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The Ultimate Turbo FAQ/Beginners Guide


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Yes I'm getting tired of having to answer the same questions over and over again, so here are some common answers, all in one place and easy to find. I hope that those of you with helpful info to add to this post will reply and do so. Especially those guys that have been through this a few times.

 

This is intended to inform the reader of the options which exist in building up a Nissan L-series turbo engine. Specifically to give an overall picture of the cost, potential and problems associated with using this engine as a base for a performance application. Much of this info has been used without permission from various turbo websites, books and discussion forums. This is intended as a guide only. If you follow this to the letter and have a problem, no one is responsible but yourself.

 

1) Project Planning

Project planning is the key to success in any project. The first thing you need to decide is exactly what your goals are. If you hope to have a 200rwhp L-series engine, you likely don't need a turbo. If you want some serious power (200-500+ rwhp) out of the Nissan L-series, using a turbo is probably the most viable option.

 

i) Budget

Before you get going, know your budget. It’s difficult to say what you’ll need, it depends on your ability to find deals, whether you start with a complete car, how extreme your build is, and how much you do yourself. At minimum however, if you don’t have $2000 to run through a very basic swap, you probably are going to find you don’t have enough money. Nothing is worse than getting halfway through a project and losing all momentum due to lack of funds. An average performance turbo engine swap, putting out in the area of 250-275rwhp is going to cost you a minimum of $3500 if done reliably.

 

ii) So You Want a Turbo

Now you've decided that you want a turbo L-series engine. You have a performance goal in mind and its time to built it! The single most important piece of advice I can give to anyone is to research your build before you do it. (reading this is a good start!) Do yourself a favor, and track down the book "Maximum Boost" by Corky Bell. Read it a few dozen times. By that point, you should know enough about turbo systems to make educated decisions, and to ask the right questions. Also, use the search function here, and scour the internet to see what others have done. At the end of this post there is a list of links to other articles and sites on turbocharging. Some are Nissan specific, some aren't. Knowledge is the key to a successful build.

 

iii) Now for Some Technical Stuff

The best place to start is by getting a 1981-1983 Datsun 280zx Turbo engine. Either with the whole car, or just by itself. If you are planning a stock install, try and get a complete car! There are a whole mess of electronics that you will need from the donor car, AFM, ECU, Wiring harness, fuel pump, etc. The rest of this article is directed more towards a high performance buildup rather than a stock one. A word of advice, if you get the complete car, spend some time to make sure it is running well, and fix any problems BEFORE you start your swap.

 

I picked up a 1982 280zx turbo engine from a wrecker for around $200US. This included everything physically attached to the engine. It did not include the ECU, fuel pump, airflow meter, etc. This didn't matter to me because from the beginning I was planning to use a programmable engine control system to manage my engine.

 

2) Time to Get Your Head Checked

Well your engines head that is. This step is really only necessary if you plan on deviating from the stock internals, or want a freshened up engine. Many people have been successful running junkyard engines without cracking them open to inspect and rebuild. As you disassemble your engine, be sure to put everything in baggies and label it. This will save you much torture upon re-assembly. Once you get your head off, you might as well send it out to the machine shop. Try to find a shop that specializes in imports, or at the very least has done a few imports before. "How to rebuild your Nissan/Datsun OHC engine" and "How to modify your Nissan/Datsun OHC engine" are brilliant books for reference, whether you are doing the work yourself or not.

 

I sent my stock P90 head out and had it back in a couple of weeks. Give yourself extra time, machine shops are notoriously slow. If the machine shop quotes you 1 week, expect it in 2-3. For $250US my head got a performance valve job, a complete cleaning, new valve seals, all threads chased and a .010" surface plane. I was quite impressed with the work done to it. Now this is a bit of an optional step, I did a complete rebuilt on my engine, but many people have got great results just using unopened boneyard engines. Your call.

 

i) Camshafts

Remember all those things you heard about putting a hot cam in a performance engine? Forget them all. At least when you are thinking about a turbo. A turbo engine has completely different requirements than a naturally aspirated (NA) engine. For the Nissan L-series engine, the stock turbo cam should serve you well up to ~300rwhp. In general you aren't going to get the same results by putting in a "performance" turbo cam into a turbo engine, as you are when putting a "performance" NA cam into a NA engine. Generally turbo camshafts have a lower valve overlap than NA cams, to prevent exhaust gas reversion. This is caused by the exhaust manifold pressure between the valve and the turbo being higher than the boost (intake manifold) pressure. "Hot" NA cams have quite a large valve overlap, and if these cams are used in a turbo setup you'll end up hurting performance when compared to the stock cam. For over 300rwhp applications call a cam company and work with them to get the perfect grind of cam for your engine.

