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Gollum

Gollum's DD L28ET 75'

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Not much done tonight but I spent some time cleaning. The below pic represents a lot of work, despite a lot left to do.

 

I also started going through the first parts bin and found a lot of things I'd need, so that's hopeful. A lot of things just need to go away. Garbage bin will be full this week...

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Small update:

 

So I've found my missing cam inspection cover as well the thermostat housing. Also reconnected the coolant inlet at the rear of the head. Dizzy cap is back on, as well as the coil. I'll be using MS's built in ignition driver so I've removed the OEM ignition module from the bracket. Radiator is back in too.

 

Little by little.

 

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My wiring still isn't 100%, bit it's near enough I'm not so ashamed of it. The loom routing is a bit of a mess, and if I did it all over with $300 to blow on dedicated wiring supplies I'd have done it differently. All in all, not bad for 90% recycled supplies from donor cars (other than the diyautotune wiring which was loathsome to work with).

 

Still need to tape the driver side engine harness, as well as some of the other bits, but you get the idea.

 

One less todo before drivable.

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Car's running pretty good, despite tuning without a wideband for the tine being. I'm still regularly tidying little things up, and it's coming along.

 

I've got the wheels in my car so I can drop them at the tire shop later today with my "new" (been sitting in the garage forever) tires to be mounted. That's a huge milestone to making the thing driveable.

 

I also need to attach the hood, and I ditched the front brackets a long time ago, so hood pins it is. You might say it's because I'm cheap, but I think it's also due to just wanting to get something done and not bother with buying something, I'm making my own hood pins. I think the bolts are old LCA bolts. They're plenty strong enough in any case, and I've got all four mounted on the chassis side. Now I just need to cut them down enough so I can rest the hood in place and get some marks to drill.

 

Once tires and hood are on, I'm going to do a quick alignment, put the air dam on, and she's pretty close to road worthy!

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I'm not sure why I thought it was a good idea, but I went ahead and made my own hood pins. I doubt I "saved" money even if my time was free, since I'm likely going to go buy a kit of clips to replace my temporary clip solution. The pins themselves turned out okay, and the hood fitment is passable. My lower pin placement ended up spot on which is great since they'll take the brunt of the lifting load, but the rear's I didn't take my time with enough and I ended up putting my holes in about 1/4" or more too high (towards the windshield. This caused a lot more work than necessary getting it to fit decently, and larger holes than preferable, but I'm not sure I really care as long as it stays on tight.

 

Also spent time yesterday mounting my own tires on my wheels. Not exactly fun, but with decent manual tools it's not too painful (even the harbor freight stand isn't the worst thing in the world). Reason I ended up doing this myself is because though my tires I had already looked fantastic, had been out of the sun in a garage their whole life, and never under extreme temperatures, they were more than 6 years old (close to 10 years actually) and thus no shop in the area wanted to touch them. I don't plan on doing any competitive racing on them, or any serious street shenanigans, but they'll likely be fine for daily driving for a year or two, which is all as long as I need them to last.

 

I ordered speed bleeders because I still felt my brakes were a bit mushy and wanted to be able to bleed them myself with confidence. Boy do these things work great! I can't say enough about them. Lucky me with the S13 rear brakes I use the same bleeder on all four corners which is handy, and once installed I was able to bleed my brakes myself in about 5 minutes. Granted, the car was already on stands with all four wheels off, but you get the picture.

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So my battery still needed some work to be mounted a bit more "properly" compared to how I had it last time I was daily driving this car. My "long term" goal was to square out the passenger foot well and make a little enclosure for it with panel mount terminals. This would make it racing body legal, but also putting the weight as low as possible, while being between the wheels. I'm not a huge fan of putting the battery up high in the back, as I don't NEED more weight in the back per se, since I can always tune the front/back grip with the same measures it'd take to balance the car if I put all the weight in the back. Anyway, I'm rambling.

 

So I still had a ton of dynamat on the floorpans from a PO (I think it was hybridz member FlatBlack or it had to have been before him even maybe). I didn't want to look at even a temporary riveted or bolted in solution for a tray in the eventual battery space to be with the crap in the way. Well, so I got to removing the dynamat... and just.... yeah.

 

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Nice hole up in the top right of the image, and I have to wonder if dynamat was intended to just hide rust that someone didn't want to repair. I haven't had the car stored outside, I've never seen/had standing water in the floor... Yet... Healthy rust, growing like mold in a forgotten fridge.

 

And to add some insult to the mix, I confirmed a suspicion that my floors weren't exactly flat.

 

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And after some more grinding (flap disk) , more sound deadening removal, and more grinding (flat disk), and the some pounding, I have a more flat floor, and a heavy desire to go buy a wire wheel for the angle grinder. All my existing wire wheels are for drills or die grinders. Which, I guess I could use the die grinder with a wire wheel, I'd just be running the compressor pretty hard for a few hours to get this really cleaned up.

