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toolman

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toolman last won the day on May 8 2017

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  1. Thanks for the kind words. I found that an old hacksaw blade with fine teeth worked well at cutting the excess foam away. Note-The smooth cut of the foam. This is my Rubbish Box for just this dash board project, After trimming the excess foam from the front edge of the dash, the molding is installed to check the alignment. The bottom mold on the glove box was not strong enough to hold the foam so I made a stronger design. The wooden block added the extra support to the mold, Vise grips were used to hold the mold to the dash while welding. The Center dash panel was test fitted into the dash, Mold #5 was created to replace the foam section below the glove compartment. After removal from mold and trimmed. Note-Its thinness and dfferent thickness of both longsides. Bottom view of the glove compartment side of dash. Center bottom view of the dash. Bottom view of the Speedometer side of the dash. Front view of Speedometer side of dash While waiting for the form to cure, I constructed a replacement glove compartment box out .060 aluminum sheet; side view front view The replacement Glove Box was not replicated as I felt aluminum would better suited than a cardboard one. The sides of the box have not been installed as I am planning to line a gray Velour material on the inside of the box. Putting the fabric first without the sides on will make the job easier. All of the exterior foam sections will probably be coated with Fiberglass Finishing Resin to give them more strength. Then, the dash will painted with a textured Dash Black paint so the glove compartment door will match the rest of the dash board.
  2. Four 1/4" holes were drilled in the dash to provide inspection ports in areas to check on foam movement. The lower hole shows the foam coming through the dash. The foam temperature was also monitored with a Infrared thermometer. Inside section being epoxied together using vise grips. Locktite Tite Foam is a foam which expands a lot and should work perfectly for this project. Make sure to wear gloves and safety googles. This stuff is really sticky!! So keep lacquer thinner or acetone nearby to clean up with. The flexible nozzle helps to get into confined areas. Purchased from Home Depot for about $5 a can. There are several places to check dash cap alignment before foaming. Check gap and height alignment here. Another point of alignment is the glove compartment lock hole. Crumbled paper wrapped with black plastic sheeting was used to plugged gauges, speedometer and tach openings. Now the foaming can begin. I started with the top area of the dash as it is the most visible and the most likely to deform. Note-Allow time for foam to expand before spraying more. It will expand more than you expect especially this Locktite Tite Foam. Looks like a snow blizzard. Top view of dash Have to wait 24 hours for the foam to fully cure before cutting away. Probably be using a Dremel, utility knife and razor blades to cut excess foam all. .
  3. My dashboard was in bad shape as most of its early life( 71 to 83) it was parked outside all the time. This picture shows the dashboard broke into eight pieces when it fell off the work bench. Note-Huge cracks through out the dash board So first thing to do was to sandblast the small amount of corrosion of the frame of the dash. My Speed Blaster does a good blasting job on objects to bigger to fit in my sandblasting cabinet. Motorsport supplied the replacement dash cap for $120 as the old dash foam was so bad it would just crumble in your hands. So I decide to replace the dash foam with new stuff. So I decide to use the Motorsport dash cap and the existing dash frame as a mold. Then new foam would poured or injected into this mold. So now I had to seal off the metal part of the dash to be a part of the mold. Black shipping sheeting was utilized to wrap the dash. 3M General Spray Adhesive would sprayed on the hold the sheeting in place. The biggest problems was the Motorsport replacement dash cap did not cover the lower section of the dash board. Four major molds would have to be created to fill in these areas. Using card board and duct tape were used in this process. The inside of the card board would be covered with the black sheeting to provide easy removal from the mold. There were some of the original dash sections that could be reused. View of the Right lower section of dash This corner section was sectioned off the original dash then epoxied to the replacement cap. The other part of this patch . Center panel mold outside view Note=Black sheeting inside of the mold The outside view of the mold A lot of Duct Tape created a sturdy mold. The left side mold was constructed the same way Note -Bottom of the mold was left open otherwise the foam pressure would distort or damage it. This view shows the mold attached to the replacement dash cap with duct tape. This pic of the Right side lower section of the dash
  4. My dashboard was in bad shape as most of its early life( 71 to 83) it was parked outside all the time. This picture shows the dashboard broke into eight pieces when it fell on the work bench. Note-Huge cracks through out the dash board So first thing to do was to sandblast the small amount of corrosion of the frame of the dash. My Speed Blaster does a good blasting job on objects too big to fit in my sandblasting cabinet. Motorsport supplied the replacement dash cap for $120 but the old dash foam was so bad it would just crumble in your hands. So I decide to replace the dash foam. I decided to use the Motorsport dash cap and the existing dash frame as a mold. Then new foam would poured or injected into this mold. So now I had to seal off the metal part of the dash to be a part of the mold. Black shipping sheeting was utilized to wrap the dash. 3M General Spray Adhesive would sprayed on the frame to hold the sheeting