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Info on California Engine Swaps (BAR):


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My cars swap was done in the 1980's . The law was different then.

I'm not too worried either, but just as gun laws changed rather quickly, you never know what may happen to smog laws. Laws that only effect a small number of folks ( like guns, hot rods ) are easy to switch out on you.

So I'm protected a bit more with my grandfathered BAR sticker, I guess.

-Les

 

 

 

This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

 

I find all this smog requirement talk quite entertaining. Per the California laws posted an engine swap must use the same year or newer engine to be legal. Then how did a 1964 327 get a B.A.R sticker for a 1973 Z?

 

Maybe per the law an engine swap into a '75 or older vehicle must pass certain requirements but in the real word most pre '76 swaps are made with no regard to the law. Personally I'm not worried about the legality of the 302 Ford swap into my 240Z and neither are the thousands of other people who have made an engine swap into a pre '76 vehicle.

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I had a long conversation with a Technical Advisor at the California Bureau of Automotive Repair (BAR) regarding some of the finer points of engine swaps. This is what I came up with:   V

2 month or so old thread but I dont think I have to worry about smog because my dad's friend is a manager or so for a smog place and he passed like 6 of our cars and like 10 of our friend's. To repair what was wrong would have costed us a couple hundred dollars but he says " come back on sunday and I'll pass your car for 110$ ."

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This thread got me wondering.... My '73 has a B.A.R. sticker in the door jamb that states that it is registered with the 1964 chevy 327 c.i. engine.

 

I find all this smog requirement talk quite entertaining. Per the California laws posted an engine swap must use the same year or newer engine to be legal. Then how did a 1964 327 get a B.A.R sticker for a 1973 Z?

 

 

"If the engine swap was conducted before May 1984' date=' pre and post dating of engines was allowable"

 

I know this as I tried to get a 71 L24 Induction/Exhaust system certified on my 73 when I moved here. When it was all said and done, it was clear Smog Laws were about perpetuating a bureaucracy and had very little to do with either common sense, nor clean air. My enraged last words to the referee after jumping through every hoop they put up, was 'Screw you, next time you see this car, it's going to have an LS3 454 Big Block in it from a 73 Corvette!' his reply was "Good, we can smog THAT!"

 

Grrrrrrr! Needless to say that was the last time I legally smogged the 73...

 

But to add something to this discussion, remember that there STILL exists a rolling exemption!

 

Yes indeed girls and boys, vehicles manufactured 35 years ago [i']and insured under collector car insurance[/i] no longer have a VISUAL INSPECTION FAIL CRITERION!

 

What that is to say is that my 1973 (if you do DMV Math) with the originally installed 71 SU system on it would only be required to pass a TAILPIPE smog check. VISUAL CRITERION IS DISMISSED because I have Haggerty Insurance on it. The pre-75 cars are a grey area, but the DMV was forced to this through lobbying on SEMA's part during the last round of SMOG madness.

 

When the 76's come due, though not technically approved, a standaone EFI that retained the Catalyst would pass the SMOG test required of it with an aftermarket FPR and Fuel Rail... As long as it passes clean out the pipe, which should not be a problem.

 

It's a little known quirk in the laws. If you have your car insured by Haggerty, or one of the other collector-car companies, remember this fact. They can't fail on visual criterion, the cars with colector car insurance are EXEMPT from a VISUAL FAILURE CRITERION.

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It's a little known quirk in the laws. If you have your car insured by Haggerty, or one of the other collector-car companies, remember this fact. They can't fail on visual criterion, the cars with collector car insurance are EXEMPT from a VISUAL FAILURE CRITERION.

 

Tony, that's excellent news :D I'm very happy to hear this, but where did you find out about it? Any links? This is to confirm it elsewhere.

 

Davy

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other than to and from repair shops,

a collector car can only be driven to parades and club/car related functions.

 

in other words, not to work, not to grocery store. not to your friend's house. not even around the block because you felt like taking it out of the garage.

 

i went through this when i owned the 70 LT- 1 vette. dropped the coverage because i wanted to drive my car on daily basis.

