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toolman

Heavy Duty frame rails and connectors

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Now that the underside of the 240z is painted with single stage polyurethane paint. the car could be removed from the rotisserie.

I decided to construct a wooden  dolly so the car could be move around the garage easily.

IMG_4698.thumb.JPG.037cddc6200244d81f3e3ac2c531accc.JPGused 2"x 6" planks and 3/4" plywood sheets to construct the dolly.

The four metal 3" casters that were tack welded to the frame rails were reused and bolts to the 2" x 6" planks.

IMG_4700.thumb.JPG.c70d89fd3ff6f4506c7d3d567990dc6e.JPGTwo 1"x 3" wood strips were screwed to the top of the dolly to prevent the car from

slipping off the dolly.   They run parallel outside of the frame rails.

 

The car was removed from the  rotisserie and place on the dolly.

IMG_4797.thumb.JPG.d4f512fbc756f7cc09d482ac8067e6a0.JPG

 

There were a few small parts that missed being epoxy primed so I started to work on them.  The two front bumper panels were  inspected.

Only the right side had corrosion problems.

IMG_4807.thumb.JPG.263b128da8a7216abfc446ac72ed9210.JPGRight panel had two rusted out sections.

A paper template is created to the replacement section.

 

Another template was made to repair the other section of the bumper panel.

IMG_4812.thumb.JPG.9d5636569e2f194d9efccd71c36776a7.JPGThe template was traced on to make a sheet metal patch.

 

IMG_4818.thumb.JPG.0c3b5ce2540acc3e3ce5158698c26636.JPGInside view of the mig welds expoxied to

prevent corrosion.

IMG_4814.thumb.JPG.eb8f45469a8994671a83613371d51257.JPGOutside view of bumper panel epoxied

and will smooth over with body filler after epoxy primed.

 

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That shell is probably nicer than the day it rolled off the production line....very nice work!  (Actually WAY nicer, with all the additional rust protection you've incorporated.)

Edited by jhm

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View of the front lower bumper panels primed by poly primer.

IMG_4842.thumb.JPG.7da3029edc11f5147481587cfcfe4697.JPG

The bigger job was turned out to be the amber turn signal lens.  Some of those tiny phillip screws(about 3mm) were rusted and had to be drilled

out. 

Pic of broken lens mounting screws.

IMG_4829.thumb.JPG.8e1a94fe1938a158748c48bab15d7d52.JPG

 

At first, I used gray JB WELD expoxy to repair those lens mounting plastic studs.  Then upon putting the lens cover on the housing, the gray

epoxy created dark shallows in the lens.    So I removed the gray epoxy and used

JB WELD Clear Epoxy was utilized to eliminate this problem.

IMG_4856.thumb.JPG.02b534a123e3cc2da4b5fe1d5eda1b57.JPGThe epoxy was dry to touch in a hour but waited till next day to drill and tap them.

 

Those amber studs were recreated by using plastic straws and masking tape to make a mold for the epoxy.  The straws were slit to go around

the existing studs.   Masking tape was applied tightly to seal and hold the mold while curing.   Phillips 4-40 screws was found to be close enough to

replace the rusted ones.

IMG_4858.thumb.JPG.8592e3a3a9655a2e2357a9f55db36648.JPG

 

The finished product

IMG_4859.thumb.JPG.727be6df6c2e201bbb0effc4a59b9c03.JPG

 

 

 

Edited by toolman
text correction

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While I was waiting for some parts to come in, I decided to work on the two front headlight buckets.  

A view of the back of the buckets.   The right bucket is the "before cleaning" and the left is "after the cleaning".

 

 

The right bucket shows the "Before cleaning" an

On ‎1‎/‎8‎/‎2019 at 7:41 PM, toolman said:

View of the front lower bumper panels primed by poly primer.

IMG_4842.thumb.JPG.7da3029edc11f5147481587cfcfe4697.JPG

The bigger job was turned out to be the amber turn signal lens.  Some of those tiny phillip screws(about 3mm) were rusted and had to be drilled

out. 

