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G.I.jonas

Subaru EG33 + My car!

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Notice that the front axles are in the supposed "bell housing". The section that that piece bolts on to is the steel girdle for the trans with fittings to route a trans cooler to it. You will have to find a way to either eliminate the front differential or shift the motor very far forward. Likewise, you can see the plastic and rubber dogbone sticking off of the front of the trans. It swivels on it's mount point on the trans.

The photo in post #66 shows the bottom view of the engine with the plastic timing covers added (and pointed down). Post #71 with the STi trans shows how much further back from that that the axles for the front wheels are.

All Subaru engines have very similar dimensions, but the exhaust manifold is different. A factory turbo exhaust manifold will shoot straight down from both exhaust ports, but will also take room to the right of the passenger exhaust flange and also room behind the passenger head for the turbo; which usually sits behind the passenger head.

 

Hope that helps.

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Those transmissions posted above are stick-shift manuals right (not some stupid paddle shift ones that are popular today)? If so how far back is the shifter mounted on them? Would the shifter to engine block measurement be similar? If it is I could just look for one of those, I just don't want the shifter coming up at my elbow because of the engine set-back.

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Those transmissions posted above are stick-shift manuals right (not some stupid paddle shift ones that are popular today)? If so how far back is the shifter mounted on them? Would the shifter to engine block measurement be similar? If it is I could just look for one of those, I just don't want the shifter coming up at my elbow because of the engine set-back.

Look at the STI transmission. You can see where the shifter hooks on to just to the left and a bit forward of the output shaft.

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So it mounts on the outside like the old skool and racing 4speeds do? Do they run by mechanical gears or hydraulic/electric servos like automatics do? Basically if I remove the front differential can I get rid of most or all of that wiring that's on it? It looks like there's a lot of stuff there, I like the simple transmissions where the only wire going to it is the reverse lights wire and of course the speedometer cable. I guess I should just see if I can find an Impreza repair manual huh? Off to Amazon.com I go.

 

Well I just got back from Amazon. I couldn't find an Impreza repair manual but there's a Legacy one so next time I'm able to stop by an AutoZone or something I'll see if they have the book. I was thinking the EJ25 would be better since it's higher displacement. But I doubt the Legacy had a transmission on par with the WRX or STI version so the manual would be pointless for that huh? Good thing I have so much free time to think about what to do.

 

Sorry about all my questions, the gearbox is the only thing I have yet to have figured out enough yet. If it would be easier for you all I'm just gonna spend my time finding as many articles as I can and read those first. I'll get back to you all later. Thank you for all the help though.

 

Found this on a different forum:

"i'm told that gen3 rx-7 transmissions will install w/ minimal drilling, and will mate properly to the svx engine, and since the svx engine will mount to the other subaru transmissions it's reasonable to assume because a=b b=c then a=c, that you could shoehorn in a manual rx7 transmission and have rwd"

 

But I don't know if it's reliable, no one on the forum seemed to even notice that statement at all.

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You see on the STi pic, the shroud around the opening for the propshaft? It is plated in zinc? Just above it and behind a bit is the linkage for the shifter. It's a squared-off "U" shape and also plated with a gold zinc. That's it.

STi's use just the one linkage and it's mechanical. The forward versus rearward shifter gates are achieved by pushing/pulling that link. To move from the left, to center, to right, to reverse lateral gates, the link is twisted. Kinda like a joystick hooked to the other side of a simple cantilever system. Look up aftermarket short shifter kits. Some of the complete shifters are retrofit and should show the majority of the shifter linkage. The shift knob, when sitting in neutral, should be maybe four to six inches past the end of the tranny, I'd say. Roughly.

I think all four cylinder engine blocks for the last 10~15+ years bolt the same to mounts and trannies. The STi engine block is different on cams and whatnot, of course. The last couple years they have changed quite a few things rapidly, but I think the basic bolt-on stuff is still the same as always. That's one of the nice things about Subaru.

I know that there are swapout center diffs (IIRC) that ppl use to make a Subaru RWD to dyno them. Not sure if it works on the STi 6 speed, however. The 6 speed is a very well engineered and very tough trans.

Don't buy an RX7 tranny.

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BTW, remember that Subaru engines mount to the firewall above the tranny at the 12 o'clock position.

 

 

Here is the shifter next to a shortened one:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2720&d=1088389404

Upper half installed:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2727&d=1088390861

Up close:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2731&d=1088391157

Notice that there is a ring below the shift knob that you pull up to get into reverse gate (to the right of 5 and 6). There is a cable attached to it to pull a lockout gate out of the way.

