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Low Vin Number Value


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I never really understood this. Who cares what the VIN is? Does it make any functional difference to the car? If anything, it simply means that the car has had fewer iterations of development and improvement than others. I fail to see how that is more valuable.

 

Dave

 

I have seen #13 and to have the first street production z means ALOT! The owner decided to restore it as is and let me tell you, I get a funny feeling down in my pants. To have a low vin means alot as its the start of something great. A buddy has #34 and I think #42 or something like that and its cool that they are still around. I mean when it comes to sports car's and cars that are no longer on the road like they used to be, a vin matters. If you have the first honda civic, ok big whoop but if you have the first nsx now thats cool. I guess it adds a value depending on the community of the car. And in the z community low vin's are cool and worth something than a 260z or 280z.

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Makaofox,

 

Fair point. I cannot argue about an emotional experience. I was merely pointing out that at a purely functional level, low VINs would seem to be inferior to later ones.

 

I would also say you're generalizing about the community: They're not worth anything to me. Additionally, I don't know that the modifications to zeds that hybridz was founded upon would do much to increase the value of a low VIN chassis?

 

Dave

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This has been discussed before, and I think Tony D mentioned that unless you are going to restore it to exact factory condition then the low vin means very little. Unless you just want to say ,"Hey mine is older than yours." If you get it for cheap, great. Go for it. But if you plan on modifying it or changing things here and there, then don't pay for the vin, just get it because you want to.

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I own #5362. I love the low Vin. I would love to have # 00060. It's not really that the car is inately built better or worse than any of the other 240z's it's just that it's the newest of the new at the time, which now makes it the oldest of the old. Both play to the desirability of the cars. If #00060 is in decent shape, then I'd say buy it, Restore it and enjoy it. But as always on here, hybridz, it'll be YOUR car. Cut it into paperclips if that's what you want to do. We would be sad to see it go, but as an early Vin# it's value is in it's condition more than anything. So if it's rusted to hell and will cost $1000's to restore to anything, then you might as well pass on it and buy something solid to build on. Restoration is where you'd se it's value.

 

It's happy and noteworthy, since so few of the originals are surviving, but really it's just a number, just like your own age. You're a good model for your age, but your dad was too, just because he's older doesn't mean he was better built. he's probably a great guy, and just as he was when he was a kid too. Same thing for the car, it's an earlier model, but there's nothing really that says its any better just because it's older. I'm sure it's a great car to last this long. But is it any better than a late 240z or a 260z or a 280z? No, it's condition. Your dad like the car may be in great buff shape, and so women would still be attracted to him. If he's old out of shape and wrinkled?, well the ladies may not be so attracted. Same deal with the car, condition is everything. Fixed up, just like your dad working out and eating right, could make the car more attractive.

 

But if you're looking for something to modify, and not restore, you might consider something else, since there are a lot of people who would be interrested in just restoring the car to it's original condition. Noteworthy only adds a little value. The low vin# only makes it noteworthy, the condition is mainly what adds (retains)value. I wouldn't pay more than say a couple hundred for that noteworthyness, but if it's in amazing condition, that low vin noteworthyness could add $1000's to the price. #00060 fully restored I'm sure could command top dollar. whereas my #005632 fully restored will never be top tier, maybe one step lower since mines a Series 1, but still a higher # Vin. But that's marketing to collectors.

 

I specifically bought mine for it's build date, it shares my same birthday. November 1970. So I'm plenty happy with it. Do you see my points? Restored Condition is most of the value, the low Vin# only adds noteworthyness, which in top shape will add a lot to the value, but in poor to average condition, the low vin doesn't add much at all to the value of the car.

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Low numbers work for restoration projects or, possibly, as an investment. If you are looking at an "investment" then look for ORIGINAL: all matching numbers... no 280 blocks; no rust, original paint or at least original paint respray. Original wheels and hubcaps , original radio, and nothing bent, drilled, or exchanged. No hot rod parts and no accidents. Look for all correct paperwork: sales sheet, owner's manual, and such. In my opinion, if any of this is absent or, like rust, present, then this is not an investment. Price it as you would any Series II or 280z. If you are willing to pay a premium for trunk vents and a lighter car go for it.

 

If it is clean, pretty rust free, and complete; then, you may have a good candidate for a "restoration" or "resto-mod".

 

In the absence of the first paragraph, I would buy or not buy based almost entirely upon lack of rust and how complete the car appears to be.

 

I bought a "medium low" Series I for small change. It was rusty in all the same places, had a running 280Z with 5 speed, and every do dad sold by Whitneys on the interior. An automatic, blue interior middle '70. It will be worth far less than a modified Series II or 280z simply because the newer cars are.....how do I say this.."better" for most people.

 

On the other hand, if this were anywhere within 100 miles of my home, I'd stick a couple or three bills in my pocket and drive over to take a look.

 

g

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I have number 979 so I have a really early one. I hear they are the lightest of all the Z cars. Heres one I found thats number 87, but I would never pay 13k for a roller...

 

http://www.datsunclassifieds.com/showproduct.php/product/6828/title/1970-240z-serial2300087/cat/1

 

Still would be nice, after you do a full restoration on it. So the value will be higher then most other Z cars, also how much work it needs will tell you if its worth it.

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Its a datsun I'd just be buying to keep it out of the crusher. He wants what I think is about what its worth. I'm waiting for more pictures and a better description of it. Its 3 hours away so I'm not even going to make an offer without more pics. If I get it I will be putting it up for sale on here.

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I'm not an s30 expert, but my understanding is that there were only 500 Series 1 240's built. They seem to attract the higher values because of it.

 

This is taken from datsunzgarage.com

 

"If you want to find a base model to use for your fantasy racer, try to find one of the first 12,000 or so 240Zs made from 1970 to early 1971. These are identified by a "240Z" badge behind the side window and two grills on the rear hatch. These '70-71s were the lightest of all ZCARs, at about 2300 lbs, making them the best for performance buildups. Later models went to a round Z badge behind the side window and removed the hatch grills. Unfortunately the weight went up a few hundred pounds due to chassis strengthening"

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I have seen #13 and to have the first street production z means ALOT!

 

Maybe it does, but 'HLS30-00013' is not the first street production Z...".

 

I have number 979 so I have a really early one. I hear they are the lightest of all the Z cars.

 

This is taken from datsunzgarage.com

 

"....These '70-71s were the lightest of all ZCARs, at about 2300 lbs, making them the best for performance buildups."

 

The lightest of all Z cars were the 'PS30-SB' Fairlady Z432-Rs. Much of the monocoque structure ( including the rear quarters and the roof ) and many of the body panels hung on it were made from a thinner gauge of sheet steel than the other model S30-series bodies. No contest.

 

 

 

 

One thing the OP might like to bear in mind is that even if the body on this early production car is rotten, many of the early production parts attached to it can fetch good money. It may well be worth more as a parts car than a bodily sound and complete later car....

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