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Rywats

Ok, where are all the V Mount sr20 swaps at..

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Dunno, but I have always thought that the SR20 would make for an excellent lightweight build option. I could see a 350 to 400 hp version. Would make for a great swap and easy maintenance with tons of room.

 

Mike

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I had myself 100% convinced that I wanted a SR + V-Mount until a bit more research turned up that I would need to cut big vents in my hood to let airflow exit the IC properly. That style doesn't really suit an old Z (IMO).

 

The brownish s30 was set-up by "Common Snapper" (Japanese tuner similar to Rocky Auto). In some of their pictures you can see the hood is cut up but he's tried to keep it subtle. They also have an extreme, green rotary-engined track Z with a huge v-mount and equally huge hood vent.

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I'm partial to the opinion that V mount setups are a bit over-hyped. They have to be done very well to work better than a conventional stacked setup, which few are. What I'd like to see more people do is just do a stacked setup with a support that's moved as far back as possible. Done right the extra "core support" could act as a wonderful front end rigidity enhancement, making a wimpy strut bar pointless. If you look at those swaps above you can see that if done right you could start the support back at the strut centerline and come forward at a 45 degree angle for about 6 inches on each side and land perfectly just in front of the engine.

 

At least that's the way I'd do it myself if I was dropping 2-3k+ on a well done SR swap.

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I'm partial to the opinion that V mount setups are a bit over-hyped. They have to be done very well to work better than a conventional stacked setup, which few are. What I'd like to see more people do is just do a stacked setup with a support that's moved as far back as possible. Done right the extra "core support" could act as a wonderful front end rigidity enhancement, making a wimpy strut bar pointless. If you look at those swaps above you can see that if done right you could start the support back at the strut centerline and come forward at a 45 degree angle for about 6 inches on each side and land perfectly just in front of the engine.

 

 

 

I don't see that as being anymore structural because it does not tie in two point on the body. The factory core support connects the l+r frame rails.

 

The main benefits of a vmount is that it allows you to use a fairly larger/taller radiator that you would if it sat straight up (hood clearance) and being that it is on a pinched angle it should have almost 100% of air covering the surface area while the car is in motion; especially @ higher speeds. There is no stacked setup that will perform better than this.

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I don't see that as being anymore structural because it does not tie in two point on the body. The factory core support connects the l+r frame rails.

 

The main benefits of a vmount is that it allows you to use a fairly larger/taller radiator that you would if it sat straight up (hood clearance) and being that it is on a pinched angle it should have almost 100% of air covering the surface area while the car is in motion; especially @ higher speeds. There is no stacked setup that will perform better than this.

 

I've seen plenty of slant radiator setups for this very reason, but I've never seen a V mount radiator/intercooler setup that actually uses a larger radiator than could fit vertically. Most people I've talked to who have done V mount setups do it because they think they'll magically have a cooler intercooler since it won't be attatched to that "hot radiator". In truth, either setup (v mount, or stacked) will work much better when done right, versus just thrown together. It's no different than air dams. Go look at the HybridZ windtunnel data. It's amazing the difference between just making sure to install an air dam well, tight and gapless, versus just a little loose and with gaps. It's no different with a radiator & intercooler. The quality and flushness of the mounting is what counts. Duct work is far more important than radiator or intercooler size.

 

And like I said, "done right" a further back core support WOULD tie in better than the stock core support and ADD rigidity. It's just that few people go that far.

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Wouldn't there be a slight benefit of the shorter inter cooler piping also?

 

Also a possible benefit, but again, I've seen guys do V mounts where the inlet and outlet are at the FAR end, making it nearly as far of a trip for the air as a conventional setup. I've also seen guys with V mounts with open atmosphere BOV systems which is hilarious because a well done recirculating setup can have just as much impact of overall response as having nice short piping.

 

And of course, with the idea I proposed, a conventional vertical setup brought as far back as possible, you could run just as short of piping as the best done V mount setups.

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V-mount setups ARE highly overrated. I have yet to see a properly installed/ducted setup where the air flow is directed properly to flow straight through the heat exchangers and then properly exited. Liquid to air heat exchangers are designed to work most efficiently perpendicular to the air flow. When you start angling them to the airflow you create a lot of turbulence on the forward surface of the heat exchanger which significantly reduces flow. To make a V-mount work you need to turn and duct the incoming air to go straight through the heat exchangers and then exit the air straight out and then turn and duct to a low pressure area.

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V-mount setups ARE highly overrated. I have yet to see a properly installed/ducted setup where the air flow is directed properly to flow straight through the heat exchangers and then properly exited. Liquid to air heat exchangers are designed to work most efficiently perpendicular to the air flow. When you start angling them to the airflow you create a lot of turbulence on the forward surface of the heat exchanger which significantly reduces flow. To make a V-mount work you need to turn and duct the incoming air to go straight through the heat exchangers and then exit the air straight out and then turn and duct to a low pressure area.

Edited by fast-datsun

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