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mtnickel

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Everything posted by mtnickel

  1. mtnickel

    Mustang turbo 4 Engine

    It’s iust a cost thing. If you have access to the parts car, the oem harness is pretty complete. Also the service manual for ford is very good and easy to read. I figured out which wires needed power or ignition power fairly in a few hours. PATS removal was $250 sent to Eric at HP tuners.
  2. mtnickel

    rb25/26 rear sump custom oil pans??

    I'd almost rather not say...🤭 once i welded them all up and ground them down i mixed up a batch of JB weld and applied it over all the welds. lol. redneck, but effective. If you were really OCD, you could silicone your pan down to a flat surface and then pressure test it through the drain plug. Spritz it with soapy water and look for bubbles. Instead of JB weld, epoxy primer would probably seal as well.
  3. mtnickel

    rb25/26 rear sump custom oil pans??

    If photobucket didn't destroy my rb25 build thread, you'd see we arrived at the exact same mods (Circa Aug 2013). mine however stayed looking like your original version. Haha. To account for the cant of the engine, I simply cut off at an angle. Windage tray I put back in as is, but bent all the louvers the opposite direction. Sump, I wish I had some fancier measuring tools. Once the welds were ground and painted, it wasn't so bad. I may remove it and add some trap doors and wings for extra capacity. All this RB oil woes makes me nervous (though I know it is mostly overblown). Nice work on your 2nd attempt. Looks amazing.
  4. Had a post about the design process and checking of clearance in the Drivetrain section. Now here's the sale post of the adapters I've made several sets of. Quick Description: Z31T weld on adapter Flanges to fit Z31T CV axles into S30 chassis with the use of an R200. Long Description: They weld onto the outboard axle flange to provide a bolt pattern that will fit Z31 Turbo axles. The axles are NLA but you can find them on forums, craigslist, car-part.com, ebay, etc. They are a very strong axle. It is for an R200 diff, not stock R180. Rockauto has recently has some new style axles. The CV type is tripod which is a little weaker and the axle shaft diameter is fair bit smaller. no idea how much power they will support. 1) They are weld on style. They must be welded by someone with a little experience since you're welding to the stock cast flange. They also must be bolted down if you want the flange to remain flat. They also must be centered into the square relief. The Square flange IS NOT concentric to the rotational axis and it must be shimmed and positioned correctly so that there is minimal runout. *** A JIG is now available to rent that both locates center and keeps the parts flat during the welding process. $20 + shipping to the next user. 2) They require grinding the stub axle nut and shaft between 1/16-1/8" depending on if its 240 or 280 style. Basically enough so that the flange is flat. 3) They still require flipping the cages inside the CV. I've measured that on the Driverside it would be fine (only 2.5mm of clearance) without, but I'd do it anyways. Passenger side is tighter and needs it. 4). Material is mild steel. Paint or powdercoat (if you remove the stock flange to weld) at your own will to prevent corrosion. I've got a PDF of the instructions for install attached. Sets are $205 USD shipped when paid with "friends/family" otherwise I get charged fees. Z31 Turbo CV axle Conversion-v3.pdf
  5. Got a new batch of flanges all done. Some of the costs went up marginally unfortunately. Now $205 Shipped and request you pay via friends/family to cut down on my fees. Jig rental cost down to $20 from $30 however. Total $225 with Jig rental, plus you ship jig to next user.
  6. mtnickel

