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Info on California Engine Swaps (BAR):

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waynekarnes    0

Gollum,

 

thanks !

 

your reply made perfect sense to me as well.

 

it's important knowledgeable people speak up when ever anyone is confused by the no smog test requirement rumors.

 

i left out quite a bit of the important details about swaps that you included.

 

guess, here at hybrid i have been parroting the " no, your car is not exempt from smog reduction devices requirements " so many times i am getting better at it. LOL

 

for those that don't know, there's a sticky here at hybrid on the ca. smog checks/laws and what's legal as well as a link to the ca. dmv web site.

 

i believe there is also info there on the smog laws in other states and countries as well.

 

legal disclaimer, your results may vary.

 

wayne.

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lesd    10

This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

So am I grandfathered with this sticker ?

Having said that, I am building a '96 LT1 turbo motor for the car. If a CHP or a street smog inspection trap pulls me over and pops the hood, I don't think they will like what they see. I do plan on keeping the 1964 327 around for good measure, if the 5hit really hits the fan :icon52:

 

Maybe pointing out the door sticker would help, but I don't know anymore. I'm going to baby that sticker from now on...

-L

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Gollum    23

Well, in all honesty you're doing the state a favor by putting a LT1 turbo in your car. It'll run cleaner and a lot more consistently clean at that.

 

But really, what are the odds of finding a smog inspec trap? I've never even SEEN one of those. Though I know the state is testing a system that can be installed on overpasses that will actually be able to point out cars that are creating obsessive smog and then take a picture of the license plate thus letting state send a friendly letter saying they have to see the ref.

 

They're trying to test the system and just stating to the victims that "you will not be charged or ticketed in any manor, this is for survey purposes only", though the actual success rate of people show up is something less than 10% I think.

 

But definitely baby that sticker, and definitely keep that motor around. IF there's ever an issue you just put it back in, then the choice is yours (and then you read between the lines of my post ;) )

 

Import guys have been doing it a long time now though. Those numerous 240SX cars with SR20s... they swap every other year. Too much work IMO.

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waynekarnes    0

Death69,

 

i wasn't trying to be a wise guy or shut you down. hope didn't come off that way. no one was born knowing this stuff, the 1st fool had to show the 2nd fool how to do it and so it goes. i'm just another fool in a long line of fools ! LOL

 

LESD,

 

name makes me think "lead sled" back from days when i hung out with customizers. they used lead instead of bondo then. many customs had many pounds of lead. low and slow, lead sleds.

 

anyway, your question: are you grandfathered.

 

as long as you leave your car as it was when the referree stuck the tag on the pillar of the car, your z is smog legal.

 

i also have a carb sticker on my 72 scarab. it states the smog equipment required on that engine and your car. it also states the year of the engine.

 

according to the laws back then, as long as had proper smog devices one could use any year engine from any make. laws have changed. now engine must be same age as chassis or newer.

 

your swap is grandfathered in, you can legally run an engine older than the chassis.

 

if you remove the pcv, reset the timing, put a non thermostatic controlled air cleaner on it, remove the air pump ( some counties in calif did not require em. my mom's 69 firebird, bought in '74, has never had a smog pump, was originally from so lake tahoe ), any way if you remove or alter smog devices , this is considered tampering and your car is no longer smog legal.

 

for your z as well as mine to remain technically legal, vehicle must retain all the devices that are stamped on that metal tag.

 

an engine swap will render your vehicle, nonconforming ( spell check says no such word as nonconforment ) and illegal.

 

to be made conforming, you would do the swap, take to referee to be checked. where upon, i believe you will be told to have all the smog controls the engine came with, including a cat or two. lonely old guy with all the cats.

 

yank the engine, store the smog devices ( mine are under my 58 vette ), store the engine if you think you must. i'd strip it to the short block and store the short block. if still too much for you. strip it down and save the block. just incase the anti car nazi's get into power you will be able to make your V8 z legal again.

 

i seriously doubt that anyone is gonna hassle you.

 

the boy racers in their hondas get hassled because they usually smell of ass. cops smell em and hear em miles away. act like an ass, cops is gonna yank you to the curb.

 

if suspects driver of street racing in his chain saw sounding car with red lights on front fenders and orange on the rear, officer just might ask to see under the hood, looking for that stolen v tech engine. local cops probably won't bother, chp most likely will. chp has some training on smog devices. most certainly recognize an illegal open element K&N filter. depending on attitude of ass behind the wheel and chp officer could be, pop goes the weasel. weasel gets to take coffee can exhaust car to smog station for test.