 

Pulling the shifter away from the linkage:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2733&d=1088392012

 

Diagram showing the "stay" which gives you the leverage to push/pull and twist the trans link:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2741&d=1088392457

 

Diagram showing what the bottom of the shifter pivots around in; a plastic cup:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2739&d=1088392423

 

Diagram showing the whole thing. Top left shows the end of the link on the trans. Bottom left is the 'stay' which bolts to the trans (IIRC) to provide the leverage:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2738&d=1088392398

 

Showing the closeup of the cup that the shifter rides in:

http://www.scoobymods.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2747&d=1088393282

 

Whole thread:

http://www.scoobymods.com/kartboy_sti_short_shifter-t3785.html?amp;

 

Hope that helps. I used to be a Subaru tuner. 650 whp on a stock block '05 STi with old Cam2. Held up for plenty of drag runs until the customer got time to put a built block in. The ring lands had cracked apart from the power, but were still intact and holding compression. :-)

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Guest nzkaosnz

right, first post here - have been lurking since i first started googling eg33 swaps.

 

 

there are three types of transmissions for subarus, used for swaps (there are others - but noone ususally bothers with them)

 

autos - which i openly admit i know jack about

5 spd manual (proper) and

6 speed manuals.

 

the autos are electric, need the TCU (brains), and virtually impossible to run RWD.

 

Manuals - 5 speeds are the most common, and are of the style shown as the 'wrx' one previous.

6 speeds are a new box, and are a new casing, and much stronger - that is the 'Sti' picture from earlier.

 

 

 

Now, limiting to the 5speeds - there are many varying ratio's/final drives etc available, and some slightly stronger gearsets, found in the turbo versions of the car. The only other oddball is the DCCD centre diff - found in some (mainly JDM) sti RA, or type R.

 

So sticking with the standard 5 speed box - making one RWD isnt entirely difficult, and a few ways of doing this. The most common way, is to take the rear housing off the gearbox to access centre diff, then pour lots of weld, (or the latest i heard was molten lead) into the spider gears, and lock solid. Then on the subarus, (4wd) one had to then remove front CV shafts, and one had a RWD subaru, just leaving the stubs protruding and spinning.

 

Doing this a little better, you can split the box halves, and remove the entire front diff assy, as well as the shaft from the centre diff fowards.

Then using some frost plugs the same size as the seals, you then covered off the holes, for a very stock looking RWD box.

 

Finally - for the even more hardcore, you can get a metal sleeve made up, which replaces the centre diff, sending all drive to rear. but thats normally huge $, as one needs to machine a centre internal spline.

 

So thats 5speeds.

 

 

 

6 speeds, this isnt so common, as they are normally 4-5x the price of a 5speed. and with a 4wd, breaking a gearbox isnt overly difficult, and a 6 speed is considered a bullet proof upgrade.

However, RWD it, and the rear tyre traction breaks first, so a 5speed gearbox seems to handle a lot of abuse then. the stock subaru diff is then normally the next to go

 

 

 

I hope that helps, and can clarify stuff for you lot. fitting a RWD 5speed to either a EJ20 or EG33 would make life easy, as then all starter motor etc bolts up nicely, and there are some decent clutches/flywheels available.

Let me know if you need any further info.

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Here is a useful thread from a site i have belonged to for quite a few years now:

 

http://www.subaru-svx.net/forum/showthread.php?t=35610

 

I have both an SVX with the EG33 in it and a 73 240Z which is why I am reading stuff from this site.

I hope this little bit of info can be useful to someone on here. I can provide more info and other links on this subject if needed.

 

Have a nice weekend all.

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I want the engine as low as possible without the oil pan being lower than any part of the chassis and from what I've seen the oil pan is 8" tall. I'm still trying to find out if I can maybe change the oil pump pickup so I could make the pan shorter and wider. I'd like to dry-sump it because then I can get it as low as it could ever go but that's mega $$$$, then again I could keep my eyes open at swap meets and see what I come across.

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When I had a speed shop, my main tech was a subaru master tech. He told me the oil pump on the turbo subarus (not sure about the 'pedestrain' engines) already has fittings on it to convert to dry sump to accomodate the rally teams. Looking at them, this seems to be true.

The pickup is pretty straightforward on an EJ motor. Just get into it; it's easy to understand once you look at it.

Subarus are already light and low, so I would not worry about going completely out of your way for the last little bit of engine CG.

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Yeah...thats one of my faults. I think about everything as though I don't have a budget and then when I start looking up parts I pretty much put myself into a depression looking at the prices. Lately I've been making 2 lists, the first one of the stuff I can and will do, the other a list of what I wish I was rich enough to do.

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One word of advice when playing around with soobies:

 

NEVER underestimate the possibility that a Nissan part might fit.