    Mustang turbo 4 Engine

    Fuel shouldn’t be much different than regular as the high pressure pump is in the engine. Just a standard return style fuel system feeding will work. Oe is returnless, but this can be adjusted in the tune. Other concern is is the security of the oe ecu. Has what’s called PATS. Won’t start without key signal which usually interfaces with the stock cluster. So you’d need Custer as well if you want to retain a working ecu. We put a 5.0 coyote into a friends 79 Volvo. For the 2014 model we were able to ship the ecu to a guy at hp tuners and have him delete the pats. Old models you could delete it in the tune, but new ones require a physical advancded mod/programming of the ecu. Alternatively you could try and load a performance pack firmware which has no security, but they don’t run nearly as well as oe code. I looked at the engine as an option, but the sound of the I6 swayed me.
  7. Roger that. Will try and get on them ready for first or second week of Jan
  8. Just sold last set, but I’m ordering a new batch. Ordered 12 sets, now all gone.
  9. Hi there, I know a lot of wiper stuff has been covered at length, but I was curious about how to seamlessly integrate a Honda motor into the stock Z and wanted to understand the wiring circuit entirely. One little tidbit has been missed in a lot of this stuff. From looking at the diagrams, what is interesting is that when the wipers are set to off, the polarity to the wiper motor is reversed. It then operates for a short time in reverse to fully park the wipers. It does this due to a little fact that the wipers will actually go lower when the motor is ran in reverse. I found this out on Zclub.net. Heres' the quoted tidbit: (reference: http://zclub.net/forum/showpost.php?s=7082a089822ad1081635656e790cb302&p=210942&postcount=9). Final parking of the wiper arms. This is the clever bit which took me a while to work out. When the wipers are switched off the DC motor reverses it’s direction due to circuitry controlled by a relay strapped on to the side of the motor (this relay is used at other times too in the wiper operation). The linkage is attached to the motor via a short arm an eccentric cam bearing and coil spring. During normal operation the eccentric cam is in a position which has the effect of shortening the linkage, when the motor reverses the coil spring tightens due to the direction of travel, grips the eccentric cam, rotates it through 180’ and lengthens the linkage thus parking the wipers lower down the screen – clever eh? That’s why when switching to the off position the wiper always does a wipe – it’s to ‘park’ the wipers low down the screen. Now the problem is that on most cars (your’s? mine was) this coil spring will be broken and so the wipers will not park fully! If you position the wiper to park low down then this will become part of it’s normal sweep and so the other end of the sweep will be short! On the internet sites I’ve looked at nobody understands the purpose of this broken spring and because the wipers work with it broken it’s overlooked. While I haven't inspected my spring yet, I will do so soon as well as check if it does indeed park lower. But now came the thought about whether I should upgrade to the Honda motor or not. My wipers work fine albeit a little slowly. I feel now I'd rather have a little slow working wiper, but have them park lower. I feel if I use the Honda motor, it would be guess work if the park lobes (internal contacts) are setup the same to allow the reverse park to happen. But since I fully understand the circuit now, I figured I'd throw in a definitive answer on the best way to use the 260z or 280z with the intermittent function (as well as park, and low and high). This diagram I found on here is correct for the hookup: It's from a 76' 280z. Not my diagram, but kudos to BackDoorZ on here. Here's the Wiper FSM from 74 260z: This diagram is annoyingly hard to follow since they label the wires by function instead of color. The 6 wires going into the motor in the diagram and their respective colors are: B (Battery?) - Blue/Red P (Park?) - Yellow 2 (?) - Blue/White (Yellow/Green on 77-78 280z) E (earth) - Black H (High) - Blue/Yellow L (Low) - Blue - (Yellow/Blue on 77-78 280z) As a helper I believe the S and M switch is the internal lobe contacts in the stock wiper motor. S possibly meaning "stopped" and M "moving". Some notes: The middle part of the switch shows that if the switch is in 'int'/low/high, then it sends ground down the 2 wire. This energizes a relay in the wiper motor that sets the polarity so that it's 12v on top and then gets ground for either the low or high speed windings out the bottom. Tricky part is that if you switch to the off position mid stroke, then the power to the relay is cut mid stroke, so how does it keep 12v on the top of the motor. Well, when it's mid stroke, the S/M wiper will be on M and connect ground to the P wire. But it also lets current flow throw the diode to ground (in the wiper motor) keeping that relay energized till the stroke is done. So now it's finished it's default power stroke. When it gets back to the S wiper, it will invert the power to the top of the motor (you can see the top of the motor connected directly to E (earth). If you Trace the L wire back through, you can it goes back through 3, then into the box, then out P and ultimately connects back to 12v causing the motor to turn in reverse for a given period. I take it the specific phasing and size of the low will determine how much it actually rotates back. Here's the Honda (1997 accord, though I believe all the colors are the same): Putting these 2 together is a little tricky, but let me explain why BackDoorZ's diagram above works. He notes in his post that the Blue/white wire is never hooked up to anything. This is because it's sole purpose is to invert the power to the stock motor. The obvious: Honda - datsun - function Green/black - blue/red - this is constant 12v power. Basically always send power to one side of the motor. Black - black - this is always ground Blue - Blue - low speed wire. blue/yellow - blue/yellow - high speed wire. Honda's blue/white wire basically outputs 12v when the wiper is parked, and it outputs ground when it's mid stroke. By hooking this up to the yellow wire you get the intermittent and park to work. Looking at the 'int' diagram for the datsun, observe the 2 pole to the left of the capacitors (C1, C2). When the intermittent box actuates, it basically connects ground (E) up to M, which if you trace it back through connects to the low speed side. It probably only does this for a short moment, but enough to get the wiper into motion. But when the int box kicks off, it basically connects the low speed wire up to the P (the Yellow wire). Connecting this to the honda blue/white wire assures that you will again provide ground to the low speed wire till the wiper parks. I know that is really wordy, but the OCD in me wanted to get all these diagrams out there for those to see why it works or to troubleshoot issues. Can help with understanding why your stock circuit is acting up as well. ps. if you want to understand how the pie piece works on the honda diagram, assume the large part of the pie rotates and it is ground, the left small pie piece is 12v and is stationary, and the middle contact connects rides on whichever one is below it.
  10. mtnickel