 

Recently there has been discussion around using the early 240z "A" cam in a turbo application. In theory it looks like a good choice, but I have little to substantiate it at this point.

 

ii) Porting and Polishing

For the less than 400rwhp crowd you don't really need to port and polish, though a general "cleanup" doesn't hurt. In the past it has been summed up to me like this. "Take the cash you'd spend on porting and polishing and spend it on a better intercooler, better turbo, better engine management, you'll end up with more for your buck this way." The P90 head already flows well enough for modest power goals. If your goals are over 400rwhp... I think you should talk to a company that specializes in Nissan L-series headwork. (Search Hybridz for a few companies represented here, they know their stuff).

 

iii) Compression Ratio

The L-series isn’t the most advanced engine out there, and as such it has some shortcomings. You may have friends that have run modest boost on a modern engine with a compression ratio in excess of 10:1. That’s not really an option on these engines, those modern engines have much better combustion chamber design, as well as cooling that allows the higher boost levels. Stock compression ratio is 7.4:1 on a factory L-series turbo engine, and represents the bottom of the range of how low to go. In most circumstances, you don’t want to exceed 8.5:1 compression ratio with the L-series. Given the choice offered by custom pistons, I would recommend around 8.25:1 for the general majority of people.

 

3) You and Your Bottom End

So now we head back to your original goals. In general Nissan overbuilt these turbo engines for the stock power goals by a large factor. They ran a very modest 7psi of boost stock. No doubt this was to ensure reliability and long life. Many have pushed the stock Nissan shortblock (the block, crank, pistons, rods, bearings, etc) to a reliable maximum of about 300rwhp. Anything over that and you are throwing reliability and longevity into the wind.

 

i) Pistons

For a really stout and reliable 300rwhp+, you should consider going with forged pistons, quality rod bolts, and a quality rebuild. Pre-detonation can kill a turbo engine by melting pistons and breaking ring lands in under a second. Forged pistons will give you a bit more of a buffer. So be careful setting up your engine, and take it easy until you know your not too lean!

 

ii) Connecting Rods

If you are planning on an engine with more than 300rwhp, rods, rod bolts, main studs, etc. should all be scrutinized and potentially upgraded as well. Many have managed to have the stock rods shot peened, and refit them with upgraded ARP studs. There are also custom aftermarket rods out there that offer another echelon of performance and reliability.

 

iii) Headgaskets

One more area of concern, the headgasket. Headgaskets rarely will blow without detonation occurring, so if you tune well you shouldn’t be concerned with it at modest power levels. If you are going nuts (over 400rwhp is nuts in a sub 2500lb car!) then you should look into block o-ringing or a metal headgasket of some sort.

 

iv) Crankshaft

Very little needs to be done to the stock L-series crankshafts to prepare them for turbo applications. A thorough inspection and polish is usually all that is needed. Because these cranks are forged, they rarely need to be resized.

 

4) Turbos

The stock Garrett T3 turbo that comes with the 280zxt is decent for up to the 250rwhp mark, with a few people closing in on 300rwhp. Approaching 300rwhp this turbo is way outside its efficiency range, and it's not recommended to push it that far. For more serious power, a more serious turbo is needed. Common choices are T3/T4e hybrids, GT30s, GT35s, etc. The T3/T4e and GT30 bolt to the stock exhaust flange (with a spacer) and have much better flow through the intake side. As a result, you can still use the stock exhaust manifold. There are lots of turbo shops in the world, and most can help you decide what is right for you. (Plus there are many posts here outlining the same thing)

 

i) Wastegate and Boost Control

The stock wastegate on the T3 turbo is pretty decent for modest performance goals (<250rwhp). In the pages listed below you can see 2 different methods of controlling your boost levels. One way is by metering the vacuum signal to the wastegate, and the other way is by threading the wastegate rod and changing the length of it. An external wastegate is a superior design to this integrated design. If you are planning high boost (over 15psi) you will probably want to design a external setup. Maximum Boost has a great section on wastegate design.