 

Tony D has told me a couple of times that Fuji Heavy Industries was actually subcontracted by Nissan to do alot of component manufacture, including (possibly) some L6 cylinder heads (!);

I have seen time after time similarities between my old 87 GL-10 and datsuns/Nissans in general; so.... what I am saying is, you never know. Both cars use Hitachi transmissions and final diffs, (the auto gearbox in the 240SX and the pickup are RWD variants of the same 4EAT that Subaru has used in their cars since around 88) both used Hitachi-mock-Bosch EFI through the 80's at least... You neeever know when a Datsun bit might fit.

 

In a way, a Subaru is what happens when a Volkswagen and a Datsun have a postwar reunion and things get a little out of hand... Drinkin all this modern Ethanol fuel, inhibitions are lost, and O2 sensors get preheated.... Steamy.

 

Edit-> Advance apologies, but I really couldn't delete that once I typed it. I never claimed sanity or tact were my strong points. :bonk:

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If you can get a Mercedes cylinder head to bolt up to a L series...

 

Instead of looking for transmissions that fit a particular soobie engine you might need to work the other way around to find a magic combination. I'd start by going to the junkyard and looking for 70's and 80's soobies and tearing them apart. Take lots of measurements of the blocks mounting holes for the bell housing, and take the bell housings off the tranny and measure the tranny side as well. There's a good chance that at some point subaru was sharing transmission patterns. I mean, there's still nissan 350Z buttons on the interior of the 02-05 STI for crying out loud, and maybe still! There's lots of part sharing that still goes on.

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from wikipedia;

 

From 1968 until 1999, FHI was 20% owned by Nissan, who acquired the stake in 1968 during a period of government-ordered merging of Japanese auto industry firms in order to improve competitiveness under the administration of Prime Minister Eisaku Satō. During their ownership, Nissan was primarily interested in its bus manufacturing division and lent automaking expertise to Subaru. Upon Nissan's acquisition by Renault, its 20% stake was sold to General Motors, but GM announced on October 6, 2005 that it will sell 8.4% of the company to Toyota and disposed of its remaining share, 11.6% of the company, on the market. [2]

 

On April 10, 2008, Toyota increased its stake in FHI to 16.7% and announced the end of minicar production at its facility in Gunma Prefecture. Daihatsu, a subsidiary of Toyota, will instead supply the cars to FHI

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Anybody have any ideas on what to do about the steering? The only thing I can think of is using a lot of u-joints, starting off with pretty much right below the steering wheel because it needs to come out of the firewall through a higher point and then go over and around the engine. With the level of modification it takes already, I don't see any reason why the steering rack can't be rotated to make it easier to line up the new steering arm.

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I'm playing around with mating my EG33 to a T10 style transmission with a GM bellhousing. On my setup I'm going to a reserse mount starter, 110 tooth flywheel and Tilton 2 plate clutch. Once those parts arrive I can figure out the crankshaft adapter and bell housing adapter. It is all penciling out well on the initial design intent. Hopefully I will have the crankshaft adapter and bellhousing adapter on order before christmas.

 

J

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I made drawings of how I was thinking of running the frame rails and stuff. I tried to make them as scale as I could with the primitive tools I had at my reach. Comments welcome

You will have to make the frame rails flare out quite a bit. Otherwise you will cover your exhaust ports with the frame rails. Where's the turbo going??? It usually sits behind the engine...

 

Noting some other comments; you can't really reduce the depth of the oil pan because the exhaust manifold sticks down just as far. Remember this is a boxer. Likewise, I am not sure if it would successfully sump the block if you made it much shallower. Most Subaru's are all the same in basic dimensions, so they are all going to have the same basic format.

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Here is the Bellhousing/Flywheel/Starter setup I'm using for my EG33 conversion. Can't say 100% that it will work out, but I have high hopes.

 

It is a Tilton COT Chevy R07 package. The nice thing with this is the 8 bolt flywheel should make the adapter plate doable to the subaru 8 bolt crank pattern. Also, if I'm unsuccessful with my EG33 adaptation, I can use this setup on a LSx engine simple by sourcing a new flywheel.

imagethumb.php?picture=COTPackage

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Check out these 5 pictures. A guy with a buggy shortened his oil pan on a EG33. Interesting idea I thought. I would have liked to add wings to the pan to add the capacity lost by making it shorter.

 

motormountsmounted.jpg

pickup1.jpg

pickup2.jpg

pickup3.jpg

pickup4.jpg

Interesting idea, but I wouldn't put that on something that likes to turn lateral G's...

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A little motivation for those that don't know the potential of the EG33. Here is a built one.

 

Specs:

12:1 Compression JE pistons

0.5mm oversize valves

Port Heads (mostly on exhaust side to balance flow between dog leg and straight ports)

Web Welded Cams. 244 duration @ 0.050" lift. Total Lift 0.460"

Long tube headers.

 

319hp / 274 torque on pump gas :)

 

eg33Dyno.jpg

 

 

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