 

again, let your freak flag fly. won't encourage you to do anything illegal, no one here would even think of doing such as thing.

 

retain the old parts, swap in that cleaner running LT-1, help clean up our air and have every good intention of getting it in to your local carb certification center as soon as you have all the kinks worked out of it. because after all, you want it to be running its best and be presentable to the men and women doing the inspection at your friendly local carb certification center.

 

i am sure i am joining with everyone here, encouraging all of us to do the right thing.

 

simple answer, if you swap engines or tamper, you are no longer in compliance with the carb sticker affixed to your vehicle. vehicle is then, no longer smog legal.

 

sorry to take so long to get to such a short answer, had some time to kill.

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lesd    10

Wayne,

Mine has the pillar sticker, but it only states the year ( 1964 ) and the size ( 327 cu in ) of the engine. There is no list of smog devices. Is that list included on the same sticker on your car ?

My 327 has an open air filter, I don't know if it was BAR'ed with that, or if the previous owner had a totally stock looking engine during the BAR inspection.

 

I'm hoping that if I get pulled over with the new engine I am preparing, the turbocharged LT1 , the officer will be enough out of his element ( of dealing with ricer kids, etc ) and just be satisfied with the BAR sticker in the door.

But my new engine will certainly not have the 'thermostatically controlled air cleaner' ... :-D More like a bunch of intercooler plumbing and silicon hose couplers.

 

I'll keep the 327 and the 4 speed tranny all as a long block, ready to 'snap in' if I have to get it back for smog reasons.

I really don't want any of this type of trouble. There are heavy fines that can be imposed as well, I should remind everyone.

Another thing to worry about: The now can possess and crush ( that's right, CRUSH ) you can if they get you for 'street racing' .

American, the land of the free...

 

-Les

 

 

 

 

Death69,

 

 

LESD,

 

name makes me think "lead sled" back from days when i hung out with customizers. they used lead instead of bondo then. many customs had many pounds of lead. low and slow, lead sleds.

 

anyway, your question: are you grandfathered.

 

as long as you leave your car as it was when the referree stuck the tag on the pillar of the car, your z is smog legal.

 

i also have a carb sticker on my 72 scarab. it states the smog equipment required on that engine and your car. it also states the year of the engine.

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Gollum    23

As long as you're not "street racing" the fines CAN be as minimal as fix-it tickets though. A lot of it depends on the officer.

 

Does your engine label in the door state a vehicle it came from? If not then you've got a really awesome smog label that you REALLY need to baby.

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waynekarnes    0

Les,

 

your metal tag should show the make , year, cubic displacement, and type of trans, auto or manual.

 

below that are boxes the ref would stamp an X into all smog control devised that applied to your replacement engine.

 

i have same tag on my scarab. there should be a pic of it in my photo gallery.

 

oh, NEVER EVER say engine SWAP !!!

 

it's always a REPLACEMENT engine. this is important. the phrase engine swaps sets off all kinds of crazy alarms with the refs.

 

enuff of that.

 

you got your tag before the car haters at the carb bought themselves a legislator. thus your car is legal with an engine older than the chassis.

 

you are correct about the open element. i used to own a real 1970 LT-1 roadster. smog legal with open air element.

 

i would imagine that your tag must have the pcv marked. in california a pcv was required on all 1964 engines. if i remember correctly, 1960 was last year for a road tube. a road tube was used to vent moist air from the engine, was basically a long tube from off the block, had a couple screens in it to keep bugs out, ran from some where high on the block ( chevy was at rear of block near the dizzy ) down to the road.

 

the pcv routed to the air cleaner, so gases burned off instead of being dumped directly into the air. i think 1961 was 1st yr for pcv in calif. i know for sure by 1973 all 1955 and newer cars had to replace ( well small engines were exempt and most pre 1968 imports were exempt ) the road tube with a pcv to pass smog tests in calif.

 

anyway. with the sticker showing the smog controls you need, you are pretty much free to do most anything you want.

 

the only draw back is you need a 1964 engine to remain legal.

 

there are many blocks that have been decked and the codes on the front engine pad shaved off.

 

there are stamp kits available that allow one to restamp the engine codes back onto the pad.

