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About PrincePaul

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  1. Thanks Probably go with the S12W now and 15/16 master. Rear drums just stock but new parts. Over at the http://www.classiczcars.com forum there are actually more guys running this exact setup.
  2. Yeah seems that the 1988 l4 4runner setup is best suited together with rear disc conversion - balance wise. With the calculations in the beginning that setup would have 75/25 bias. So thats more off the MK63 (80/20) to the S12W (79/21), but the gained clearance to the wheel is a nice benefit. Ah... so many options. Stock seems to be the easiest - yes. I check that forum out - thanks for the tip.
  3. Why more horsepower with a carb

    I don`t know for what price you`ll get a efi setup with ITBs but tripple weber (just the hardware) is about 1500 +- 250€, and the efi ITBs alone is about 3500-4000$ https://www.efihardware.com/products/c388/Nissan-6-Cylinder-Throttle-Body-Kits The jenvey kit is not much cheaper where you have the weber look with injection. than you don`t even have all the sensors and the ecu. But as I said Weber for a mild performance gain together with cam, exhaust and intake is probably a good way. For myself I`m also kinda a nerd with electronic hardware and do a lot of pc related stuff. But thats why its even more appealing for me to do a carb conversion as of the modern cars have enough electronic to play around with. And my daily will always be such a car. So to go back to the roots - at least for me - is really interesting Thanks for the comments anyway, I just wanted to rectify that I don`t loose power or make the overall performance worse with converting from stock EFI to tripple Weber.
  4. @Miles Thanks, yeah I read a lot of these threads. I think you already wrote some similar lines in the other ones. As far as I am aware of the other thread with bias calculations were always with rear disc conversion. So we all know that the original MK63 conversion works well. It was designed by nissan... so big vented brakes in the front and a drum in the back. Sumitomo build both calipers the MK63 and later the S12W and according to other threads they are not so different in design. BTW out of jdmjunkies.ch: MK63 Solid disk type including brake-pads: 4.300 KgsStandard two pot OEM including brake-pads: 4.445 Kgs what I found on an other side is 3,8 kg for the vented MK63 without pads - not really comparable. I guess the disc would be the most in weight difference between solid and vented. Can`t find any figures for the S12W, everybody is saying that its heavier but no one postet weights. For the distance from piston center to mounting point I didn`t found proper drawings yet. Because the one you find for MK63 say 261mm disc diameter with the non vented version. But that has to be 271mm as they used the stock rotor... I`ve seen another thread here with a guy who ran S12-8 vented and swapped to S12W due to better race pad availability and was saying that they are more or less the same - driving wise. The other Toyota vented version (different piston sizes in each caliper) should be the S12-8s but I can`t find a kit anywhere. So the question is: Is there a noticeable difference between the MK63 vented with 13/16 rear cylinder (FIA brake setup) and the S12W with 7/8 rear cylinder. Brake bias, weight etc - noticeable difference while driving, not only on the calculator. If there is a bigger difference in brake bias, is that changeable via a manual proportion valve or is it hopeless like with some rear disc swaps where even NO proportionvalve is not enough pressure to the rear.
  5. The above mentioned thread was one of which I read the past couple of days and is exactly what I meant. The majority is going to a rear disc conversion straight away and there is not much information about combinations with rear drums. yeah the calculation is simple but to compare the two variances it should be sufficient. I will try to go a bit deeper into pad sizes and piston to mounting position distance later. benefits of a manual proportion valve would also be a bit reduced hose/line clutter in the engine bay. If I use this black one from willwood with two Front outputs. So there is no need for the Hydraulic block on the left side plus the original proportion valve. As I’m building new lines anyway I can get the right adapters for the willwood part straight on the lines. my way of thinking was if Nissan design a system like that it’s properly working and properly thought after. The question is am I right with my understanding of the competition catalog that they really just changed the front to mk63 and the rear cylinders and nothing else. yes unsprung weight is a thing. I have to find the article but there was a Swiss guy who weight both. The stock and the non vented 4 piston calipers and the Toyota’s were actually lighter. Of course the vented disks are heavier than the solid ones. So does the wider wheel/tire package I want to use. the question is what do you notice more. I don’t know. Probably a discussion for another thread. KW coilovers, poly bushings and swaybars should upgrade the suspension in a way that it should take care of. A bit off topic but the tc rod problems with poly bushings is still the same on 280z’s or only on 240’s? @NewZed what do you think about the calculations do they make sense to you? still hoping that someone who actually runs this system sees that thread
  6. Ill have a look on that thread tomorrow. But the leverage shout be the same as the mounting points are the same. And with something that stays the same you don`t need to take it into account. If you check the length and width of the front brakes pads the just vary a couple mm. Now its definitely not the "real" brake bias. But for a comparison between sys A and B should be sufficient. Just have to check the distance between the mounting points and the cylinders but that should be also vary minimal from MK63 and S12W. I know of someone running that setup, but he is just driving normal. So I don`T know if he ever tried or checked which locks up first. thought that at least a couple are running that setup. Anyway, thanks for the link. Will study it tomorrow
  7. Are you sure about that stage 4 kit? Because it says 43mm pistons. So that should be the S12W. I don`t worry about drums in the back. The all new VW up GTI for example weighs also around 1 to and has drums in the back like the Z. I just want to know if somebody runs them with the S12W in the front. Alright how about that: So the FIA Brakes are 4 piston with 41,3 mm dia the rear drum cylinder are 13/16" so 20,6375 mm dia. So in total you`ve 8 pistons up front which combined have 10717,168mm² while the backs are two pistons each side so four in total with 2676,048 mm² together. S12W are 43 mm dia and stock 280z rear drum cylinder are 7/8 so 22,225 mm dia. Same number of pistons so up front 11617,608 mm² and rear 3103,584 mm². That makes a 80/20 distribution with the MK63 FIA brakes and 78,9/21,1 with the S12W and stock drums. Mounting points are the same so you don`t have different leaver. Considering you run the same pad compounds. Which have almost the same dimensions as well. What do you think, can you calculate it like that? As far as my understanding goes that was all they changed when you upgraded to the MK63 brakes. Front calipers and the rear wheel cylinders. So even with a stock proportion valve the S12W should work. I mean its a 1% difference... I know thats not the real brake Distribution but to have a comparison value between these two systems.
  8. Basically nothing without proper certification about the strengt and its function. I don`t know the specific test they have go trough to get that tiny piece of paper so I can bolt it on my car. But all these cnc machined aluminium suspension parts from T3 for example will never be road legal here. This whole certification process is so expensive that a lot of aftermarket parts are not available in germany. Even steel braided lines have to be certified in a specific way. So if I would buy some in the US which are pressure tested to amount X and lets say aircraft grade hoses what ever. They still won`t accept it even thou you know they are working fine. So everything has to look kinda OEM. That together with an old car they probably have never seen before makes it easier to get it trough. Wheels will be another story, sometimes your lucky and the rim has the material stamped in. So with the axle load they can check in their database if it works or not together with a clearance check and everything. Do you know a company which sells a 12-8 vented Kit? @seattlejester thats why I will replace any component which has orings or fluid contact with new parts. If the rear went the front should still work. Isn`t that the reason why the Z has this dual reservoir setup on the master? Tire sizes are not a big problem as long as they don`t rub and the speedo is still correct. So they drive up a ramp only with the front right and rear left so the car goes on full compression and there has to be a certain amount of space between the body panels and the tire. Steering has to be safe as well while doing that.
  9. Alright, thanks for the input. So I`ll definitely buy steel braided lines and I also replace all hardlines to be on the safe side. The looks point of a disk setup is really strong in this forum I have to agree. Just when you scroll through the brake threads. The first thing is rear disk conversion... What I want to accomplish with that "upgrade", is a longer lasting brake that makes use out of the semi slick tires and holds that level of brake bite. As I`m replacing every component which is in touch with fluid or has o rings inside anyway. My way of thinking was to spend a little bit more and get better parts in straight away. So basically it doesn`t make any difference if I buy a new 7/8 master or a new 15/16 master. By the way willwood or Arizona Z or whatever setup where you see straight away that this is not factory. Massiv milled aluminium parts in red, orange etc. is not gonna happen here in germany if you want the car road legal. With the toyota setup you are still able to show them the nissan competition catalog and that should be alright. Its not that easy here with all these regulations... I just found out that the rear wheel cylinder is 7/8 original iaw the FSM. So thats actually bigger than what they used for the FIA brake with the vented rotors. Which were 13/16".
  10. Why more horsepower with a carb

