Jump to content
HybridZ

rejracer

Donating Members
  • Content Count

    422
  • Donations

    50.00 USD 
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2
  • Feedback

    0%

rejracer last won the day on October 23 2013

rejracer had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

12 Good

About rejracer

  • Rank
    HybridZ Supporter

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Roseville, CA

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Put a timing light on it to check where #1 is firing. Based on that alone, you will be able to correct the problem. At worst it will be 120* off if you are off by 1 terminal on the cap. If you move them over 1 and it still wont start, you have one other option (2 in the opposite direction) And lastly, did you verify the direction the rotor is traveling while cranking?
  2. New carb installation? Check for Vacuum leaks! Pull air cleaner(s) and confirm Throttle plate movement, as well as vacuum piston is operating. Check that both carb float bowls have fuel. Check ignition firing order, and timing. If it ran before you pulled the carbs off, it will run now once you find the (most likely) very basic problem. On the 260z's the casting plugs on the EGR portion of the manifold tend to rot out creating a massive vacuum leak. The casting plug iirc is on the backside of the manifold, between the manifold and the valve cover so they are hard to see/find. Casting plugs can be found cheap at your local napa.
  3. 1. Quit buying parts. 2. Troubleshoot. Start with: Clean the ECU, head temp sensor, and AFM pins and connectors. Use Deoxit D5, followed by Deoxit G5. Visually (and carefully) inspect all pins. If that does not work, just bite the bullet, and buy a new car. It will be cheaper in the long run than rebuilding what you have by buying one part at a time. How do you know which cylinders were rich vs lean? Can you post a pic of the sparkplugs?
  4. I like the idea, I want to do something similar on my setup.
  5. Got the P90a and manifolds, everything packed up nicely. Thanks Austen
  6. The TC rod pivot point on the front control arms is behind the control arm. When braking the compressive loads will want to rotate the control arm. Granted the AZC implementation is the best of these flawed designs because it is such a thick piece. The same basic design could be made much better by moving the pivot point forward to the center of the control arm. Actually my original rant on these is based on ignorant people wanting to put these on daily driven street cars and not inspecting them. The design is good (AZC design only) if kept in good condition. But when the bore that the compression rod bolt goes through wears, and it's just a matter of time, the same twisting will occur under braking. The big problem with a front control arm or compression arm failure is that it usually ends up in a spectacular accident with much damage done to the chassis. With the rear design when it fails at least the strut does not collapse under the car, it's just moved way out of alignment. Once again, my comments concerning this design are in application. The front design is fine for racers who inspect the car after each race. Does that articulate the problem I see in the TC Pivot point location?
  7. Yes. It's typical of many aftermarket offerings: Wonderful execution of really bad ideas. It is just irresponsible to put these on the market. The design flaw is BASIC engineering, and obvious at first glance with minimal understanding of the loads seen by the suspension. I don't know what is worse this rear design or the AZC front design. I've ranted on those before, suffice to say they have the same problem, 3 pivot points.
  8. 280zx calipers are the only ones I would use as they have larger piston area than the 240sx and Maxima. They are a pretty good match for stock fronts. With the early maxima bracket they are bolt on and are aligned correctly. They feel great with the stock master cylinder. I've been running the 280zx rear setup for 10 years now, and It's a good stock level setup. If the 12+8 calipers have more piston area than the stock Z calipers I would think it's going to be too much front bias. You'd be surprised how good properly setup stock brakes feel and perform, but the key is front to rear balance. Don't bother with uber large master cylinders, brake boosters or calipers as they are not needed unless road or track racing. The later front wheel drive maxima bracket is the one that is out of alignment, and needs proper machine work to get it done correctly. Why bother with all that hassle for a smaller piston?
  9. Rear rotors and calipers + early maxima bracket is a bolt on rear disk conversion.
  10. With a -25 offset the wheel will rub the stock fenders, I don't know for sure if rolling will fix that. Going from +10 to -25 is over an inch to the outside of the vehicle so really I doubt it. How did you come up with -25 offset wheels would fit? a +25 16x8 will rub the spring perch, unless the bottom of the spring perch is above the tire. Your inner tire will also rub on the inner fender lip, the one on the lower edge. To give you a better idea: +4 can be run in the rear, but requires spacers in the front, or you will rub coilovers. Anything more than + 10 and you will be rubbing front and rear on the coilovers. With +10 if you carry a 200lb load in the back compartment and have a 200 lb passenger you will rub the rear fenders every so often going over bumps. 16x8+10 with a 225-50 tire is just about maxed out on a stock fendered car. With that said, how much clearance will rolling give you? I've never rolled fenders before. Thanks.
  11. To fit coilovers you need to cut off the old perches and weld on new at the right height. A 10" wide 0 offset will have about 25 to 30mm interference with 2.5" coil overs. If you were to put a 8" spring and be able to clear the tire, you still might be hitting the strut tube, Not to mention the reduced turning radius. If you want to start engineering, I suggest getting a tape measure and get under the car. With that said I have experience with a 225-50-16 on a + 10 offset wheel. Benefits of the 225-50-16 on an 8" wide +10 offset wheel: The biggest tire you can run under stock fenders. (but still need coil overs) Can run the same size front and rear with the same offset. It's the cheapest tire size available in the range of use for a Z car. It has the most selection of tires on the market today. (at least here in the US) It's the same diameter as the stock tires (24.9 to 25"), so the speedo is correctly calibrated. No spacers required (front or rear) Good sidewall height for use on rough roads In other words the 225-50-15 is a great tire for street use. If you are racing, there may be better choices. If you want wider and are flaring go for it, but for traction, stability and safety, fit the right size tire to the correct rim. 225's should be mounted on a 6 to 8" rim per most manufacturers. Mismatched rim/tire combo's don't support the sidewalls correctly, and traction goes DOWN. It boggles my mind why you spend so much money on mismatched tires/wheels, don't do it!. To fit a 10" rim, your wheel will need a lot of back spacking or spacers, something in the range of +35 to clear 2.5" coil overs, depending on your exact coil over kit and rim selected. Not to mention a minimum of 255 width tire.
  12. The bosch 040 pump is an internal pump, from what i've read its the internal version of the 044. I've been wanting to do an internal pump on it for some time now.
  13. Have you tried MSA, BHJ or rebello racing?
  14. I'm looking for a turbo exhaust manifold and the T3 oil drain flange / adapter.
  15. The other method is heating it with a torch or high output heat gun. The dry ice method is much cleaner. When done right the body takes no damage. If it does, your either hitting it too hard, or the floors need to be replaced anyway.
×
×
  • Create New...