 

this pad is normally where the smog inspectors check for the year of the engine. especially if you show up with an engine code book and show the inspector, see code on pad, see code in book, it's hard for them to dispute this evidence.

 

that said, there are date codes on the chevy engines that show the year, month, date and hour the engine block and heads were forged. most inspectors will not bother looking for these as they are usually difficult to see.

 

so, a block restamped with the proper codes is legal.

 

i believe, though the laws get changed by flakes that know nothing about cars so often i may be wrong, that : because your engine replacement was done before the laws changed forcing the use of same year or newer than the chassis. you are allowed to replace your worn engine with a newer one of the same family if the correct ( read as YEAR ) replacement is no longer available. meaning if smogged with small block chevy, you may replace it with same year or newer small block chevy. the smog controls would match the tag on the pillar tag, not the newer engine.

 

those who's replacement engines were certified after the same yr or newer rule went into effect, would be required to meet the smog device required by the year of the engine installed.

 

so, as i understand it, you can replace your irreplaceable 1964 327 with any small block chevy engine available to you and provided you retained the smog control devices required on the certificate tag.

 

this would include a turbo charged LT-1 small block.

 

unfortunately this info is not on the dmv website, you get this info from the books the smog refs use.

 

my uncle ( passed away while back ) used to have his smog license and built hi performance engines. he knew all the rules that allowed people to legally drive cars with his engines in em. this is where i obtained most of my info, plus several friends used to have smog test lic ( most couldn't afford to live here anymore and moved away ). an old neighbor works for CBAR ( calif bur of auto repair ). he knew the carb ( calif air resources bur ) smog laws inside and out. he was a mechanic that that ran cars through crooked repair shops as well as crooked smog test shops. acted as expert witness for the state. for a while i had his brain to pick and his ref books to look at.

 

in my opinion, i'd say you'd be fine running that LT-1 as long as it has smog controls matching what ever is marked on the metal tag.

 

wayne

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Gollum    23
i believe, though the laws get changed by flakes that know nothing about cars so often i may be wrong, that : because your engine replacement was done before the laws changed forcing the use of same year or newer than the chassis. you are allowed to replace your worn engine with a newer one of the same family if the correct ( read as YEAR ) replacement is no longer available. meaning if smogged with small block chevy, you may replace it with same year or newer small block chevy. the smog controls would match the tag on the pillar tag, not the newer engine.

 

I agree and I believe this is still the law.

 

One of my best friends worked for the local ref and now has his own smog shop. That's where I've gotten pretty much all my info. And for what it's worth this smog ref he worked for gets any of the people that other refs don't want to deal with, so they had a lot of unusual cases I got to hear about (and see, since they'd let me hang out there on slow days).

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waynekarnes    0

Gollum,

 

that's better than my experience.

 

i never got to hang out at the ref station. that would be a great education.

 

plus, i can imagine from what i saw years back while waiting to have my meyers manx dune buggy certified, there has got to be some real insanity among those bringing cars in to be certified. LOL

 

during the couple hours i was there, saw at least 3 refs get so p'off at people that they told driver he wasn't going to leave driving the car he had brought in, were told to call a tow truck because that was the only way the car was leaving the inspection station. this was backed up by armed CHP officer.

 

just maintain your cool, get temp operating permit and return later for another inspection.

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lesd    10

Wayne,

Thanks for your informative post!

I looked at your sticker, and it is pretty much the same as mine, but I only have the PVC box checked. Also, the B/A box has a B in it, whatever that means.

 

If it's true that I can legally swap in the LT1 , and only have the PVC valve, that would be rather amazing ! I would guess that you still can't add in enhancements like turbos and still have it legal. Since these laws only effect a very small group of people, ( read: nobody cares enough to patch the loophole) , maybe it would work.

 

How many HybridZ members have BAR stickers, I wonder?

 

-Les

 

 

 

 

 

(snip)

so, as i understand it, you can replace your irreplaceable 1964 327 with any small block chevy engine available to you and provided you retained the smog control devices required on the certificate tag.

 

this would include a turbo charged LT-1 small block.

 

wayne

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waynekarnes    0

Les, i will see if i can remember what that B/A is. i may be that timing retard device i was mentioning earlier. nox control ???

 

as far as the turbos go, to be strictly legal, look for turbos with a carb part number on em.