 

ii) Boost Levels

Beginners often confuse boost pressure with power. While there is a relationship between boost pressure and power output, they are not linear, and cannot be related from turbo to turbo. A stock T3 turbo does not move as much air at 7psi as a larger T4 turbo, so even though the boost levels are the same between the two turbos, the larger turbo will be pumping more air into the engine, and with corresponding increases in fuel will make more power. Bragging about boost levels is a sure fire way to tell car-savvy people you don't know what your talking about.

 

5) Exhaust System

For the exhaust system itself, 3" mandrel bent is the only way to go. (no press bends) The less exhaust restriction you have, the faster your turbo will spool up, and the less lag you will have. Again, forget about traditional concerns such as backpressure, and loss of torque with a bigger pipe, those rules don't apply to turbos. Zero restriction is perfect, but loud. A 3" system will give you excellent flow when used with a high flow muffler. Don't use a resonator in this system! The turbo itself will surpress the exhaust drone that NA 6 cylinders often get from 2000-2500 rpm. As turbo will also quiet the exhaust at about 1/3rd the rate a muffler would, all that is needed for adequate sound levels is a straight through muffler at the stock position. Exhaust is a huge bang for the buck for performance increase, and should be among the first mods done to increase horsepower and responsiveness on the turbo engine.

 

i) Exhaust Manifold Choices

Unless you are planning a 400+rwhp engine, I would recommend the stock exhaust manifold, due to its great durability and cheap price. Headers for turbo cars can run into the $2000 range to have one built. The performance and looks can both be really top notch, and for an all out build one should be considered.

 

ii) Downpipe

Take a look at the stock downpipe coming off the turbo. You'll notice an O2 sensor... and a 90 degree bend, followed by another 90 degree bend. This cast elbow and crush bent pipe are very restrictive, and have to be the poorest designed pieces on this engine. I really suggest that you get a custom made downpipe unless you are happy with the stock performance levels. In my testing, just a downpipe upgrade at stock boost levels yielded more than 10rwhp improvement. A good design would be made of 2.5" mandrel bent 304 stainless steel, with 2, 45 degree bends. Alternatively you can have it made out of mild steel and then ceramic coat it. Make sure you know how much room you have before doing this... you don't want to spend the money on a custom piece that won't fit and it is pretty tight. A 3" downpipe is possible, but makes getting at the bolts to attach it very difficult. As well, the stock T3 outlet is only 2-1/8" diameter.

 

6) Intake System

 

i) Intake Manifold Choices

As far as the intake goes, any L28 series intake will work. (you can use the one that came with the engine) However the earlier intakes (75-78) have a lot less junk attached to them, and a lot less holes. It's worth while to use one of these just to clean things up a bit. But don't panic if you can't get one, I ended up cutting and welding my stock turbo manifold to clean it up. These intakes are not superb for performance, but there are a couple of things that you can do to increase them to acceptable levels.

 

The stock intake manifold tends to cause a pretty good drop in horsepower starting at about 5500rpm. If you are looking for high rpm power, or you want 350rwhp or more, a more optimized intake configuration should be considered. Either a highly modified stocker, or a completely new, better flowing intake. Examples of both can be found using the search function on Hybridz.

 

ii) Throttle Body

A popular upgrade is to replace the stock throttle body with a 60mm unit. It may not sound like a large improvement, but the 60mm will flow almost 44% more air than the stock 50mm unit. These throttle bodies can be found on many recent cars, such as the Nissan 240sx, which is almost a bolt on mod. You may have to adapt your linkage slightly. Do yourself a favor and once you get the TB, hold it up to the intake and use a Dremel or die grinder to smooth the transition between the 2 pieces. Without doing this, there is no point in upgrading the throttle body! (but make sure you aren't sending aluminum shavings into your engine... remove the intake!)

 

iii) Intercooler

This is the other area to dump cash into! A cheap intercooler will take you no where, and not quickly either. Expect to spend more than $300 for a quality unit. This is the heart and soul of a turbo engine, so do your research well. Spearco offers nice units, but at a pretty high price. A common performance intercooler is the Isuzu NPR intercooler. If you luck out you can get one used for under $250. Generally when it comes to intercooling a high performance engine you want the biggest intercooler you can find. I wince a little when I say that. A good design is more important than the size of the unit. Read up on what makes a good intercooler and make an educated choice.

