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M_Dragan

Picking out a clutch

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Hi guys, I'm at the stage where I'm trying to pick out a clutch for my SBC 350 Z. Although the problems that I don't know how much power I'm making. How can I pick out a clutch that won't fail and not go way overboard on a high horsepower clutch? My current build is .030 over pistons, ported and polished heads, edelbrock performer intake, edelbrock 600 cfm carb, edelbrock performer cam, full headers, and 11 degrees timing. 

 

 

Thanks!

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Two projects: 1972 240Z SBC V8 with Camaro WC T5 transmission. Mild cam. 290 -300 HP range. Both cars daily drivers.

  1. My first 240Z V8 project (2001) I used a stock Carquest clutch kit. Pedal was smooth and light. No problem.
  2. For my second 240Z SBC  V8  PROJECT (2009) I used a Zoom Kevlar clutch kit from Summit. P/N HP-1675-1A. Haven't  had a problem.

Flywheel resurfacing and Balancing: 

  1. Used flywheels should be resurfaced and balanced.
  2. New flywheels should also have the balance checked . The balance on my  new flywheel for the second build was off.

Driveshaft:

Select a quality driveshaft shop to cut and balance the drive shaft. One driveshaft shop I went to cut and welded the driveshaft off center causing vibration above 60 MPH. I pulled the driveshaft and took it  to a  quality driveshaft shop for rework. All is well.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Miles said:

Two projects: 1972 240Z SBC V8 with Camaro WC T5 transmission. Mild cam. 290 -300 HP range. Both cars daily drivers.

  1. My first 240Z V8 project (2001) I used a stock Carquest clutch kit. Pedal was smooth and light. No problem.
  2. For my second 240Z SBC  V8  PROJECT (2009) I used a Zoom Kevlar clutch kit from Summit. P/N HP-1675-1A. Haven't  had a problem.

Flywheel resurfacing and Balancing: 

  1. Used flywheels should be resurfaced and balanced.
  2. New flywheels should also have the balance checked . The balance on my  new flywheel for the second build was off.

Driveshaft:

Select a quality driveshaft shop to cut and balance the drive shaft. One driveshaft shop I went to cut and welded the driveshaft off center causing vibration above 60 MPH. I pulled the driveshaft and took it  to a  quality driveshaft shop for rework. All is well.

 

 

Thank you!

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4 hours ago, grillhands said:

I would get a clutch that is well above what you think you'll put down to the wheels. You don't want to do the job twice.  Did you upgrade your clutch master cylinder?

Yeah thats what I was thinking. As for the master cylinder, it actually doesn't have one. I'm also converting the car from auto to manual, getting tired of the th350. Any master cylinder suggestions for use with a 400 - 500 hp clutch with t5 trans?

Edited by M_Dragan

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Wilwood or Tilton 7/8 clutch MC  works with the stock Camaro T5 slave cylinder.  I have used both.

I prefer the Wilwood MC as it is more compact.

The Camaro slave cylinder uses a roll pin connection to the hydraulic line. Summit/Jegs etc sell a roll pin to AN adapter so you can connect stainless braided -3 AN hose to the clutch MC.

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9 hours ago, Miles said:

Wilwood or Tilton 7/8 clutch MC  works with the stock Camaro T5 slave cylinder.  I have used both.

I prefer the Wilwood MC as it is more compact.

The Camaro slave cylinder uses a roll pin connection to the hydraulic line. Summit/Jegs etc sell a roll pin to AN adapter so you can connect stainless braided -3 AN hose to the clutch MC.

Okay cool, looks like ill be getting the Wildwood MC. Thanks for all the help!

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I used a Centerforce dual friction clutch on my build. Centerforce claims these are good for 600ft lbs at the crank. It was quite the PITA to get proper disengagement from though.

I used a WC T5 out of an 89 camaro with the stock bellhousing. The slave cylinder has 1 inch bore so I used a 1 inch bore master. A 1 1/8 master may have worked better though with the Centerforce DF clutch. Wilwood makes a nice compact sized master. 