 

one of my younger brothers has a 69 chevy step side running a 600 plus hp small block boosted by a B&M super charger. though he no longer needs to , the truck passed smog with the blower on it. in case you are wondering, turbo 400 trans, i think diff 3:23 gears. at 75 mph, if he stands on it, trans drops into passing gear and both rear tires go up in smoke. B&M blower has carb numbers, his cam, headers, carb, ect, all carb approved.

 

think he bought the truck when he was a senior in high school, 1975. in his junior yr he had a 55 chevy 2 door hard top all metal, pull the both front wheels 3 to 4 inches off the ground. it as also smog legal ( back in 1974/75 ) cops pulled him over at least once a week on his way to high school ( leigh ), safety inspection and check for emission equipment violations. at he time my daily driver was a 65 chevelle fake SS. 327, corvette factory racing 3 speed trans, 3:90 posi. turned 12.49 120 mph on the 1/4 mi. oh yeah, you guessed it was also smog legal. traded it for a beat up 31 chevy pick up in 1976. almost sold it to Jungle Jim Liberman.

 

anyway, you can be legal with the turbos . especially with turbos being so common on imports. camaros were made in canada isn't the pt cruiser made in mexico ? it has turbos as an option. aren't both of them imports ?

 

i say, you should be able to have at least 2 turbos if you want em.

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Gollum    23

Yea, good luck on those carb approved turbos :D

 

The same buddy of mine with a smog shop has a JDM B16A motor in his honda, that' he's legalized (probably one of the few true legalized jap JDM motors in the bay) and he's been really made with greddy. You see, they spent all sorts of money to legalize the newer hondas for their new CARB approved turbos, and didn't fork over the money for the older hondas, regardless of NO engine change... So he's stuck having to go NA for legal HP since there's no TRUE legal force induction for a del sol (wich is what his car's label is designed around).

 

Though in this particular case I'm not sure how exactly THOSE laws work. It's all really confusing. If it's a big enough of an issue lesd, write up a quick summery of what your car is, what you want to do with it, and what would have to be done for it to be "legal" and I'll run to my buddies place real soon and see what he thinks.

 

I really don't understand though, around town turbos just help reduce emissions anyways. Why the state cares so much is beyond me. (everyone I've ever talked to that's done smog, would buy either an EVO or WRX for a "legal" sleeper, becuase they're AWD they don't get tested on the smog dyno, and becuase they're turbo you can get them to run perfectly clean at testing RPM with nearly limitless HP in the upper range)

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Just Jim    10
This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

 

I find all this smog requirement talk quite entertaining. Per the California laws posted an engine swap must use the same year or newer engine to be legal. Then how did a 1964 327 get a B.A.R sticker for a 1973 Z?

 

Maybe per the law an engine swap into a '75 or older vehicle must pass certain requirements but in the real word most pre '76 swaps are made with no regard to the law. Personally I'm not worried about the legality of the 302 Ford swap into my 240Z and neither are the thousands of other people who have made an engine swap into a pre '76 vehicle.

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lesd    10

My cars swap was done in the 1980's . The law was different then.

I'm not too worried either, but just as gun laws changed rather quickly, you never know what may happen to smog laws. Laws that only effect a small number of folks ( like guns, hot rods ) are easy to switch out on you.

So I'm protected a bit more with my grandfathered BAR sticker, I guess.

-Les

 

 

 

This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

 

I find all this smog requirement talk quite entertaining. Per the California laws posted an engine swap must use the same year or newer engine to be legal. Then how did a 1964 327 get a B.A.R sticker for a 1973 Z?

 

Maybe per the law an engine swap into a '75 or older vehicle must pass certain requirements but in the real word most pre '76 swaps are made with no regard to the law. Personally I'm not worried about the legality of the 302 Ford swap into my 240Z and neither are the thousands of other people who have made an engine swap into a pre '76 vehicle.

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CalifaThugz    10

2 month or so old thread but I dont think I have to worry about smog because my dad's friend is a manager or so for a smog place and he passed like 6 of our cars and like 10 of our friend's. To repair what was wrong would have costed us a couple hundred dollars but he says " come back on sunday and I'll pass your car for 110$ ."

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Tony D    143
This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

 

I find all this smog requirement talk quite entertaining. Per the California laws posted an engine swap must use the same year or newer engine to be legal. Then how did a 1964 327 get a B.A.R sticker for a 1973 Z?