in place. The biggest problem was the Motorsport replacement dash cap did not cover the lower section of the dash board. Four major molds would have to be created to fill in these areas. Using card board and duct tape were used to make the molds. The inside of the card board would be covered with the black sheeting to provide easy removal from the mold. There were some of the original dash sections that could be reused for this purpose View of the Right lower section of dash This corner section was sectioned off the original dash then epoxied to the replacement cap. The other part of this patch . Center panel mold outside view Note=Black sheeting inside of the mold The outside view of the mold A lot of Duct Tape created a sturdy mold. The left side mold was constructed the same way Note -Bottom of the mold was open otherwise the foam pressure would distort or damage it. This view shows the mold attached to the replacement dash cap with duct tape. This pic of the Right side lower section of the dash
  5. While awaiting some parts to come in, I decided to work on the two front headlight buckets. Right bucket is "before cleaning" and left is "after cleaning" The right bucket is "before cleaning" and left one is "after cleaning". This pic shows both head light buckets with light mounting cups. I was thinking of restoring these buckets with zinc chromate( yellowish gold plating) But found the zinc chromate is very toxic and hard to dispose of. So I am thinking of trying using metallic gold powder coating to recreate the coating. Checking to see if I can match the color. I ordered an Eastwood Powder Coating kit but it is on back order till February. So I went to work on the disassembly of the rear suspension. Of coarse, the most difficult part is the removal of the spindle pins. In our tropical climate here, I knew those pins would not slide easily. As I didn't want to spend $100 for the puller + freight, I decided to fabricate one. Went to Home Depot to gather all the parts. First, I migwelded a used wheel lug nut (12mm X1.25) to my 5/8" NC X14" threaded rod for the pulling screw. total view of 14" pulling screw Used a 1" ID steel fence post about 12" with 5/8" steel washer welded to one end of the pipe. aaa Note: the spindle pin shaft is on the top then the threaded pulling shaft then the pipe housing on the bottom. The threaded rod was screwed securely to the threaded end of the spindle pin. The round housing was installed over the tjhreaded screw. Then two additional 5/8" flat washers with grease between them was added to provide slippage under tension( a small bearing can be used too). Then the pulling nut is added. A 1/2 ratchet or 15/16" box wrench can used to turn down the pulling nut. For additional torque, a wrench extender or a long pipe can be utilized. Also, heating with a torch the cast iron area around the spindle locking pin will loose the corrosion if it is really stuck. Another important thing to make removal easier is the use of penetrating oil. After removing the two nuts and washers on both ends of the spindle pin, Place the suspension assembly so the pin is vertical as possible. Soak the top and between all cracks to get the penetrating oil in as possible. I seen mechanics make a cup around the top of spindle to create a reservoir to hold the oil. Leave the oil on as long as possible( even a week if necessary). The more oil that gets in, the easier the job will be. It will take a long time to turn that nut to pull out that 11" spindle pin considering one rotation of the nut probably moves the pin about 1/16" to 1/8" out. It will seem that way. The cost of the parts was about $20.
  6. While I was waiting for some parts to come in, I decided to work on the two front headlight buckets. A view of the back of the buckets. The right bucket is the "before cleaning" and the left is "after the cleaning". The right bucket shows the "Before cleaning" an
  7. View of the front lower bumper panels primed by poly primer. The bigger job was turned out to be the amber turn signal lens. Some of those tiny phillip screws(about 3mm) were rusted and had to be drilled out. Pic of broken lens mounting screws. At first, I used gray JB WELD expoxy to repair those lens mounting plastic studs. Then upon putting the lens cover on the housing, the gray epoxy created dark shallows in the lens. So I removed the gray epoxy and used JB WELD Clear Epoxy was utilized to eliminate this problem. The epoxy was dry to touch in a hour but waited till next day to drill and tap them. Those amber studs were recreated by using plastic straws and masking tape to make a mold for the epoxy. The straws were slit to go around the existing studs. Masking tape was applied tightly to seal and hold the mold while curing. Phillips 4-40 screws was found to be close enough to replace the rusted ones. The finished product
  8. Now that the underside of the 240z is painted with single stage polyurethane paint. the car could be removed from the rotisserie. I decided to construct a wooden dolly so the car could be move around the garage easily. used 2"x 6" planks and 3/4" plywood sheets to construct the dolly. The four metal 3" casters that were tack welded to the frame rails were reused and bolts to the 2" x 6" planks. Two 1"x 3" wood strips were screwed to the top of the dolly to prevent the car from slipping off the dolly. They run parallel outside of the frame rails. The car was removed from the rotisserie and place on the dolly. There were a few small parts that missed being epoxy primed so I started to work on them. The two front bumper panels were inspected. Only the right side had corrosion problems. Right panel had two rusted out sections. A paper template is created to the replacement section. Another template was made to repair the other section of the bumper panel. The template was traced on to make a sheet metal patch. Inside view of the mig welds expoxied to prevent corrosion. Outside view of bumper panel epoxied and will smooth over with body filler after epoxy primed.