    Z31T axle swap CAN fit

    Hi guys, Just thought I'd finally post some of my findings here since this is ultimately the place where I learned everything there is to know about technical aspects of the Z-car. So i present, the making of a z31 adapter. I realize this has definitely been done before and I'm not claiming to be the originator, but I never saw any measurements, or calculations and started from scratch instead. The following may not flow very well as most of it is from the instruction guide I made, but I tried to quickly edit as best I could. Background So there’s been a lot of information going back and forth about whether Z31 turbo axles will fit in the S30 chassis. Companion flanges, cage flipping, and then even custom shorter axles to be swapped in…which work, which don’t? Do the axles bind? etc. I’m trying to dispel at least some of the rumors/hearsay. Here is what I’ve found on my early 260z (I haven’t measured on 240z, or 280z, but I have a suspicion that the pickup points and axle clearances are all the same). Stock Axles compared to Z31T I took a measurement of the length of the stock axles while on the car at ride height. I then compared that side by side to stock Z31T axles. It was quickly apparent that it was going to be very close. The driverside looked to have some room, but the passenger side was as long as the axle if not just slightly longer. Driverside: Passenger side (centering lip is very close...hard to tell from pic). The Adapter Requirements Once I saw these measurements, I knew that if Z31T axles were to work, the companion adapter needed to be as far out as possible. Hence we aimed to make the adapter so that it is flush with the stock outboard flange. Here's how it turned out: Test Fitting With the adapters welded up, we then threw them on the car to check fitment. The axles are actually at their tightest point in full droop. Many have stated that when the axles get parallel/straight, they are longest and can bind, thus changing spring rate, wearing diff bearings, etc. They absolutely are not tightest there. I took the springs out, fitted everything up and during testing binding occurred in the lowest 1-2” of travel. Moving the hub upwards resulted in more clearance. I believe this is due to 1 of 2 reasons The axle and control arm are not parallel. I think closer to full droop, the control arm is pulling the hub closer to the diff at a faster rate than axle is. (in picture, all lines are the same and the distance between the 2 line end points (simulating lower arm and axle) is kept the same. The dotted line is aprox where the strut might be. So at full droop, the strut pulls in faster and leaves more of the axle out to bind against the strut) When the axle is parallel, the cage ends are also square, but as they get more angular, the axle may actually get slightly longer. It’s the same reason when the box below couldn’t be removed between 2 fixed walls without it becoming longer first. Comparing the fit on both sides, we find the passenger side is the tighter fitting axle. With the OEMZ31T axles, technically the driverside would be ok without flipping the cage, but you may as well flip the cage since you’re having to do the passenger side anyways. The passenger side OEM axle binds up during the lower 2” of droop. It binds so much so that you can’t even get the axle in when the car is jacked up. Flipping the cage gave enough clearance to both get the axle in and have a little give. Once closer to ride height, the clearance increases further and even at full compression there is lots of clearance. ROCK AUTO axles: These axles use the tripod design of the 280zx Turbo axle I believe (or maybe NA 300zx as well, don’t quote me on this. All I know is its not the same design as the OEM Turbo Z31 axles. Because it’s a different design, there are actually no cages to flip, so nothing can be done to these axles to make them shorter. Thankfully they fit as is and are just that little bit shorter than the OEM axles. So, Don’t bother popping the grease cap, as you’ll just find nothing to flip. Cage Flipping Details The cage flipping saves about 3.5mm of clearance (a little over 1/8”) no more.See the space between the cage and the axle end. This is the total amount of clearance we gain. After the cage is flipped, the axle end becomes the longest point. 1) Put your axle in a vise. 2) Grab the cv end and raise and lower effectively hammering the cage into the grease cap. You don’t pry the cap out with tools, but rather use the internals of the axle to pop it out. Use care here, as the first one I did shot the cap off spraying grease all over my friend. Haha. 3) Slide the outer cv cage down as far as you can. Mine inverted the seal a bit and stayed down there. You want to have access to the cage and balls. 4) I taped up the CV to ensure that while I was wrestling to remove it, the balls wouldn’t go flying into the dirt and grime on my floor. In hindsight however, the balls are a fairly tight fit and won't come out without a little persuasion. I found that out when I ended up rebuilding the whole axle as I didn't like the consistency of the grease and realized I shouldn't have mixed so much redline synthetic grease with the stock stuff. Probably for the best. 5) Take off the C-clip 6) Slide the entire cage off the axle. It may be a little stuck, so do what you can to pop it off (small plastic mallet, etc). 7) Turn the cage assembly around, and reinstall…should look like picture on the right. (I also ground the axle down, but this is not needed and you risk ruining the hardened temper if you don’t do it slow). 😎 You may at this point repack the unit with grease (compatible) as best you can. I ended up grinding the end of the axle a little as I wasn't sure how much room I would need. Not necessary however and perhaps can risk ruining the surface hardening of the splines if you're not careful. Rockauto axles are a lot thinner too: Grinding Stub Axle For the low profile adapter to provide all the clearance we need, you actually need to grind the stock stub axle down a little. See the nub sticking out from the flange? It would dig into our grease cap if we didn’t grind it off, so grind it down till it’s flush with the flange (use a straightedge to check for high points). There should be plenty of the staked portion of the nut still to keep that nut tight. Flange Welding and Preparation We ran into an issue after welding up our first set of adapters; the square flange on the Datsun hub is actually not very concentric. That is, the square doesn’t run true to the center of the axle assembly. Therefore if you just slip the adapter onto the square flange as best you can and go from there you may end up with it rotating on a ‘wobble’. I think we had something like 0.040" of runout by centering the adapter on the square portion of the flange. So it takes a little time and thought to make the flange concentric with the rotational axis. A dial gauge is ideal, but you could get it pretty close if you're good with some calipers: The stock centering hole can be pretty rough so it's tough to get it dead nuts. Plus when you tack it can pull the flange to one side. I recommend to shim it with paper or even shim stock if you have it, prior to tacking. Also, if you tack with the 309, it has enough give that you can give it a few whacks with the hammer to shift it a few thou one way or another. We ended up making a few more sets and didn't like all the fiddling, so we made a cool jig that locates the flange on both the stock axle ring and the new flange ring. Plus it bolts down to keep it flat to avoid warping. I could probably rent this thing out to anyone doing the job provided the leave a deposit and pay for shipping and such: Welding The machinist friend who made these with me said if we are going to sell any of these things, people gotta Tig weld them. Whether or not that's essential, I don't know, but I'll take his advice. It at least assures the welder has some experience and will know how to handle welding to cast. (remember the stock companion flange is from a cast piece). He said to use 309 filler. After all is said and done, these axles can be used without worry. I'm not sure how deep the MM flanges are or any others for that matter, but I do know its a pretty tight fit even with grinding the stub and flipping the cage. Although more clearance is had when the car rests on it's weight, so success can vary. Here's a few more shots of when we made both the first set and a bigger batch. To machine the backside, we cut the profile into those blank set of aluminum jaws. Here's the test fit on the driverside with the cage flipped and the axle slightly ground down. You can see from the amount of clearance, I didn't need to grind the axle down: Here's additional shot of one customer who had old school guy MIG weld it. If you can mig like this, pre-heat and avoid cracks, keep the flange centered, and keep it flat (bolted down), then it would probably work too: Sorry this is such a jumble of info...hope some find it useful. Happy to answer any questions. Cheers, Mark
  11. mtnickel