 

iv) Blow Off Valve

This modification is highly recommended on any turbo Z car. When the throttle plate closes the air is still being pushed out of the turbo, it hits the throttle plate and reverses towards the turbo impeller. This collision causes the turbo to slow down spinning. Which means that every time you shift gears the turbo will slow down its spin. Not good! Adding a simple blowoff valve between the turbo and the throttle body will drastically improve this problem. You can spend $200 and get one from Greddy, HKS, Turbosmart... or you can go to the wreckers and try to locate on off a Talon/Eclipse/Laser Turbo from '90-94. $40 or so and it should be yours. Remember that because a BOV releases air from the intake track, if you are using the stock air flow meter you will be letting out metered air, messing with your air/fuel mixture. If you are running a stock computer system, the best plan is to route the BOV outlet back into the intake system.

 

v) Pop Off Valve

This device was included on the L-series turbo engines as a method of engine protection. While it doesn't influence performance at stock boost levels, if you plan on running more than about 7psi boost it will need to be modified or removed. If removed, you've eliminated your overboost protection! While this is not necessarily a problem for those that have knowledge about their level of tune and boost levels, for beginners it is recommended that you leave this in place and gain some experience with the turbo engine before removing.

 

7) Engine Management

Big decision. If you are planning on running more than about 225rwhp, I wouldn't get stuck on the stock system. This is one area to dish out the cash that you saved by not porting and polishing. For under $750US you can get a fully programmable system to run your ignition and fuel delivery. If you think you are going to want more power the future, this is the only way to go! It offers nearly infinite flexibility. If you want a stock system, you'll have to do some searching here to figure out the exact wiring mods needed.

 

i) Fuel Delivery

First thing, you'll likely want a new fuel line if you plan on pushing 300rwhp. I expect a 3/8" feed line would provide enough flow for a 350rwhp car. 5/16" is a good size for a return line. You are also going to need a high pressure fuel pump. New ones are nice, but if you want to go used try to get one out of a high performance car with a larger displacement than 2.8liters. Something like a BMW 535, 635, 735 could do. A 300zxtt, Supra tt, etc. would likely also do. The Walbro 255 pump is another good choice that won't break the bank. Depends how wild you want to go.

 

While you are wiring in your new fuel pump (make sure you use a relay for it) now is a good time for a little theft protection. Run a hidden toggle switch on the line that triggers your fuel pump relay. As long as you remember to turn it off every time you get out of the car, it's a pretty decent way to keep your car where you left it.

 

ii) Injectors

Those stock 260cc/min injectors aren't gonna cut it much over 200rwhp. You can cheat a little by running higher than stock fuel pressure through them, but this is not an ideal fix. A common OEM injector that can support around 275rwhp is the 370cc/min Ford Merkur/SVO injectors. They are considerably cheaper than high performance injectors, and will fit in the Z with some modifications. Beware, you're going to need a custom fuel rail if you go this route. (Which can clean up the look of your engine considerably) Look at the sticky thread in this forum for more injector options.

 

8) Oil

This is an often debated topic. I strongly suggest that anyone building up a turbo engine plan to run fully synthetic oil for the life of the engine, after it has been broken in. Synthetic oil is simply going to stand up better to the high heat that oil sees in turbocharged engines. If you absolutely will not run synthetic for some reason, try to use a straight weight motor oil. These oils are more stable than the multiweight (such as 10W-30, 20W-50) oils. This stability helps prevent oil 'coking' which is a common cause of turbo failure. However, you don't want to use synthetic motor oils for the break in period. They simply lubricate too well to allow your engine to go through the proper break in cycle. Also, its generally recommended that you change your oil every 500miles during break in. That gets mighty expensive if running synthetic.

 

Another option that will allow you to run less expensive oil, is a water cooled center section on your turbo. At this point you are going with an upgraded turbo over the stocker, and hopefully have some knowledge to go with it. An oil cooler would also potentially offer you enough headroom to run less expensive oil. With all that said, I run an oil cooler and still use synthetic, and would recommend that option for anyone that is running a high dollar turbo engine hard.

 

9) Closing Remarks

You'll notice that a lot of the advice in this article revolves around how to make a low budget, high performance turbo engine. It really shouldn't be difficult to have a 250rwhp engine for around $3500. Use some creativity and search autowreckers for OEM parts that may work. (such as the Isuzu NPR intercooler, eclipse BOV, Merkur/Svo injectors) Take the time to research your product before you buy and you will save yourself money. There is nothing worse than paying top dollar for a part that you don't need!

