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Hello I have never welded before and was hoping that you all can tell me if I should buy a "mig welder" and attempt to spot weld my entire car myself?  If so any ideas of the most inexpensive machine and possible advice on how to learn to do myself? 

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Hello, it has been reported that you have posted in the FAQ section. This seems to be a recurring issue. Please take a second and make sure you are in the actual forum section instead of the FAQ section prior to posting as the FAQ section does not allow for replies.

 

Everlast mig, harborfreight omni, hobart handler, lincoln hd, are some affordable mig units. If you are asking how to weld, planning to do something like this is probably out of your reach at the moment. There are some great videos on youtube, but really you need someone to critique you and give you some active hints to really get a good feel for it. They will also be able to tell you if your machine is problematic, welding on a bad machine it can almost be impossible to get a good bead.

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Buy one on craigslist and practice. Gas is required don't mess around with flux core. Or.... make a friend with a welder. 

 

Additional thought... I would give some serious consideration to how beneficial stitch welding you chassis will be. I did mine where I was already doing repairs, a "while I am in there" sort of thing. But it's a real pain in the ass. Stripping undercoating, paint, seam sealer, cleaning out the joint. Welding, screwing it up, grinding it back out and then rewelding. If you don't already have the skills and equipment, I would focus on other a parts of the build while you acquire skills/equipment.  I don't mean this to be discouraging, just saying, don't over focus on a "need" to stitch weld your chassis. 

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Hello,

Years ago when I checked with my local resto house about performing a bunch of required welding on my 65 Mustang, I was given the estimate of $15K for the rust repair only. Being a hands-on guy, I allocated $2K for body shop tools, including a MIG. After which, I researched and practiced. ^ years later my Mustang was on the road , with 90% of my own hands. To this day, that welder has paid for itself many times over. 

Don't cut yourself short, earn to weld and you'll never regret it.  

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If you have a "Robert's Oxygen" dealer in your area, you might contact them for someone in their shop, who might provide some direction. Also, don't overlook Community colleges offer courses too, at least, the ones in our area.  

Once you learn the fundamentals it's all practice. Also, should you pursue to learn, purchase the best auto-darkening helmet you can afford. Again, a "Robert's" has all of the necessary supplies. Maybe, they'll have a used MIG or TIG they'll let go for a good price. One of the tougher aspects of welding on auto bodies, is the metal is thin and one has to master tuning equipment and learning the technique to prevent "blowing" bigger holes in the panel, with the holes you're attempting to close LOL!

 Hopefully, you have a welder's supply or shop in your area.  Good Luck!

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A lesson is worth whatever they charge. I've taught a few people, some who have said they have welded before, and they also end up way better after about 20-30 minutes with a bit of tutelage. I've taught someone while I was under the car just based off of how the welds sound. Might be worth while going to your local welding shop and seeing if anyone has time to give you a lesson on a day off, or as many have said take a weekend class at a trade school or community college. Or you can lookup local people who have good technique and ask if they have an hour or two you could bother them for or pay to inconvenience. 

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On 8/1/2018 at 2:09 PM, seattlejester said:

Hello, it has been reported that you have posted in the FAQ section. This seems to be a recurring issue. Please take a second and make sure you are in the actual forum section instead of the FAQ section prior to posting as the FAQ section does not allow for replies.

 

Everlast mig, harborfreight omni, hobart handler, lincoln hd, are some affordable mig units. If you are asking how to weld, planning to do something like this is probably out of your reach at the moment. There are some great videos on youtube, but really you need someone to critique you and give you some active hints to really get a good feel for it. They will also be able to tell you if your machine is problematic, welding on a bad machine it can almost be impossible to get a good bead.

I agree that you'll benefit immensely by having a mentor.  Also, you're probably in for a lot of work so you'll need to really love it.  I use an Eastwood 135 MIG, which is great for doing body work on my Z.  Youtube and the Eastwood site are great references.  Good luck!

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I have a Northern Tool 135 MIG.  Don't even try the flux-core around the Datsun sheet metal.  Find a source for the shielding gas - it's not as common as you might think.  Airgas near me won't do the small bottles anymore - I go to Praxair.  Find a source for the metal.  I use 18 ga. which is slightly thicker than the original metal.  So far, my patching is mostly butt-welding.  Practice that on the metal you bought, leap-frogging until the stitches are continuous, then grind it down to see if it looks like one, solid bit of metal.  Get a $50 grinder rather than a $15 grinder.

 

Watch every Youtube that you can, and watch the Velocity shows where they do similar work.  I couldn't readily find any local 'hobby' training; the community college stuff is more career-oriented (have you seen what they make?!!).

 

If you read my other posts, you'll see I actually have no experience at all, except on my Z.  But I think you may be in the same position as me.  There is no way you can cost-justify professional welding.

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