Jump to content
HybridZ

AC system copper flared lines


Recommended Posts

I couldn't find a forum for this exactly, so I'll try here.

Are the flared copper fittings on the 280z ac lines reusable? Will 134a leak through or should I use r12a (not r12) instead? They seem like they may not reseal well, anyone have any experience with this, and hopefully some tips?

Thank you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't find a forum for this exactly, so I'll try here.

Are the flared copper fittings on the 280z ac lines reusable? Will 134a leak through or should I use r12a (not r12) instead? They seem like they may not reseal well, anyone have any experience with this, and hopefully some tips?

Thank you!

I converted my system to R134 several years ago and it's still going strong - the copper lines have not been a problem..  You will want to flush the entire system to get the old oil out (I used mineral oil as I recall), and replace the dryer and pressure switch with r134 compatible ones.  

 

Also use the ester compressor oil, not the PAG stuff - it's designed to be more compatible with r12 to r134 conversions.  If you decide to use any additives like "stop leak" or whatever, check to be sure that it does not contain PAG oil - it's not compatible with ester.

Edited by TimZ
Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't find a forum for this exactly, so I'll try here.

Are the flared copper fittings on the 280z ac lines reusable? Will 134a leak through or should I use r12a (not r12) instead? They seem like they may not reseal well, anyone have any experience with this, and hopefully some tips?

Thank you!

 

I'm an old school plumber & HVAC tech so I actually prefer copper refer tubing with standard flare fittings to the o-ring stuff they use on newer cars.  Done properly, they hold tight and are easy to replace or repair.  Make sure both sides of the flare on the tube are clean and use a little or your refrigerant oil on both surfaces (interior and exterior of the tubing end).  Snug the flare nut up - always use two wrenches - and don't over-tighten.  The tubing and flare fittings will last nearly forever if they're not abused.

 

After you get some pressure in the system, you can check for leaks with soapy water in a spray bottle.  They make commercial products for gas leak detection too, but some "Dawn" (or other liquid dish soap) mixed with water works just as well.  Spray the joints and look for bubbles...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...