 

i am sure the state won't get too excited but, haggarty will if finds out : fender bender in the target parking lot.

 

 

below is the statement about visual inspection.

 

was basically put in place so that museums could keep cars registered and not have to bother with chasing down functioning parts made of unobtainium to stay smog legal.

 

The bill would also provide that, commencing April 1, 2005,

defined collector motor vehicles for which proof of insurance is

submitted on that basis in accordance with regulations of the Bureau

of Automotive Repair, and that are at least 35 model-years old, shall

be subject to otherwise applicable exhaust emissions standards, but

shall not be required to pass a visual and functional inspection of

emission equipment, other than a functional inspection of the fuel

cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel leaks.

 

 

whole law is below

 

BILL NUMBER: AB 2683 ENROLLED

BILL TEXT

 

PASSED THE SENATE AUGUST 27, 2004

PASSED THE ASSEMBLY AUGUST 27, 2004

AMENDED IN SENATE AUGUST 26, 2004

AMENDED IN SENATE AUGUST 23, 2004

AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MAY 20, 2004

AMENDED IN ASSEMBLY MARCH 24, 2004

 

INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Lieber

(Coauthor: Assembly Member Koretz)

(Coauthor: Senator Machado)

 

FEBRUARY 20, 2004

 

An act to amend Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code, and

to amend Sections 4000.1 and 4000.2 of the Vehicle Code, relating to

air pollution.

 

 

 

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

 

 

AB 2683, Lieber. Air pollution: smog check.

(1) Existing law establishes a motor vehicle inspection and

maintenance program (smog check), administered by the Department of

Consumer Affairs and the State Air Resources Board, that provides for

the inspection of all motor vehicles, except those specifically

exempted from the program, upon registration, biennially upon renewal

of registration, upon transfer of ownership, and in certain other

circumstances. Existing law requires the Department of Motor

Vehicles to require any motor vehicle subject to those requirements

to demonstrate compliance with those requirements. Existing law also

establishes an enhanced motor vehicle inspection and maintenance

program (smog check II) in each urbanized area of the state, any part

of which is classified by the United States Environmental Protection

Agency as a serious, severe, or extreme nonattainment area for

specified air contaminants. Existing law also requires the smog

tests to include, at minimum, loaded mode dynamometer testing in

enhanced areas, and 2-speed testing in all other program areas, and a

visual or functional check of emission control devices specified by

the department. Existing law exempted from those requirements, until

January 1, 2003, any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1974

model-year, and after that date, any motor vehicle that is 30 or more

model-years old.

This bill would instead, commencing April 1, 2005, exempt from the

smog check requirements, and the smog check compliance requirements,

any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1976 model-year.

Existing law exempts from existing smog check requirements, any

motor vehicle 4 or less model-years old and also exempts any motor

vehicle up to 6 model-years old, unless the state board determines

that the exemption would prohibit the state from meeting specified

requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

This bill would, commencing April 1, 2005, make the exemption for

any motor vehicle 4 or less model-years old inapplicable if the state

board makes those same determinations regarding the requirements of

the federal act.

 

 

The bill would also provide that, commencing April 1, 2005,

defined collector motor vehicles for which proof of insurance is

submitted on that basis in accordance with regulations of the Bureau

of Automotive Repair, and that are at least 35 model-years old, shall

be subject to otherwise applicable exhaust emissions standards, but

shall not be required to pass a visual and functional inspection of

emission equipment, other than a functional inspection of the fuel

cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel leaks.

 

 

 

(2) Under existing law, the Department of Motor Vehicles, with

certain exceptions, is required to obtain submission of a valid smog

check certificate of compliance or noncompliance, as appropriate, in

order to register a motor vehicle previously registered outside the

state. Among other exemptions, from this requirement, existing law

exempts 1965 or earlier model-year motor vehicles.

This bill, commencing April 1, 2005, would instead apply the

model-year exemption that is applicable to vehicles registered in

this state. The bill would also make technical clarifying changes.

(3) Existing law makes any violation of the smog check

requirements a misdemeanor.

