rev made all the difference in the world coming out of the corner.

#8 pparaska

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 09:21 AM

If you build it with a 3.25" crank (327), it's probably small journal and you can use bearing spacers to put it in the 350 block.

If you do that, I'd suggest getting some longer rods and using a shorter piston than a standard 5.7" rodded 327 uses. The standard 327 piston has a lot of extra pin-to-top height and makes for a very heavy piston.

Personally, with the cheap cost of a 383 cast 9000 scat crank, I'd sell the 327 crank and get a new 383 crank and go from there. JMO.

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#9 Mike C

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Posted 01 January 2008 - 06:31 PM

69 was last year of 327 in passenger cars. Lots of times they soldiered on for several years in industrial applications such as combine harversters, boats, etc. The base V8 in a 69 Camaro was 327 through February or so of 69 when it was replaced with 307. 307 is large journal 3.25 stroke, but counterweights are a little different. My buddy found a 307 boat motor in the JY that had a steel crank (307 with a steel crank?!) and built a 4 bolt main 327 for his 70 Z/28.

I have a 331 (.030) in my Jimmy. It's a large journal 327 crank in a 72 high nickel 4 bolt main 350 block. This is a great combo, but if you have to get a crank seems buying a cast steel 350 would be the way to go to use your existing pistons. If you are going to buy the pistons, rods, and a crank. Build a 383 IMO.
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