    Z31T axle swap CAN fit

    Messaged. Let me know. Previous user waiting to ship. You’re next.
  12. mtnickel

    Z31T axle swap CAN fit

    We’ll have to figure out whether it’s the SS axles or some other discrepancy maybe between 240 and 280 models. One thing I overlooked is that my rear struts are sectioned about 1”, so my “full droop” may not be as long as others. But I thought the 260/280z sat higher with a bigger isolator which would somewhat negate that. I’ll see how other regular nonVlsd guys fare. So far no other complaints. Thanks for the post!
  13. mtnickel

    Z31T axle swap CAN fit

    I believe I had a FS post started if you search the classifieds. They are available
  14. mtnickel

    What about EFR 7064? Its one sale...

    So you run the 6258 on the L28ET? i'm debating between the 6758 and 7163 on my RB25. From the numbers, it looks like the 6758 can get me pretty close to my 370whp goal (little over 425 hp). Plus it will spool quicker than the 7163, however it will probably be a power band that dies off in the higher RPM. Additionally, there is something to be said about turbine efficiency...the 7163 will probably make more power at a better pressure ratio with less back pressure. Decisions decisions.
  15. mtnickel

    VOLVO 850 FAN INSTALL

    I ran the same Volvo Fan. Built a shroud from fibreglass...sort of a fun project. If you can find a parts volvo, The relay system on it is very robust; comes with nice connectors already and also provision for high and low speed fan control.
  16. mtnickel

    Which CV kits are best for an R200 240Z?