 

 

"If the engine swap was conducted before May 1984' date=' pre and post dating of engines was allowable"

 

I know this as I tried to get a 71 L24 Induction/Exhaust system certified on my 73 when I moved here. When it was all said and done, it was clear Smog Laws were about perpetuating a bureaucracy and had very little to do with either common sense, nor clean air. My enraged last words to the referee after jumping through every hoop they put up, was 'Screw you, next time you see this car, it's going to have an LS3 454 Big Block in it from a 73 Corvette!' his reply was "Good, we can smog THAT!"

 

Grrrrrrr! Needless to say that was the last time I legally smogged the 73...

 

But to add something to this discussion, remember that there STILL exists a rolling exemption!

 

Yes indeed girls and boys, vehicles manufactured 35 years ago [i']and insured under collector car insurance[/i] no longer have a VISUAL INSPECTION FAIL CRITERION!

 

What that is to say is that my 1973 (if you do DMV Math) with the originally installed 71 SU system on it would only be required to pass a TAILPIPE smog check. VISUAL CRITERION IS DISMISSED because I have Haggerty Insurance on it. The pre-75 cars are a grey area, but the DMV was forced to this through lobbying on SEMA's part during the last round of SMOG madness.

 

When the 76's come due, though not technically approved, a standaone EFI that retained the Catalyst would pass the SMOG test required of it with an aftermarket FPR and Fuel Rail... As long as it passes clean out the pipe, which should not be a problem.

 

It's a little known quirk in the laws. If you have your car insured by Haggerty, or one of the other collector-car companies, remember this fact. They can't fail on visual criterion, the cars with colector car insurance are EXEMPT from a VISUAL FAILURE CRITERION.

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DavyZ    403

It's a little known quirk in the laws. If you have your car insured by Haggerty, or one of the other collector-car companies, remember this fact. They can't fail on visual criterion, the cars with collector car insurance are EXEMPT from a VISUAL FAILURE CRITERION.

 

Tony, that's excellent news :D I'm very happy to hear this, but where did you find out about it? Any links? This is to confirm it elsewhere.

 

Davy

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waynekarnes    0

other than to and from repair shops,

a collector car can only be driven to parades and club/car related functions.

 

in other words, not to work, not to grocery store. not to your friend's house. not even around the block because you felt like taking it out of the garage.

 

i went through this when i owned the 70 LT- 1 vette. dropped the coverage because i wanted to drive my car on daily basis.

 

i am sure the state won't get too excited but, haggarty will if finds out : fender bender in the target parking lot.

 

 

below is the statement about visual inspection.

 

was basically put in place so that museums could keep cars registered and not have to bother with chasing down functioning parts made of unobtainium to stay smog legal.

 

The bill would also provide that, commencing April 1, 2005,

defined collector motor vehicles for which proof of insurance is

submitted on that basis in accordance with regulations of the Bureau

of Automotive Repair, and that are at least 35 model-years old, shall

be subject to otherwise applicable exhaust emissions standards, but

shall not be required to pass a visual and functional inspection of

emission equipment, other than a functional inspection of the fuel

cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel leaks.

 

 

whole law is below

 

BILL NUMBER: AB 2683 ENROLLED

BILL TEXT

 

PASSED THE SENATE AUGUST 27, 2004

PASSED THE ASSEMBLY AUGUST 27, 2004

AMENDED IN SENATE AUGUST 26, 2004

AMENDED IN SENATE AUGUST 23, 2004

AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MAY 20, 2004

AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MARCH 24, 2004

 

INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Lieber

(Coauthor: Assembly Member Koretz)

(Coauthor: Senator Machado)

 

FEBRUARY 20, 2004

 

An act to amend Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code, and

to amend Sections 4000.1 and 4000.2 of the Vehicle Code, relating to

air pollution.

 

 

 

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

 

 

AB 2683, Lieber. Air pollution: smog check.