To the extent that the bill would impose the smog check

requirements on additional vehicles on and after April 1, 2005, this

bill would impose a state-mandated local program by expanding the

scope of a crime.

(4) This bill would render inoperative on and after April 1, 2005,

the amendments to Sections 43843 and 44004 of the Health and Safety

Code proposed by SB 1615, if this bill is enacted after SB 1615.

(5) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse

local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the

state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that

reimbursement.

This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this

act for a specified reason.

 

 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

 

 

SECTION 1. (a) It is the intent of the Legislature, in enacting

the act adding this section, to ensure that vehicles, of the 1975

model-year and older are permanently exempted from the biennial

compliance requirement of the motor vehicle inspection and

maintenance (smog check) program.

(B) It is further the intent of the Legislature to ensure that the

Department of Motor Vehicles and the Department of Consumer Affairs

have adequate time to comply with the requirements of the act adding

this section by delaying the operation of the act until April 1,

2005.

SEC. 2. Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to

read:

44011. (a) All motor vehicles powered by internal combustion

engines that are registered within an area designated for program

coverage shall be required biennially to obtain a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance, except for all of the following:

(1) Every motorcycle, and every diesel-powered vehicle, until the

department, pursuant to Section 44012, implements test procedures

applicable to motorcycles or to diesel-powered vehicles, or both.

(2) Any motor vehicle that has been issued a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance or a repair cost waiver upon a change of

ownership or initial registration in this state during the preceding

six months.

(3) Any motor vehicle manufactured prior to the 1976 model-year.

(4) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), any motor vehicle

four or less model-years old.

(B) Beginning January 1, 2005, any motor vehicle six or less

model-years old, unless the state board finds that providing an

exception for these vehicles will prohibit the state from meeting the

requirements of Section 176© of the federal Clean Air Act (42

U.S.C. Sec. 7401 et seq.) or the state's commitments with respect to

the state implementation plan required by the federal Clean Air Act.

 

© Any motor vehicle excepted by this paragraph shall be subject

to testing and to certification requirements as determined by the

department, if any of the following apply:

(i) The department determines through remote sensing activities or

other means that there is a substantial probability that the vehicle

has a tampered emission control system or would fail for other cause

a smog check test as specified in Section 44012.

(ii) The vehicle was previously registered outside this state and

is undergoing initial registration in this state.

(iii) The vehicle is being registered as a specially constructed

vehicle.

(iv) The vehicle has been selected for testing pursuant to Section

44014.7 or any other provision of this chapter authorizing

out-of-cycle testing.

(5) In addition to the vehicles exempted pursuant to paragraph

(4), any motor vehicle or class of motor vehicles exempted pursuant

to subdivision (B) of Section 44024.5. It is the intent of the

Legislature that the department, pursuant to the authority granted by

this paragraph, exempt at least 15 percent of the lowest emitting

motor vehicles from the biennial smog check inspection.

(6) Any motor vehicle that the department determines would present

prohibitive inspection or repair problems.

(7) Any vehicle registered to the owner of a fleet licensed

pursuant to Section 44020 if the vehicle is garaged exclusively

outside the area included in program coverage, and is not primarily

operated inside the area included in program coverage.

(B) Vehicles designated for program coverage in enhanced areas

shall be required to obtain inspections from appropriate smog check

stations operating in enhanced areas.

© For purposes of subdivision (a), any collector motor vehicle,

as defined in Section 259 of the Vehicle Code, is exempt from those

portions of the test required by subdivision (f) of Section 44012 if

the collector motor vehicle meets all of the following criteria:

(1) Submission of proof that the motor vehicle is insured as a

collector motor vehicle, as shall be required by regulation of the

bureau.

(2) The motor vehicle is at least 35 model-years old.

(3) The motor vehicle complies with the exhaust emissions

standards for that motor vehicle's class and model-year as prescribed

by the department, and the motor vehicle passes a functional

inspection of the fuel cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel

leaks.