We also had to lengthen the master cylinder rod to the clutch pedal and lengthen the slave cylinder rod. 

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I have the roll pin. I ordered 2 by accident if you need it. My one concern is the 400-500hp on a t5. Maybe a WCt5 or a t56 can handle that but also think about the rear end. From what I read the r180 is good for stock v8 but for more powerful builds you might want to get the r200. Also, if I remember correctly, i used the slave off a 4.3 s10 because it come with a bleeder valve and the camaro did not. It's the same size and everything. I've been using it on my t56 for 4 months with no problems.

Edited by grillhands

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8 hours ago, grillhands said:

I have the roll pin. I ordered 2 by accident if you need it. My one concern is the 400-500hp on a t5. Maybe a WCt5 or a t56 can handle that but also think about the rear end. From what I read the r180 is good for stock v8 but for more powerful builds you might want to get the r200. Also, if I remember correctly, i used the slave off a 4.3 s10 because it come with a bleeder valve and the camaro did not. It's the same size and everything. I've been using it on my t56 for 4 months with no problems.

I've been told that the t5WC will handle 400hp fine as long as I don't drag race the car with slicks (which I won't be doing). They said that as long as the tires can break free and spin under load that it shouldn't be a problem. I also won't be going above 400hp, I just want the clutch to be a little above the max hp of the motor. As far ass the rear end goes, I will be replacing it with an r200. Thoughts?

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There are other weak points to consider in your build plan.

The stub axles typically fail in two places, the tire mounting flange breaks off or the axle breaks where the threads meet the splines on the axle.  See pictures.

The flanges are easily warped which can cause problems with disk conversions. I had this problem when I did the Modern Motor Sports 240SX rear disk conversion. My rear brakes were dragging due to the warped flanges wobbling against the pads. Tried machining the flanges, but they were were too far out.

When my Z was stock the driver's side stub axle broke while pulling away from a stop sign. Very loud pop when it let go.

The solution to the above problems was the stainless steel stub axles now available from Modern Motor Sports. No more problems.

http://www.modern-motorsports.com/stub-axles.html

 

BROKEN STUB AXLE FLANGE.jpg

BROKEN STUB AXLE.jpg

Edited by Miles

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Not to be the acerbic dissenter here, but sometimes it is more satisfying (not to mention, more illuminating) to get components that are of marginal robustness, but which are standard, common and well-researched... try them out, see if they happen to work, and then replace if/when failure happens.  Too often, we overbuild; we overspend, end up for example with a clutch that's too heavy to be comfortable, with a "bulletproof" transmission with heavy/cumbersome gear-engagement, and so forth.  I personally made this mistake, in going with a Doug Nash 4+1 transmission... "bulletproof" indeed, but a chore to shift, with gears that are too closely spaced.  At least the clutch was a success... Centerforce dual-friction; Hayes 168-tooth aluminum flywheel - both from the Summit catalog.  The one semi-unorthodox piece was the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing, obviating a clutch-fork or pivot point.

 

In sum, consider the typical small-block build from the Summit or Jegs catalog.  It should work fine.

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19 minutes ago, Michael said:

Not to be the acerbic dissenter here, but sometimes it is more satisfying (not to mention, more illuminating) to get components that are of marginal robustness, but which are standard, common and well-researched... try them out, see if they happen to work, and then replace if/when failure happens.  Too often, we overbuild; we overspend, end up for example with a clutch that's too heavy to be comfortable, with a "bulletproof" transmission with heavy/cumbersome gear-engagement, and so forth.  I personally made this mistake, in going with a Doug Nash 4+1 transmission... "bulletproof" indeed, but a chore to shift, with gears that are too closely spaced.  At least the clutch was a success... Centerforce dual-friction; Hayes 168-tooth aluminum flywheel - both from the Summit catalog.  The one semi-unorthodox piece was the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing, obviating a clutch-fork or pivot point.

 

In sum, consider the typical small-block build from the Summit or Jegs catalog.  It should work fine.

 

Well said.  An over built car is expensive and can be miserable to drive.

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