    Alright, that pretty much concludes what I thought/read over the last days. Probably go tripple weber than. For myself I can`t justify the price of a modern EFI with the old ITB or carb look. Especially as I`m not planning to run 300 HP.
  11. Why more horsepower with a carb

    Some news here? Would be interesting to see some dyno sheets of some kind. L28 EFI vs. L28 tripple weber Of course you get more mileage out of the EFI setup but what happens to hp/torque. Am I understanding it right, that when you change the exhaust and to an other cam that its hard to tune the stock EFI to it?
  12. Hello Guys, first post and straight a brake thread - I`m sorry, but I read hours on hours in the FAQ section and in a lot of other brake related threads but couldn't find anybody who has done this. So on the weekend I bought a 78 280Z and I´d like to go down the performance road while still keep it kinda periodic correct so I don`t get problems with TÜV in germany and a historic licence plate. So the car will get fully striped down, an exterior backdate to 240z, suspension upgrades, fender flares, exhaust, maybe tripple weber (have to inform myself a bit more on that vs EFI) etc. etc. A lot of people go straight to a rear disk brake conversion and complain about the brake bias and sometimes even damaged axels due to a different load on them compared to drums. Basically thats not what I wanna do plus the TÜV thing mentioned above. But what about keeping the drums in the rear, change the front to S12W and go with a 15/16 master. If I`ve seen that correctly thats what they did back in the day with the original FIA brake upgrade out of the competition catalog. They just went with 13/16 wheel cylinders inside the drums. (not sure about the mastercylinder with FIA brakes...) I just can`t find the size of the original cylinders inside the drums... Somebody did that conversion here in the forums? Is it working well with the original proportion valve or is a manual one capable of dialing in a proper brake bias? Probably have to run a couple calculations to find out (which seems not that easy with drums). But as of the drums are able to create a higher brake force with less hydraulic input they should work better as a rear disc conversion. What do you think? Any help or experience is welcome