 

Recommended Internet Reading:

 

http://www.eng.fsu.edu/~jthagard/

 

http://www.sdsefi.com (Good tech articles here)

http://www.stealth316.com/1-tech.htm

 

http://www.geocities.com/z_design_studio/transmission.html

http://www.zhome.com/ZCMnL/tech/turbo.html

 

Updated: April 17, 2009

Edited by Drax240z
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Guest JAMIE T

'Bout time Drax! I think I got you to put it back on the web about 8 months ago. I remember seeing it about 2 years ago, then I couldn't find it anymore.

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Guest bastaad525

A great writeup :) but I'm not so sure about how you worded that first part.... I think it's kind of a bad thing to make it sound like you and possibly lots of other guys here are tired of answering questions, even if they are ones asked commonly, and it would suck to give 'newbs' here that idea.... while I agree lots of questions get asked here that the answer could probably easily be found (I'm sure I've asked more than my fair share of these) isn't the point of a board like this to be a place where the unknowledgeable can ask these types of questions of those more knowledgeable than themselves and hope to be lead in the right direction? Also, one thing looking in archives can't always provide is the 'newest trend' or the latest opinions. For instance, not more than a few months ago I was under the impression that the Starion intercooler was a great I/C for use on a turbo Z. I gathered this from what people here and at Zcar.com were saying. Now the opinion is that they are actually not very good at all.... However depending on how I specified my search I might turn up a lot of posts or info that would still give me the impression that it's a good unit. Also, there's always someone doing something better, every day someone comes up with some new more efficient way to do something, and by just posting a question for this or that, even after searching the archives, you can be more certain to get that latest greatest idea. Just my .02

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A great writeup :) but I'm not so sure about how you worded that first part.... I think it's kind of a bad thing to make it sound like you and possibly lots of other guys here are tired of answering questions, even if they are ones asked commonly, and it would suck to give 'newbs' here that idea.... while I agree lots of questions get asked here that the answer could probably easily be found (I'm sure I've asked more than my fair share of these) isn't the point of a board like this to be a place where the unknowledgeable can ask these types of questions of those more knowledgeable than themselves and hope to be lead in the right direction? Also, one thing looking in archives can't always provide is the 'newest trend' or the latest opinions. For instance, not more than a few months ago I was under the impression that the Starion intercooler was a great I/C for use on a turbo Z. I gathered this from what people here and at Zcar.com were saying. Now the opinion is that they are actually not very good at all.... However depending on how I specified my search I might turn up a lot of posts or info that would still give me the impression that it's a good unit. Also, there's always someone doing something better, every day someone comes up with some new more efficient way to do something, and by just posting a question for this or that, even after searching the archives, you can be more certain to get that latest greatest idea. Just my .02

 

Now that the write-up is in "sticky" form, the information can be kept up to date, and prevent the pitfalls you are identifying.

 

Nice job Drax!

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First suggested update.

 

Add to the Intercooler section, something to the effect that: as a rule of thumb, never consider an OEM I/C that was supplied with an engine that made less HP than the L28ET. The big benefit of an I/C to an L28ET is that it greatly reduces the intake charge temp, allowing you to raise the boost w/o introducing excessive heat. Raising the boost increases HP and HP equates to flow. If an OEM I/C was designed to support the flow of a 160hp engine (Starion, e.g.), will it support an L28ET when the boost is increased? It will if you think the OEMs designed their I/C with 40-50% extra capacity. The exception to this rule are those designed for big desiels (sp?).

 

Crap, probably too long so edit as you see fit.

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Actually I don't think I'll edit it at all, and just let people read the whole thread.

 

For those newbies: Listen to Scottie-GNZ. ;) Very much of what I wrote is directly related to his experience with the L28 turbo, and his knack at finding affordable, and very effective solutions and upgrades. Big kudos to Scottie, which I should have added in my origional post.

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Update for stock wiring:

 

This is untested by me, but might get people going on the right path:

 

You need to get a Haynes manual for '79 to '83 280ZX. This is the one with the red cover. Look on page 252, this is the wiring diagram. You will see 3 plugs labeled "1,2,3" with circles around the numbers. This is at the lower left-hand side of the page.