 

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So, I'm really tempted to wire wheel the rest of the rust away, cut and weld the minimal spots, spray on some weld-through primer, and build a temporary battery mount where I want it to end up. That "temporary" solution is likely kicking the can down a year or two at the rate I've been going this last year, but I think I'm okay with that. I'm not building this to sell, or for someone else. And I'm not going to be competing in it anytime soon. I'm going to be driving it, putting miles on it, to work, to play, etc. I'm mostly just interested in "safe" and "don't lose objects to the road through the floor" status.

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Sux.  I know the feeling all too well.  The PO of my car filled holes in the frame rails and corresponding holes in the floorboard with Great Stuff then covered them with dynamat.  He told me with a straight face that the frame rails and floor pans were "solid."   

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Well, in his defense, expanding urethane foam can be pretty "solid" stuff! :-)

 

I'm not all that upset, and it's not like I ever felt this was a completely rust free car... It's just a "well I guess this is the state of things". The front chassis ears where the hood hinges mount are all rusted out, my fenders have rust in the rocker area. and there's other mild signs of rust elsewhere. My interest in digging into the problem is low, largely because I don't have welding equipment (yet), and no interest in fixing for the sake of "pretty".

 

That said, if I'm going to work on a part of the car, I might as well do what I can while I'm in there.

Edited by Gollum

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9 hours ago, rossman said:

Sux.  I know the feeling all too well.  The PO of my car filled holes in the frame rails and corresponding holes in the floorboard with Great Stuff then covered them with dynamat.  He told me with a straight face that the frame rails and floor pans were "solid."   

 

Oh man. I thought I was alone with a PO that crazy. My PO "repaired" the floor boards with a harbor freight welder and Great Stuff in all the holes. 

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It really is hard to imagine it being MORE work to just replace the whole pan from the right edge of the faux rail to the rocker and from the firewall to the seat rail.

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There's definitely some decent pitting in other unmarked areas but they seem solid enough that I'd be happy with a rust converter and some paint. But after patching those four sections I'll have already done a fair bit of metal shaping and welding.

 

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Shes idling nice. I would get a wideband in there as soon as you can. If you need connectors, for coils , injectors or any of the sensors I have those in stock. 

 

With that much patch work I would go with full floors or atleast front one big patch it will look much better. How does it lookI know the 280 fuel lines run on the floor vs 240z so something to think about. How does it look behind seats?

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If the integrity of the seat mounts and frame rail is not affected by the rust, I'd patch.  Especially if you're not worried about aesthetics.  I replaced my Swiss cheese floors mainly because the rust was in all the edges of the rail underneath and the front seat mount.  I also cut the roof off so I needed the floors to be solid along with the addition of stiffening tubing.  It looks great, but it's a lot more involved than patching. 

I have a cheap flux core wire feed welder you can borrow if you'd like.  It's what I used to do my floors.

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Yeah, I need to remove my seats to be sure, but when I put them back in not that long ago I don't remember noticing any major rust. I'll likely just end up doing some patching. As far as a welder, thanks for the offer. Someone else also offered me long-term borrowing of a flux core so we'll see how that works out. I also have a neighbor willing to let me bring the car over to do some welding, but that would mean needing to have a set of patches fitting and ready. If I have a welder handy, I'm going to also go about plugging the corner light holes, maybe cleaning up the rear bumper area, etc. So having a few winter months to peck away at the problem might be ideal.

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More dynamat and factory floor liner removed.

 

I think I'm going to call my car "rust free" because my rust runs wild like free roaming cattle. Some people call rust cancer, but I've taken to calling it anorexia. And while anorexia is bad in general, it's kind of dismissed in some lines of work and/or social settings, right?

 

 

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On the bright side, I think I can install 20 lbs worth of intercom equipment and still be WELL under the weight removed from all this crap. I've filled two paper grocery bags thus far with the sticky goop. Each one was at least 15lbs or so.

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So I didn't have much of an "idea" for what should be on my christmas list. Then I realize that my "car list" on amazon was 90% low buck items that I just hadn't gotten around to ordering. So I transferred all the items over and told the family to have at it. Got around to installing one of the gifts from the wife.

 

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Wired up the Angel DRL as an always-on DRL. Could be configured to a manual switch, but then it'd also need to be tied into the turn indicator circuit as it's required for the amber indication. So always-on was easy and meets my goal of being noticed on the road. I don't exactly trust other drivers...

 

 

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And there's the amber. It's tirgger wire is hooked into the flasher circuit output I built and the headlamp handles a graceful transition from amber to off and takes about 2 seconds to go back to white so you get a nice high contrast OFF/Amber when signaling, same as all the modern cars do.

 

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And that's low beam. I oriented the lamp to have the DOT label face up, position on the bottom, which puts the wiring plug at the bottom of the back. I THINK that's correct, but I'll verify once I got the beams shooting more than 3 feet.