Pic of broken lens mounting screws.

IMG_4829.thumb.JPG.8e1a94fe1938a158748c48bab15d7d52.JPG

 

At first, I used gray JB WELD expoxy to repair those lens mounting plastic studs.  Then upon putting the lens cover on the housing, the gray

epoxy created dark shallows in the lens.    So I removed the gray epoxy and used

JB WELD Clear Epoxy was utilized to eliminate this problem.

IMG_4856.thumb.JPG.02b534a123e3cc2da4b5fe1d5eda1b57.JPGThe epoxy was dry to touch in a hour but waited till next day to drill and tap them.

 

Those amber studs were recreated by using plastic straws and masking tape to make a mold for the epoxy.  The straws were slit to go around

the existing studs.   Masking tape was applied tightly to seal and hold the mold while curing.   Phillips 4-40 screws was found to be close enough to

replace the rusted ones.

IMG_4858.thumb.JPG.8592e3a3a9655a2e2357a9f55db36648.JPG

 

The finished product

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by toolman
correction text

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While awaiting some parts to come in, I decided to work on the two front headlight buckets. 

Right bucket is "before cleaning" and left is "after cleaning"

IMG_4863.thumb.JPG.467e367a7a75cdd3ba3a3bb5a6ef3036.JPG

 

The right bucket is "before cleaning" and left one is "after cleaning".

IMG_4864.thumb.JPG.30e9977e02eaff4eb6cd38c3d4134613.JPG

 

This pic shows both head light buckets with light mounting cups.

 

IMG_4867.thumb.JPG.aea9d992b1a723a9f6754bb81cd45e33.JPG  

I was thinking of restoring these buckets with zinc chromate( yellowish gold plating)  But found the zinc chromate is very toxic and hard to

dispose of.   So I am thinking of trying using metallic gold powder coating to recreate the coating.   Checking to see if I can match the color.

I ordered an Eastwood Powder Coating kit but it is on back order till February.    So I went to work on the disassembly of the rear suspension.

Of coarse, the most difficult part is the removal of the spindle pins.  In our tropical climate here, I knew those pins would not slide easily.   As

I didn't want to spend $100 for the puller + freight, I decided to fabricate one.  Went to Home Depot to gather all the parts.

   First, I migwelded  a used wheel lug nut (12mm X1.25) to my 5/8" NC X14" threaded rod for the pulling screw.

IMG_4872.thumb.JPG.a458d4644181af48a12181d58ae678f7.JPG

IMG_4873.thumb.JPG.1de47560e70ceb0a868842be6128af01.JPGtotal view of 14" pulling screw

Used a 1" ID steel fence post about 12" with 5/8" steel washer welded to one end of the pipe.

aaaIMG_4892.thumb.JPG.9acef010267825749571693fe50d1c5a.JPG Note: the spindle pin shaft is on the top then the threaded pulling shaft then the pipe housing on the bottom.  The threaded rod was screwed securely to the threaded end of the spindle pin.  The round housing was installed over the tjhreaded screw.  Then two additional  5/8" flat washers with grease between them was added to provide slippage under tension( a small bearing

can be used too).  Then the pulling nut is added.

A 1/2 ratchet or 15/16" box wrench can used to turn down the pulling nut.   For additional torque, a wrench extender or a long pipe can be utilized.   Also, heating with a torch the cast iron area around the spindle locking pin will loose the corrosion

if it is really stuck.

IMG_4870.JPG

Another important thing to make removal easier is the use of penetrating oil.  After removing the two nuts and washers on both ends of the spindle pin, Place the suspension assembly so the pin is vertical as possible.   Soak the top and between all

cracks to get the penetrating oil in as possible.   I seen mechanics make a cup around the top of spindle to

create a reservoir to hold the oil.  Leave the oil on as long as possible( even a week if necessary).   The more oil that gets in,

the easier the job will be.   It will take a long time to turn that nut to pull out that 11" spindle pin considering one rotation of the nut probably moves the pin about 1/16" to 1/8" out.   It will seem that way.