SEC. 3. Section 4000.1 of the Vehicle Code is amended to read:

4000.1. (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (B), ©,

or (d) of this section, or subdivision (B) of Section 43654 of the

Health and Safety Code, the department shall require upon initial

registration, and upon transfer of ownership and registration, of any

motor vehicle subject to Part 5 (commencing with Section 43000) of

Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, a valid certificate of

compliance or a certificate of noncompliance, as appropriate, issued

in accordance with Section 44015 of the Health and Safety Code.

(B) With respect to new motor vehicles certified pursuant to

Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 43100) of Part 5 of Division 26 of

the Health and Safety Code, the department shall accept a statement

completed pursuant to subdivision (B) of Section 24007 in lieu of the

certificate of compliance.

© For purposes of determining the validity of a certificate of

compliance or noncompliance submitted in compliance with the

requirements of this section, the definitions of new and used motor

vehicle contained in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 39010) of

Part 1 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code shall control.

(d) Subdivision (a) does not apply to a transfer of ownership and

registration under any of the following circumstances:

(1) The initial application for transfer is submitted within the

90-day validity period of a smog certificate as specified in Section

44015 of the Health and Safety Code.

(2) The transferor is the parent, grandparent, sibling, child,

grandchild, or spouse of the transferee.

(3) A motor vehicle registered to a sole proprietorship is

transferred to the proprietor as owner.

(4) The transfer is between companies whose principal business is

leasing motor vehicles, if there is no change in the lessee or

operator of the motor vehicle or between the lessor and the person

who has been, for at least one year, the lessee's operator of the

motor vehicle.

(5) The transfer is between the lessor and lessee of the motor

vehicle, if there is no change in the lessee or operator of the motor

vehicle.

(6) The motor vehicle was manufactured prior to the 1976

model-year.

(7) Beginning January 1, 2005, the transfer is for a motor vehicle

that is four or less model-years old. The department shall impose a

fee of eight dollars ($8) on the transferee of a motor vehicle that

is four or less model-years old. Revenues generated from the

imposition of that fee shall be deposited into the Vehicle Inspection

and Repair Fund.

(e) The State Air Resources Board, under Part 5 (commencing with

Section 43000) of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code, may

exempt designated classifications of motor vehicles from subdivision

(a) as it deems necessary, and shall notify the department of that

action.

(f) Subdivision (a) does not apply to a motor vehicle when an

additional individual is added as a registered owner of the motor

vehicle.

(g) For purposes of subdivision (a), any collector motor vehicle,

as defined in Section 259, is exempt from those portions of the test

required by subdivision (f) of Section 44012 of the Health and Safety

Code, if the collector motor vehicle meets all of the following

criteria:

(1) Submission of proof that the motor vehicle is insured as a

collector motor vehicle, as shall be required by regulation of the

bureau.

(2) The motor vehicle is at least 35 model-years old.

(3) The motor vehicle complies with the exhaust emissions

standards for that motor vehicle's class and model year as prescribed

by the department, and the motor vehicle passes a functional

inspection of the fuel cap and a visual inspection for liquid fuel

leaks.

SEC. 4. Section 4000.2 of the Vehicle Code is amended to read:

4000.2. (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (B) of

Section 43654 of the Health and Safety Code, and, commencing on April

1, 2005, except for model-years exempted from biennial inspection

pursuant to Section 44011 of the Health and Safety Code, the

department shall require upon registration of a motor vehicle subject

to Part 5 (commencing with Section 43000) of Division 26 of the

Health and Safety Code, previously registered outside this state, a

valid certificate of compliance or a certificate of noncompliance, as

appropriate, issued in accordance with Section 44015 of the Health

and Safety Code.

(B) For the purposes of determining the validity of a certificate

of compliance or noncompliance submitted in compliance with the

requirements of this section, the definitions of new and used motor

vehicle contained in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 39010) of

Part 1 of Division 26 of the Health and Safety Code shall control.

SEC. 5. The amendments to Sections 43843 and 44004 of the Health

and Safety Code proposed by Senate Bill 1615, if enacted, shall not

be operative.

SEC. 6. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to

Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because

the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school

district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or

infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty

for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the

Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the

meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California

Constitution.

SEC. 7. This act shall become operative on April 1, 2005.