(1) Existing law establishes a motor vehicle inspection and

maintenance program (smog check), administered by the Department of

Consumer Affairs and the State Air Resources Board, that provides for

the inspection of all motor vehicles, except those specifically

exempted from the program, upon registration, biennially upon renewal

of registration, upon transfer of ownership, and in certain other

circumstances. Existing law requires the Department of Motor

Vehicles to require any motor vehicle subject to those requirements

to demonstrate compliance with those requirements. Existing law also

establishes an enhanced motor vehicle inspection and maintenance

program (smog check II) in each urbanized area of the state, any part

of which is classified by the United States Environmental Protection

Agency as a serious, severe, or extreme nonattainment area for

specified air contaminants. Existing law also requires the smog

tests to include, at minimum, loaded mode dynamometer testing in

enhanced areas, and 2-speed testing in all other program areas, and a

visual or functional check of emission control devices specified by

the department. Existing law exempted from those requirements, until

January 1, 2003, any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1974

model-year, and after that date, any motor vehicle that is 30 or more

model-years old.

This bill would instead, commencing April 1, 2005, exempt from the

smog check requirements, and the smog check compliance requirements,

any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1976 model-year.

Existing law exempts from existing smog check requirements, any

motor vehicle 4 or less model-years old and also exempts any motor

vehicle up to 6 model-years old, unless the state board determines

that the exemption would prohibit the state from meeting specified

requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

This bill would, commencing April 1, 2005, make the exemption for

any motor vehicle 4 or less model-years old inapplicable if the state

board makes those same determinations regarding the requirements of

the federal act.

 

 

The bill would also provide that, commencing April 1, 2005,

defined collector motor vehicles for which proof of insurance is

submitted on that basis in accordance with regulations of the Bureau

of Automotive Repair, and that are at least 35 model-years old, shall

be subject to otherwise applicable exhaust emissions standards, but

shall not be required to pass a visual and functional inspection of

emission equipment, other than a functional inspection of the fuel

cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel leaks.

 

 

 

(2) Under existing law, the Department of Motor Vehicles, with

certain exceptions, is required to obtain submission of a valid smog

check certificate of compliance or noncompliance, as appropriate, in

order to register a motor vehicle previously registered outside the

state. Among other exemptions, from this requirement, existing law

exempts 1965 or earlier model-year motor vehicles.

This bill, commencing April 1, 2005, would instead apply the

model-year exemption that is applicable to vehicles registered in

this state. The bill would also make technical clarifying changes.

(3) Existing law makes any violation of the smog check

requirements a misdemeanor.

To the extent that the bill would impose the smog check

requirements on additional vehicles on and after April 1, 2005, this

bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the

scope of a crime.

(4) This bill would render inoperative on and after April 1, 2005,

the amendments to Sections 43843 and 44004 of the Health and Safety

Code proposed by SB 1615, if this bill is enacted after SB 1615.

(5) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse

local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the

state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that

reimbursement.

This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this

act for a specified reason.

 

 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

 

 

SECTION 1. (a) It is the intent of the Legislature, in enacting

the act adding this section, to ensure that vehicles, of the 1975

model-year and older are permanently exempted from the biennial

compliance requirement of the motor vehicle inspection and

maintenance (smog check) program.

(B) It is further the intent of the Legislature to ensure that the

Department of Motor Vehicles and the Department of Consumer Affairs

have adequate time to comply with the requirements of the act adding

this section by delaying the operation of the act until April 1,

2005.

SEC. 2. Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to

read:

44011. (a) All motor vehicles powered by internal combustion

engines that are registered within an area designated for program

coverage shall be required biennially to obtain a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance, except for all of the following:

(1) Every motorcycle, and every diesel-powered vehicle, until the

department, pursuant to Section 44012, implements test procedures

applicable to motorcycles or to diesel-powered vehicles, or both.

(2) Any motor vehicle that has been issued a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance or a repair cost waiver upon a change of

ownership or initial registration in this state during the preceding

six months.

(3) Any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1976 model-year.

(4) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), any motor vehicle

four or less model-years old.

(B) Beginning January 1, 2005, any motor vehicle six or less

model-years old, unless the state board finds that providing an

exception for these vehicles will prohibit the state from meeting the

requirements of Section 176© of the federal Clean Air Act (42

U.S.C. Sec. 7401 et seq.) or the state's commitments with respect to

the state implementation plan required by the federal Clean Air Act.

 

© Any motor vehicle excepted by this paragraph shall be subject

to testing and to certification requirements as determined by the

department, if any of the following apply:

(i) The department determines through remote sensing activities or

other means that there is a substantial probability that the vehicle

has a tampered emission control system or would fail for other cause

a smog check test as specified in Section 44012.

(ii) The vehicle was previously registered outside this state and

is undergoing initial registration in this state.

(iii) The vehicle is being registered as a specially constructed

vehicle.

