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How to properly install willwood brakes?


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I am finishing up with my willwood install from arizona z car and i have hit a bit of a wall with installing the proportioning valve. I want to make lines in order to have it run into my cabin (right next to my right leg). Although arizona z car supplies a good "how to" install, i feel it is lacking a bit of information. I need to know if i have to remove the distribution block from my 1975 280z, connect the front lines together, then install the willwood proportioning valve between the lines of the back brakes? Silvermine auto suggests removing the distribution block (which is bolted to the firewall) while arizona z car said to place the proportioning valve after the distribution block.

 

Any help would be much appreciated! 

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The distribution block should have no effect on proportioning. But the factory proportioning valve will. You can either eliminate it or take it apart and drill the guts out of it so it acts as a simple t-fitting. I would make a new line that goes between the distribution block or the drilled-out stock proportion valve and run it thru a hole in the firewall down the trans tunnel. Put the prop valve in reach on the tunnel then continue back through the rear bulkhead to the rear t-fitting. Put a little sign on the dash to remind you which way to turn it. I use my prop valve a fair amount. If running skinnies up front and slicks in back, I run full rear bias. If on a roadcourse I adjust as needed based on tire heating (IIRC I start with rear bias but move it forward as the tires and brakes warm up). For street driving I leave it alone and try to avoid traffic accidents and drive slow. The sign on the dash is important because you are running pretty much at 10/10 if you are going hard enough for bias to really matter and you need to keep your eyes on the road and don't want to turn it the which direction (the knob or the car). If mostly a track car, I might like the lever-style prop valve better than the knob type. It can be easier to deal with a click of adjustment rather than trying to tune a knob and drive at the same time.

Edited by RebekahsZ
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My preferred approach, similar to above, is remove both the block and valve. Install a metric to 3/16 adapter at master. Run pre-cut 3/16 line from master to a 3/16 tee, then to each of the short lines left in front with another adapter. MC rear gets adapter, 3/16 tube to New prop valve in cockpit, then 3/16 tube to another adapter at the rear tee. Measure carefully, get a cheap tubing bender, and make it all look nice!

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this proportioning valve is still causing issues since I don't want to make custom lines, (dont have the tools). I've decided to take a different approach.

 

instead I plan on buying two 10m male to m10 female invertes flare adapters so I can use my stock brake lines and install it in the engine bay on the firewall. anyone have any experience with this approach and know if it is a viable solution

 

https://m.summitracing.com/parts/aaf-all50120?seid=srese1&cm_mmc=pla-google-_-shopping-_-srese1-_-allstar-performance&gclid=CKmMvKee6dQCFQ-OfgodRIsC4A

 

these are the adapters I will be buying to screw into my willwood proportioning valve

Edited by stav2201
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You would still have to make lines from the distribution block to the proportioning valve if you are trying to just bend the factory line into the proportioning valve.

 

If you really really really really don't want to mess with that you can buy some M10x1 brake line to 3 an adapters and run 3an brake rated hose to the prop valve

 

Honestly just buy some cunifer lines. They are really affordable and bend easily by hand. If you really don't want to mess with reflaring the lines then you can buy them long and coil them around a rod fairly easily. You can also borrow the flaring tool from the parts store or buy a cheap one from harbor freight, although they don't have the best clamping force (extra C-clamp would help).

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this is a rough mockup of what I want to install. the top photo is a picture of my engine bay, the bottom is how I want it installed.

 

this is where I am a bit confused, the stock lines in my car are perfectly suitable for an install, the brass fittings on the willwood prop valve are just not 10m so I cannot use the lines.

post-11245-0-26811800-1498966475_thumb.jpg

post-11245-0-78337000-1498966504_thumb.jpeg

Edited by stav2201
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Oh I see, you removed the distribution block.

 

They used to only have the 1/8 NPT model that included the adapter to 3/8-24. Looks like they now offer them without the adapters in M10x1 (although it is for a bubble flare not inverted flare) and 3/8-24. 

 

If you have the 1/8npt model you would want to source a 1/8npt to m10x1.0 inverted flare adapter or you can double adapt.

 

Word of advice make sure to space the valve so the knob isn't hard up against the fire wall.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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