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oh almost forgot.

 

most collector car insurance companies will not insure modified collector cars.

 

when bought the 70 LT-1 had hooker headers and big chrome side pipes ( i removed em. were ugly loud and damn hot ).

 

haggerty would not insure it with the side pipes. also wanted to know on application form, if had modifications IE: high performance camshaft, non stock carb, engine swap, suspension modifications, brakes, ect.

 

they do have a class for modified vehicles.

rules at the time, and as they have gotten stricter i am sure rules are the same ; modified vehicles must be trailered to events. may only be driven at sanctioned events or on private property and never on any public roadways. burger pit parking ( ect ) lots are considered public accessible roadways, therefore modified vehicle may not be operated/driven in parking lots.

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  • 4 weeks later...

the crate engine usually has a spec as to the years the engine is applicable.

 

company selling crate engine shows range of years the engine may replace.

 

generally, this is what the state will use as the year of the engine.

 

if engine is not new. instead is a rebuilt, check the casting date on the block.

 

the casting date will be used by the state to determine the date of manufactuer and smog requirements.

 

 

 

if there is no spec application implied as when using a racing engine, you may find that CARB will disallow the use of the engine ( racing application, not designed to be used on the highway ).

 

most replacement engines come with a CARB ( california air resources bureau ) certification.

 

you should be safe if using any of the certified engines.

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Just to add a little something...

 

Intercooler replacements on vehicles that were originally equipped with some sort of intercooler is CARB exempt and do not require approval or additional testing. This covers a small side mount to a huge front mount.

 

Also, the current laws state (if I am not mistaken) that you can not replace your current engine with one with additional cylinders. For example, if you have a I-6, you can not drop in a V8. The engine also has to come from the same brand of vehicle (Nissan to a Nissan, no Toyota in a Nissan).

 

I have swapped and BAR'd a few Honda vehicles and all have had first time passes except for one that had an A/F ratio gauge. The A/F gauge is illegal because it taps/alters an essential ECM signal.

 

SR20DET swap in a 240SX will never be legal. However, you may be able to get a SR20DE in a 240SX. A loop hole may be possible since the G20 and Sentra had SR20 options, but the US has never had a turbo version of this engine.

 

Unfortunately, I have a 1977 Z so I need to comply and get tested. BUT I have always been curious about the RB being a legal swap because the Skyline was imported by Motorex for a period of time. This means that the RB engine series WAS available in the USA legally...

 

Of course, all my comments are only intended to apply to CA laws.

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Guest imperial562@yahoo.com

 

Referee inspection:

Pre-75 vehicles (vehicles not requiring smog tests) do not have to be referee certified. However, CHP (or any law enforcement officer, I suppose) can write you an emissions citation, which would need a visit to the referee to sign off to cancel the citation (fixit ticket). Apparently, the State is actively looking at modified vehicles for emissions violations (roadside checkpoints as mentioned previously)

 

 

As of 2008?if yes.. then could I say that 2009 law will be Pre-76 vehicles that dont need smog?

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I don't know 'bout 'club events or to a repair shop' but about the only time I'm driving the hot car is during a club function. And my preferred repair shop to fix that streaky wiper is just around the corner from where I work. Wouldn't make sense to drive back from work home, pick up the Z, then drive back to work (arriving around 8pm) to get it fixed... There would be no legal basis to support any citation for a car being driven anywhere that wasn't 'club or repair shop' linked. That is as simple as anybody making a simple declaration on the spot.

What exists is the insurance company limitations on coverage for collector vehicles. "Pleasure usage" is a key term in many policies, and if they are granting 'collector car insurance' to 'pleasure use vehicles' then it complies with the letter of the law, and you are covered by functional criteria only-no visual. There are no mileage limits other than what your insurance company imposes, so shop wisely!