(iv) The vehicle has been selected for testing pursuant to Section

44014.7 or any other provision of this chapter authorizing

out-of-cycle testing.

(5) In addition to the vehicles exempted pursuant to paragraph

(4), any motor vehicle or class of motor vehicles exempted pursuant

to subdivision (B) of Section 44024.5. It is the intent of the

Legislature that the department, pursuant to the authority granted by

this paragraph, exempt at least 15 percent of the lowest emitting

motor vehicles from the biennial smog check inspection.

(6) Any motor vehicle that the department determines would present

prohibitive inspection or repair problems.

(7) Any vehicle registered to the owner of a fleet licensed

pursuant to Section 44020 if the vehicle is garaged exclusively

outside the area included in program coverage, and is not primarily

operated inside the area included in program coverage.

(B) Vehicles designated for program coverage in enhanced areas

shall be required to obtain inspections from appropriate smog check

stations operating in enhanced areas.

© For purposes of subdivision (a), any collector motor vehicle,

as defined in Section 259 of the Vehicle Code, is exempt from those

portions of the test required by subdivision (f) of Section 44012 if

the collector motor vehicle meets all of the following criteria:

(1) Submission of proof that the motor vehicle is insured as a

collector motor vehicle, as shall be required by regulation of the

bureau.

(2) The motor vehicle is at least 35 model-years old.

(3) The motor vehicle complies with the exhaust emissions

standards for that motor vehicle's class and model-year as prescribed

by the department, and the motor vehicle passes a functional

inspection of the fuel cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel

leaks.

SEC. 3. Section 4000.1 of the Vehicle Code is amended to read:

4000.1. (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (B), ©,

or (d) of this section, or subdivision (B) of Section 43654 of the

Health and Safety Code, the department shall require upon initial

registration, and upon transfer of ownership and registration, of any

motor vehicle subject to Part 5 (commencing with Section 43000) of

Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, a valid certificate of

compliance or a certificate of noncompliance, as appropriate, issued

in accordance with Section 44015 of the Health and Safety Code.

(B) With respect to new motor vehicles certified pursuant to

Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 43100) of Part 5 of Division 26 of

the Health and Safety Code, the department shall accept a statement

completed pursuant to subdivision (B) of Section 24007 in lieu of the

certificate of compliance.

© For purposes of determining the validity of a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance submitted in compliance with the

requirements of this section, the definitions of new and used motor

vehicle contained in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 39010) of

Part 1 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code shall control.

(d) Subdivision (a) does not apply to a transfer of ownership and

registration under any of the following circumstances:

(1) The initial application for transfer is submitted within the

90-day validity period of a smog certificate as specified in Section

44015 of the Health and Safety Code.

(2) The transferor is the parent, grandparent, sibling, child,

grandchild, or spouse of the transferee.

(3) A motor vehicle registered to a sole proprietorship is

transferred to the proprietor as owner.

(4) The transfer is between companies whose principal business is

leasing motor vehicles, if there is no change in the lessee or

operator of the motor vehicle or between the lessor and the person

who has been, for at least one year, the lessee's operator of the

motor vehicle.

(5) The transfer is between the lessor and lessee of the motor

vehicle, if there is no change in the lessee or operator of the motor

vehicle.

(6) The motor vehicle was manufactured prior to the 1976

model-year.

(7) Beginning January 1, 2005, the transfer is for a motor vehicle

that is four or less model-years old. The department shall impose a

fee of eight dollars ($8) on the transferee of a motor vehicle that

is four or less model-years old. Revenues generated from the

imposition of that fee shall be deposited into the Vehicle Inspection

and Repair Fund.

(e) The State Air Resources Board, under Part 5 (commencing with

Section 43000) of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, may

exempt designated classifications of motor vehicles from subdivision

(a) as it deems necessary, and shall notify the department of that

action.

(f) Subdivision (a) does not apply to a motor vehicle when an

additional individual is added as a registered owner of the motor

vehicle.

(g) For purposes of subdivision (a), any collector motor vehicle,

as defined in Section 259, is exempt from those portions of the test

required by subdivision (f) of Section 44012 of the Health and Safety

Code, if the collector motor vehicle meets all of the following

criteria:

(1) Submission of proof that the motor vehicle is insured as a

collector motor vehicle, as shall be required by regulation of the

bureau.

(2) The motor vehicle is at least 35 model-years old.

