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Home Built by Jeff

Home Built Z 'Full video build'

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Jeff,

A couple of tips from doing these things in the shop over the years:

 

Take the hatch off and put it on two stands (one stand isn't big enough unless you use some lumber).  Set the glass while (or whilst) on the stands and then reinstall the hatch.

OR

Prop up the hatch slightly with supports underneath while it's on the car.  Start your string at the top and work to the bottom.

 

Use a larger diameter cord.  We use a 1/4" cotton cord and soak it in water for lubrication.  (I originally used a thin cord thinking it would be easier to pull and have used various lubes (usually soap) BUT wet cotton thickish cord works the very best - easy to pull and goes quickly (here in the U.S. it's the type of cord that was used for "clothes line" (outdoors for hanging clothes to dry) back in the day)

 

Lastly -  you may not be re-installing the stainless trim in the weatherstrip BUT don't do it after the glass has been set.  IF you're installing trim, do it before you set the glass!

 

(A little note: some people don't realize that the trim is not just for looks.  The stainless steel trim pieces actually help hold the weatherstrip to shape and keep it from pulling away from the body at the corners.  You will notice this much more on the windshield glass.  I know many people don't like the "chrome" look these days, but there was actually a purpose for those strips.)

Chuck

Sakura Garage

 

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2 hours ago, cgsheen said:

Jeff,

A couple of tips from doing these things in the shop over the years:

 

Take the hatch off and put it on two stands (one stand isn't big enough unless you use some lumber).  Set the glass while (or whilst) on the stands and then reinstall the hatch.

OR

Prop up the hatch slightly with supports underneath while it's on the car.  Start your string at the top and work to the bottom.

 

Use a larger diameter cord.  We use a 1/4" cotton cord and soak it in water for lubrication.  (I originally used a thin cord thinking it would be easier to pull and have used various lubes (usually soap) BUT wet cotton thickish cord works the very best - easy to pull and goes quickly (here in the U.S. it's the type of cord that was used for "clothes line" (outdoors for hanging clothes to dry) back in the day)

 

Lastly -  you may not be re-installing the stainless trim in the weatherstrip BUT don't do it after the glass has been set.  IF you're installing trim, do it before you set the glass!

 

(A little note: some people don't realize that the trim is not just for looks.  The stainless steel trim pieces actually help hold the weatherstrip to shape and keep it from pulling away from the body at the corners.  You will notice this much more on the windshield glass.  I know many people don't like the "chrome" look these days, but there was actually a purpose for those strips.)

Chuck

Sakura Garage

 

Soaking the cord in water is a great tip, as often we are pulling it really hard to get it out. As for the trim, I am not putting it in in this case, as the car didn't have any when I bought it, and I have deleted the chrome from this car anyway, but good to know.

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A few years ago I started using a bleeding pattern that is different than most.  I bleed the master cylinder (in the car) first with tubes from the bleed ports back into the reservoirs.  Then I actually start with the closest brake hardware (not the furthest as conventional wisdom states) and follow to next closest until I'm finished.  (I do not use a vacuum bleeder but whatever works for you...)  Doing it manually (and by myself) it usually only requires 3-4 pumps of the pedal at each wheel to fully bleed the system.  I've had much better and more consistent results doing it that way.

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1 hour ago, cgsheen said:

A few years ago I started using a bleeding pattern that is different than most.  I bleed the master cylinder (in the car) first with tubes from the bleed ports back into the reservoirs.  Then I actually start with the closest brake hardware (not the furthest as conventional wisdom states) and follow to next closest until I'm finished.  (I do not use a vacuum bleeder but whatever works for you...)  Doing it manually (and by myself) it usually only requires 3-4 pumps of the pedal at each wheel to fully bleed the system.  I've had much better and more consistent results doing it that way.

I am completely open to trying different options. My logical mind would say that starting at the closest and ending at the furthest would be the best way. That way all the bubbles get pushed further down the line until they exit, but I really think that part makes very little difference. I will give it another go and see.

Edited by Home Built by Jeff

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Also stated in the YouTube comment, I love speed bleeders. But what I didn't mention, is that you could/should use them for clutch bleeding too. :-) Makes emergency roadside clutch bleeding far more likely to be successful.

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Posted (edited)

Jeff, it's just a switch...  The easy way to test the fuel pump is just to "jumper" the oil pressure switch temporarily.  Pull the wires off the switch and connect them together.  That'll give the fuel pump relay the impression that the engine has oil pressure (the switch is "made"). 

 

I winched a little when you first mentioned "2 green wires" to the fuel pump - I knew only one of those was power to the electric fuel pump...  Ground (Earth) wiring in Datsun's is always Black. (and Black/White is battery voltage).

Edited by cgsheen

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4 hours ago, cgsheen said:

Jeff, it's just a switch...  The easy way to test the fuel pump is just to "jumper" the oil pressure switch temporarily.  Pull the wires off the switch and connect them together.  That'll give the fuel pump relay the impression that the engine has oil pressure (the switch is "made"). 

 

I winched a little when you first mentioned "2 green wires" to the fuel pump - I knew only one of those was power to the electric fuel pump...  Ground (Earth) wiring in Datsun's is always Black. (and Black/White is battery voltage).

Now you tell me ;)

 

I will jump it for now, but I may need to look into changing the brass fittings as apparently they have been known to fail after extended vibration. 

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Jeff,

I've been following your channel since the DIY mandrel pipe bender. Always good stuff. Your Z has come a long way from the time it rolled into your shop. Definitely inspiration for the days when I want to give up on mine. 

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