    Ya, weld on adapters aren’t an ideal solution, and we are at the mercy of stock stubs. But all in all, it was the cheapest decent solution I could come up with. Newzed With my adapters, it’s still a close fit at full droop and I would recommend flipping the cages. But that only takes about 10 minutes to do. Saves the 3.5 odd mm. And they are maybe a little more outboard of Joe’s since they even require to grind the stub axle down a shade. Joe may have been able to make his even more outward provided you could trim more of the stub off. You’d lose the staked portion, but the newer ZX nut is a locking nut that would alleviate it.
  17. mtnickel

    Which CV kits are best for an R200 240Z?

    Great questions. We found out the hard way that the square flange isn’t concentric. It’s a rough cast and can be off almost 1mm. The z31t axle centers on the locating ring of the adapter. The adapter sits flat to the machined face of the stock flange. That takes care of 2 orientations. To weld the adapter on correctly we made the square a touch small. That way you can strategically grind the edges of your square flange to be equal from the Center locating ring. We recommend using a dial indicator to verify you get it reasonably close. If it’s a little big, you can use feeler gauges, shim stock, or even paper as stock to shim it true before tacking. Or you can rent the jig we made to locate it. Haha both options shown in pics
  18. mtnickel

    Which CV kits are best for an R200 240Z?

    Here’s what our slim welded adapter looks like. Basically converts the stock flange to a larger one. Stock z31t axles fit like this. 4 fasteners a side = winning.
  19. mtnickel

    Which CV kits are best for an R200 240Z?

    If you're resourceful enough to find some original Z31T axles, I still believe that's the nicest swap. The main benefit is that there are no fasteners on the diff end...the axle plugs right into the diff. It's just a matter of getting a companion flange on the outboard side to bolt it in. I'm biased perhaps as I sell weld on adapters...but adapters are $195, used Z31T cv's will run you 250-280, and welding the adapter in probably another $100 if you can't do it. So $550 all in. They are known to be very strong too. See my post in the Drivetrain section. Encouraging that Z garage has made a better set. I don't see how theirs don't have adapters though? Still looks like 930 style with adapter...maybe they weld them? I bought the wolf creek setup first hoping it was just a bolt it, but like Z garage found, the CV's they use are terribly sloppy. I then bought true Porsche 930 CV's, but the idea of 20 fasters for axles didn't appeal to me, so I figured out the Z31T setup.
  20. You could weld em shut if you want. To machine that would make them thicker and add a lot of machine time. For cosmetic reasons only.
  21. mtnickel

    Electric Power Steering Information Compiled

    Much appreciated for this info! I have been mulling this swap over. I think i can live without (or rather maybe not live) the collapsable column and plan on a simple install. Due to size and ease of availability, I was going to try the Yaris non-abs with VSS signal. First I may try just using a pulse generator to vary the VSS signal to see if i can find a static point that works well...or alternatively, I've bought a GPS speed sensor on ebay and will try to run that (may need to scale the speed up or down with either an arduino or 555 timer or something). My only fear is the load with 205 sticky tires and a heavy turbo engine swap. But anything is better than nothing. Look forward to the updates!
  22. I’d be interested in one of these. I also commend you on your ambition. As has been mentioned however, is that I think the welding and working with the welder, planning assembly and order of welds will be key. Have to remember this will be HOURS of welding. Plus machining both flanges. It’s a lot of work. Hard to keep cost down. The CX racing one is even $600us and they hardly pay for labour. Haha
  23. mtnickel

    Ford Super 8.8 irs swap thread. Rear brakes too

    All in the name of weight and cost savings. Heck, my 93 and 97 accords had double wishbone front and rear!
  24. mtnickel

    Ford Super 8.8 irs swap thread. Rear brakes too

    Ya, it’s all a bit of a mess. The original poster does seem to have a pretty good handle on it I gather. The inner pivots needing to match only holds true when the spindle is held static. But like he said, since the tie rod moved outboard it’s ok that the inner pivot moves as well since our main goal is to have the control arm and tie rod be parallel and roughly the same length. Exciting stuff. If I wasn’t so deep into my setup, I’d be exploring this a whole lot. Brake, suspension, cheap and readily accessible beefy diffs. Lots of pluses.
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