(3) The motor vehicle complies with the exhaust emissions

standards for that motor vehicle's class and model year as prescribed

by the department, and the motor vehicle passes a functional

inspection of the fuel cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel

leaks.

SEC. 4. Section 4000.2 of the Vehicle Code is amended to read:

4000.2. (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (B) of

Section 43654 of the Health and Safety Code, and, commencing on April

1, 2005, except for model-years exempted from biennial inspection

pursuant to Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code, the

department shall require upon registration of a motor vehicle subject

to Part 5 (commencing with Section 43000) of Division 26 of the

Health and Safety Code, previously registered outside this state, a

valid certificate of compliance or a certificate of noncompliance, as

appropriate, issued in accordance with Section 44015 of the Health

and Safety Code.

(B) For the purposes of determining the validity of a certificate

of compliance or noncompliance submitted in compliance with the

requirements of this section, the definitions of new and used motor

vehicle contained in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 39010) of

Part 1 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code shall control.

SEC. 5. The amendments to Sections 43843 and 44004 of the Health

and Safety Code proposed by Senate Bill 1615, if enacted, shall not

be operative.

SEC. 6. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to

Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because

the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school

district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or

infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty

for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the

Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the

meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California

Constitution.

SEC. 7. This act shall become operative on April 1, 2005.

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waynekarnes    0

oh almost forgot.

 

most collector car insurance companies will not insure modified collector cars.

 

when bought the 70 LT-1 had hooker headers and big chrome side pipes ( i removed em. were ugly loud and damn hot ).

 

haggerty would not insure it with the side pipes. also wanted to know on application form, if had modifications IE: high performance camshaft, non stock carb, engine swap, suspension modifications, brakes, ect.

 

they do have a class for modified vehicles.

rules at the time, and as they have gotten stricter i am sure rules are the same ; modified vehicles must be trailered to events. may only be driven at sanctioned events or on private property and never on any public roadways. burger pit parking ( ect ) lots are considered public accessible roadways, therefore modified vehicle may not be operated/driven in parking lots.

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waynekarnes    0

the crate engine usually has a spec as to the years the engine is applicable.

 

company selling crate engine shows range of years the engine may replace.

 

generally, this is what the state will use as the year of the engine.

 

if engine is not new. instead is a rebuilt, check the casting date on the block.

 

the casting date will be used by the state to determine the date of manufactuer and smog requirements.

 

 

 

if there is no spec application implied as when using a racing engine, you may find that CARB will disallow the use of the engine ( racing application, not designed to be used on the highway ).

 

most replacement engines come with a CARB ( california air resources bureau ) certification.

 

you should be safe if using any of the certified engines.

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S30 SPL    9

Just to add a little something...

 

Intercooler replacements on vehicles that were originally equipped with some sort of intercooler is CARB exempt and do not require approval or additional testing. This covers a small side mount to a huge front mount.

 

Also, the current laws state (if I am not mistaken) that you can not replace your current engine with one with additional cylinders. For example, if you have a I-6, you can not drop in a V8. The engine also has to come from the same brand of vehicle (Nissan to a Nissan, no Toyota in a Nissan).

 

I have swapped and BAR'd a few Honda vehicles and all have had first time passes except for one that had an A/F ratio gauge. The A/F gauge is illegal because it taps/alters an essential ECM signal.

 

SR20DET swap in a 240SX will never be legal. However, you may be able to get a SR20DE in a 240SX. A loop hole may be possible since the G20 and Sentra had SR20 options, but the US has never had a turbo version of this engine.

 

Unfortunately, I have a 1977 Z so I need to comply and get tested. BUT I have always been curious about the RB being a legal swap because the Skyline was imported by Motorex for a period of time. This means that the RB engine series WAS available in the USA legally...

 

Of course, all my comments are only intended to apply to CA laws.

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Guest [email protected]   
Guest imperial562@yahoo.com

 

Referee inspection:

Pre-75 vehicles (vehicles not requiring smog tests) do not have to be referee certified. However, CHP (or any law enforcement officer, I suppose) can write you an emissions citation, which would need a visit to the referee to sign off to cancel the citation (fixit ticket). Apparently, the State is actively looking at modified vehicles for emissions violations (roadside checkpoints as mentioned previously)

 

 

As of 2008?if yes.. then could I say that 2009 law will be Pre-76 vehicles that dont need smog?

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