  9. Happy Holidays!! I just returned from my trip to Japan. On the second to the Last Day there. I managed to go to the Nissan Global Head Quarters in Yokohama. It takes about a 40 minute train ride to get to Yokohama( located on the edge of Tokyo Bay). The car showroom is on the street level. Although there was a lot of new model Nissans, I went straight to Skyline GT area. There was a White 2018 Skyline GT-R Skyline GT-R on display. 20"Forgered alloy wheels and huge brakes They also had a complete cut way GT-R undercarriage on display. Twin cam 24 valve 3.8 Liter twin turbo engine rated at 600HP and 481 ft lbs torque. 5 speed automatic transmission with all wheel drive This is a cute Nissan mini van-not for Export though. They had a NISMO-High Performance section there too. Mostly t-shirts and promotional stuff but I found out there was a NISMO SERVICE CENTER near by. They have race cars on display there and do special work on customer cars too. It was only 15 minutes by taxi but I already had plans so could not make this time but will next time I am in Tokyo.
  10. Sorry for not posting in for a while. I was busy decorating my house for Christmas. Painted the bottom side and inside of the interior of the car. View of bottom of the front frame The bottom view of the floor pan and frame connectors. The rear of frame and bottom side of hatch area The interior floor and firewall was painted then the bottom side of the roof was painted too. The engine compartment and core support was covered with two coats of single stage polyurethane paint. View inside of the cowl area The spare tire well Only the interior of both doors, the hatch and front valance pan still have to be painted with single stage Polyurethane paint. The rest of the exterior parts of the car will be painted with polyurethane base color then clear coated. House Christmas decorations Snoopy and Star Wars theme
  11. toolman

    Pandem/Rocket Bunny Kit

    https://www.cyriousgarageworks.com/2017/09/06/rocket-bunny-240z-a-modern-classic/4/ This video shows a garage restoring a 240z and using a Rocket Bunny Body Kit. It has a very detailed and well done metal work. I also am deciding on what flares or body kit to use on my Z. Going to Japan for vacation so I plan to check if they have anything new over there. The first weekend of December there is a two day car show in Yokohama but I will miss it. There are a lot of Chinese copy cat Rocket Bunny kits on the market so beware. Japan has better fitting flares and body kits but are usually the most expensive too. Toolman
  12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVnxPL2oeQE&t=129s Found this video that goes in the mind of Kyle Kuhnhausen-Winner of 2018 SEMA SHOW Young Gun Builder. This 71 Datsun was made in his two car garage in period of 5 years. Toolman
  13. fluidmotion, , I am sorry, I forgot to answer your other question. I removed all of the factory seam sealer from my car. The old factory seal sealer was cracking and peeling off. The new poly seam sealer are much better than the old one(more flexible and resilient). For an even more through job, I sprayed seam sealer over areas prone to corrosion. Like the battery area where battery acid and flumes cause rapid corrosion on the metal. Then top coating the whole car(interior and exterior) with polyurethane paint(aircraft paint)which should last for 10+ years.
  14. fluidmotion, I used SEM PRODUCTS 1K sprayable seam sealer. It is a modified high performamce polmar silane seam sealer. It is OEM approved and used for Chrysler as a undercoating. .It is flexible and non sagging. Also, this sealer can be painted immediately after application. It comes in white, beige, gray and black colors. Amazon sells it for about $15 to $20. There is newer sprayable seam sealer 2K seam sealer( two part). Both sealers require a special spray gun to apply though.
  15. Finally got four more tubes of SEM PRODUCTS sprayable seam sealer. So now I could add two more coats of sealer on the bottom side of the passenger compartment. This would provide additional protection against heat and noise in this area. Note- the four casters for moving the car around the garage were removed. Once I finished painting the bottom of the car. the car will be removed from the rotisserie and place on jack stands. Save the casters to make HD dolly or another project Closeup up view of the seam sealer texture Seam sealer was sprayed on additional areas in the interior of the car. The rear underbelly also receive additional coats of seam sealer. Rear crossmember Rear bottom( spare tire well) Rear frame area another closeup view of seam sealer Trans tunnel and frame rails recoated Next step will spray painting the whole bottom and engine compartment with Sherwin Williams single stage polyurethane paint.
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