 

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And there's high beams. No need to run LOW+HIGH on your circuit with these. High will bridge low so you can use a single relay to toggle NORM-OPEN and NORM-CLOSED between hi-low if you wanted. I wired my circuit so HIGH has both circuits on, because the old lamps I had were that way, but leaving it as such shouln't be an issue.

 

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You can see there's a bit of color wash with high beams on trying to indicate, but to the human eye it's still pretty visible. That said, why are you indicating while flashing high beams?

 

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Low beams have very nice contrast while signaling. Something the last pair of cheap headlights I bought with turn signals DIDN'T do. But those were also still halogen lamps and I think were like $60/pair.

 

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I knew I'd been playing around with the electrical system a lot without running the car, and my battery is on it's last legs so voltage would be down. This is the other side with low beams on.... Plugged my battery charger in and it read the battery at 47%.... So voltage was pretty low. That said, even with the engine running, driving at night was... not fun.

 

EDIT: Forgot to mention, you can run these without the DRL on with high/low beams on if you wanted. My headlight power source bypasses my main relay as a safety concern so I can easily kill everything and keep headlights as well as turn signals, and verified the Angel circuit is completely separated from the main beams other than sharing ground from the main connector. So, wire up as you desire.

 

If you were chasing ounces, these are heavier. No doubt. In theory my MAX electrical load went down a good bit I bet, but I'd have to measure to be sure. Advertisements says high is 60 watts, but I'm not entirely sure that's accurate. Also, I think the front is glass. It's certainly not a cheap/light plastic. You could save a lot of weight compared to these using an all plastic housing with a lightweight halogen lamp.

 

Exact Amazon Item:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FS617J8

 

And since that link will likely die in time, the description:

LIMICAR 2PCS 7" High Low Sealed Beam Led Headlights White DRL/Angel Eyes & Amber Turning Signal Lights Round Headlamps for Jeep Wrangler JK CJ TJ Hummer H1 H2 Truck 4x4 Off-Road Headlights Assembly

 

 

You'll see my review on that amazon page, and I really do mean it: these are great for the price. I've seen a lot of guys saying you need to spend $500+ to get nice headlamp units, but I just don't see what that cost difference gets you. If these last 5 years, I can still buy 4+ of them before I've spent what other say I need to spend in order to get "quality" units.

 

Also, here's another "cheap christmas item" that I'll be installing soon:

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I'm not thrilled with how low those sit, and will likely fab up a wedge shaped washer/spacer that I may or may not weld to the door to bring the angle up. Right now, I don't like how swinging the mirror to see closer to the car or farther away creates height differences, so I'll try to target a level swing on that rotating plane. This might make the upper arch of the mirror slightly awkward, but meh. Does anyone here actually think I care that much about form?

Edited by Gollum

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Posted (edited)

Also, because my curiosity was nagging, I busted out the DMM.

 

LED Low Beam = 1.77A @ 11.5 Volts = 20 Watts

Halogen Low Beam = 2.5A @ 11.5 Volts = 28 Watts (or round up to 29W)

LED High Beam = 3.9A @ 11.2 Volts = 43 Watts (or round up if you care)

Halogen High Beam = 3.77A @ 11.2 Volts = 42 Watts

 

Now, if I did these same tests with the engine running, and getting full alternator voltage, and let's just assume we're running HOT at 14volts, that puts max halogen wattage around 50 watts on high beams and around 35 watts on low beams. In my experience, halogens tend to be pretty linear in a certain range, and amps will go up with volts and lumens increase as well, to a certain point. In the automotive range of 9-14V, that tends to be the case. So if the amps eek up a touch, these halogens might max out around 37/55 watts. By contrast LEDs tend to provide most of their lumens well under max voltage, maybe somewhere halfway between forward voltage and max voltage. Seeing as these fire up just fine on a 9V (common PP3 alkaline) I'm betting I won't notice any difference between my just measured readings versus engine running. But... they WILL waste more energy in the form of heat. I wouldn't anticipate amperage going up much at all, but with the raise in voltage this does put high beam mode at 55watts and low beam at 25 watts. They'll most likely consume just as much, if not more energy in high beam mode, and I honestly didn't think high beam was THAT much brighter, but we'll see once I get these on the road. But what's amazing, is how much lower consumption the low beam mode is with SO MUCH MORE LIGHT. Words don't even begin to describe the difference. I'll try to get a picture before I convert the other side.

 

It is refreshing to actually see the numbers though. I can see why these are rated at 60 Watts, and likely DO consume that at peak voltage. I'd be nice if the manufacture or reseller also shared specs on the low beam setting though. I'm also not so sad my headlight wiring is over-gauged, and these still pull plenty of power to warrant being careful.

 

Also, I didn't get power draw on the halo, yet. I plan to, but I also anticipate it being super low, around the .5A or less range.

Edited by Gollum

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