They have moved compliance checks for collector status to the insurance companies, and basically they don't want commuter vehicles being exempted from the full-on smog testing. Ever notice the 'historic vehicle' plates used to have a form to fill out, now it's not in the DMV catalog? Now you have to make a statement of fact and go through all sorts of hurdles to get one of THOSE issued. Why? Because they don't want to issue them as once you get one that's it for anything they have as restrictions over your car. It's the only exempt plate a private person can get. Yes, exempt. Same classification as municipal vehicles and police cars, exempt exempt. No more of the testing which I refer to as anachronistic and bureaucratic at all for an Historic Vehicle Plated Z. But I'll keep it under the lid for now only because I'm supposed to... There's just no practical way for them to enforce that phraseology to deny collector car status---It specifically states you have to have collector insurance, and that is how they identify the cars. The DMV finally moved up to the 21st century with such technologically adept states as Alabama and had all insurance carriers in the state submit insurance information via computer! So they know what coverage you have, and smog you accordingly. Unless you are driving well beyond 2500 miles per year locally with your car (in which case you shouldn't have collector car insurance anyway, it's a regularly driven vehicle!) it's likely not an issue, and that is the threshold in many Insurance companies policies with the same verbiage of club events, parades, repair work, etc etc etc. Though the 'pleasure use' is still the most liberal and IMO the best policy to get. Most of the insurance companies will let you bump any mileage restrictions on your policy for infrequent out-of-state events. I told them I was going to drive cross-country to attend a Z-Car Convention in Canada, and I expected to go around 18K miles that year. Ended up going 18K miles in the trip, and all the agent said was 'which way did you go?' trying to figure out how I put 18K on in three weeks when in a straight line it's maybe 3200 miles. Hey, "Enjoy the Ride"!

 

The letter of the law says that ANY engine replacement or swap be reported to the DMV for recording of the appropriate information as well. If you don't do it, it's an illegal engine swap/replacement and subjects your car to impound. They only press it in the cases of street racers, but all those L24 serial numbered 240Z's with L28's in 'em without a valid engine replacement record on file are crusherbait as well. It's all in the V-Codes.

 

I blame the Tool Shed for directing me to revisit the post, and thereby bump it again.

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  • 3 months later...
Just to add a little something...

 

Also, the current laws state (if I am not mistaken) that you can not replace your current engine with one with additional cylinders. For example, if you have a I-6, you can not drop in a V8. The engine also has to come from the same brand of vehicle (Nissan to a Nissan, no Toyota in a Nissan).

 

quote]

 

^^^ i have heard of this aswell. is it true?

 

so ls1 or 2jz cannot be legalize even if all smog equipment is installed?

 

on a 74 160z?

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  • 5 years later...
Just to add a little something...

 

Also, the current laws state (if I am not mistaken) that you can not replace your current engine with one with additional cylinders. For example, if you have a I-6, you can not drop in a V8. The engine also has to come from the same brand of vehicle (Nissan to a Nissan, no Toyota in a Nissan).

 

quote]

 

^^^ i have heard of this aswell. is it true?

 

so ls1 or 2jz cannot be legalize even if all smog equipment is installed?

 

on a 74 160z?

 

Bringing this back from the dead, I know. But I was going through old posts on the topic and found this alarming falsehood that amazingly had no retort.

 

This is utter B.S. There is no law in CA that I've seen (and I've ready nearly all of the smog related ones I believe) that says anything of the sort. What the law DOES state, is that in order to swap an engine in a BAR approved manner, the engine DOES need to come from the same vehicle weight class (no heavy pickup engines in a triumph, but regular 1/4 or 1/2 ton pickups would be fine in most cases depending on GVW), cannot be from a model year older vehicle, and the engine cannot be of lesser equivalent smog equipment. The latter bit is what the state ref will use to tell you that you can't install a carbureted engine in a vehicle that was E.F.I. from the factory. A move obvious violation would be installing an engine with no factory evap system when your stock engine DID have evap. Obvious no-no.

 

Further proof of this falsehood, is the fact that last time I was talking with a ref while he tested my own car (about a year ago now), he was trying to get ME to SWAP a LS1 into my 280ZX!!!! Yes, that's right. The ref WANTED me to swap my engine and bring it back to be legalized... Why? Because he'd just legalized one earlier in the month and thought it was really cool.

 

No back to your regularly scheduled slumber...

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