 

The wires are as follows:

 

Plug 1= BR 12v power source. Positive

 

G 12v power source. Positive

 

Plug 2=Y start signal (+)

GL ground for inhibitor switch

YW speed sensor (not necessary)

Y A/C signal (+)

YW coil (-) (must use ignitor)

B fuel pump ground if using modulator

 

Plug 3=LR fuel pump relay

G ignition .signal (+) for air regulator

W not used

Y not used

BW ignition signal (+)

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Guest Anonymous

Thanks (im sure one of many) but as a person who is going to be doing the swap, and asking some of those questions i give you much thanks. :burnout: <-------- be doing that soon hopefully

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  • 1 month later...
I sent my P90 head out and had it back in a couple of weeks. Give yourself enough time. If the machine shop quotes you 1 week, expect it in 2-3. For $250US my head got a performance valve job, a complete cleaning, new valve seals, all threads chased and a .010" surface plane. I was quite impressed with the work done to it.

 

But that doesnt include the cost of valves does it? :( I'm thinking of doing complete rebuild on my N/A engine (but im rebuilding to support boost cuz I do want to turbocharge it). What do you suggest as far as valves?

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I sent my P90 head out and had it back in a couple of weeks. Give yourself enough time. If the machine shop quotes you 1 week, expect it in 2-3. For $250US my head got a performance valve job, a complete cleaning, new valve seals, all threads chased and a .010" surface plane. I was quite impressed with the work done to it.

 

But that doesnt include the cost of valves does it? :( I'm thinking of doing complete rebuild on my N/A engine (but im rebuilding to support boost cuz I do want to turbocharge it). What do you suggest as far as valves?

 

Stock valves, if you need them. When I had a head built with a turbo camshaft, my head builder flowed a stock exhaust valve vs. a larger (not sure how much, 2mm?) valve on a stock bore. The bigger valve did not flow as much as stock, supposedly due to shrouding by a stock bore cylinder. If you are doing a bigger bore, you would probably get different results.

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  • 5 months later...
Update for stock wiring:

 

This is untested by me' date=' but might get people going on the right path:

 

[i']You need to get a Haynes manual for '79 to '83 280ZX. This is the one with the red cover. Look on page 252, this is the wiring diagram. You will see 3 plugs labeled "1,2,3" with circles around the numbers. This is at the lower left-hand side of the page.

 

The wires are as follows:

 

Plug 1= BR 12v power source. Positive

 

G 12v power source. Positive

 

Plug 2=Y start signal (+)

GL ground for inhibitor switch

YW speed sensor (not necessary)

Y A/C signal (+)

YW coil (-) (must use ignitor)

B fuel pump ground if using modulator

 

Plug 3=LR fuel pump relay

G ignition .signal (+) for air regulator

W not used

Y not used

BW ignition signal (+)[/i]

 

where did you find that ? I looked and looked for that, of course now I need to find a haynes manual

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  • 1 month later...

fuel and spark only.

 

 

(by the battery)

Fusible link box wiring:

Plug 1= BR 12v power source. Positive

G 12v power source. Positive

these two wires are the only ones needed from that big ol box, you can cut the other ones off to simplify.

 

(found right next to ecu pins)

Plug 2=Y start signal (+) --------connected this to the spade connection on the starter-have disconnected it and while the car will still start, it starts faster with it hooked up for that oem feel.

 

GL ground for inhibitor switch-----not needed.

YW speed sensor (not necessary) -----not needed.

Y A/C signal (+)

YW coil (-) (must use ignitor) -------goes to y/w on ignitor or ignitor - if you dont have the connector for the ignitor. other pin on ignitor goes to the ignition switch, you can use the existing b/w wire or other colored wire that is already there to supply the other side of the ignitor.

B fuel pump ground if using modulator-----not needed.

 

 

By the Battery

Plug 3=LR fuel pump relay ------- trigger wire for bosch relay ( substituted for nissan relay for easier replacement and standard relay wiring logic, in my car i used this to trigger another relay with a 10ga hotwire, L/R is what makes the fuel pump cycle for five seconds when you turn the key on, and is good to use because if the car stalls the pump shuts off after 5 seconds. L/R=blue/red,

G ignition .signal (+) for air regulator ----not needed.cut

W not used -----cut

Y not used ------cut

BW ignition signal (+): This wire is found connected to the green efi relay, cut this and wire it to on/start of ignition key switch.

 

now BOOST.

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Guest 78Zboy

I was wondering if i could use my L28 motor out of my 78 Z. I know that this is probably a stupid question but i am just wondering. Sorry if this pisses anybody off.

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