The cost of the parts was about $20.

 

Edited by toolman
text correction

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Looking awesome, I am building a street car..... almost ready to level the car out to start the front frames. Still want to finish the drivers dog leg this week, should be done tonight.

 

You sound like your having back problems like me..... I am working through the pain. was doing therapy 3 times a week. Took 5 weeks off.

 

Jeff

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My dashboard  was in bad shape as most of its early life( 71 to 83) it was parked outside all the time.  This picture shows the dashboard broke into eight pieces when it fell on the work bench.

1490359436_IMG_5040(2).thumb.JPG.f6cce1851180a40c3b39c2a1c0418e5d.JPGNote-Huge cracks through out the dash board

 

So first thing to do was to sandblast the small amount of corrosion of the frame of the dash.

IMG_4900.thumb.JPG.298c874c095964fe637d7506c2f746ac.JPGMy Speed Blaster does a good blasting job on objects too big to fit in my sandblasting cabinet.

 

Motorsport supplied the replacement dash cap for $120 but the old  dash foam was so bad it would just crumble in your hands.   So I decide to replace the dash foam.  I decided to use the Motorsport dash cap and the existing dash frame as a mold.   Then new foam would poured or injected into this mold.   

So now I had to seal off the metal part of the dash to be a part of the mold.   Black shipping sheeting was utilized to wrap the dash.   3M General Spray Adhesive would sprayed on the frame to hold the sheeting in place.     The biggest problem was the Motorsport replacement dash cap did not cover the lower section of the dash board.  Four major molds would have to be created to fill in these areas.   Using card board and duct tape were used to make the molds.   The inside of the card board would be covered with the black sheeting to provide easy removal from the mold.  There were some of the original dash sections that could be reused for this purpose

View of the Right lower section of dash

IMG_5021.thumb.JPG.6ea8f1306e6022a4873b22acd5b0c0e6.JPGThis corner section was sectioned off the original dash then epoxied to the replacement cap.

The other part of this patch

IMG_5023.thumb.JPG.58ccbd3c64532208571d6ba4010e8958.JPG.

Center panel mold outside view

IMG_5017.thumb.JPG.3444ff48a66a3f773959c931445d9afd.JPGNote=Black sheeting inside of the mold

The outside view of the mold

IMG_5024.thumb.JPG.76ab0c2e21f74cdff31f0a989e0688b4.JPGA lot of Duct Tape created a sturdy mold.

The left side mold was constructed the same way

1940848023_IMG_5005(1).thumb.JPG.5aa48bec2f2fd94f8a008c2c716ac239.JPGNote -Bottom of the mold was open otherwise the foam pressure would distort or damage it.

 

574174700_IMG_5008(1).thumb.JPG.6a9cc04ae2ad89cf42421e0f716745ed.JPGThis view shows the mold attached to the replacement dash cap with duct tape.

IMG_5026.thumb.JPG.4d58e7c98fb634f7c909c34a8d89ec01.JPGThis pic of the Right side lower section of the dash

Edited by toolman
add text

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My dashboard  was in bad shape as most of its early life( 71 to 83) it was parked outside all the time.  This picture shows the dashboard broke into eight pieces when it fell off the work bench.

1490359436_IMG_5040(2).thumb.JPG.f6cce1851180a40c3b39c2a1c0418e5d.JPGNote-Huge cracks through out the dash board

 

So first thing to do was to sandblast the small amount of corrosion of the frame of the dash.

IMG_4900.thumb.JPG.298c874c095964fe637d7506c2f746ac.JPGMy Speed Blaster does a good blasting job on objects to bigger to fit in my sandblasting cabinet.

 

Motorsport supplied the replacement dash cap for $120 as the old dash foam was so bad it would just crumble in your hands.   So I decide to replace the dash foam with  new stuff.  So I decide to use the Motorsport dash cap and the existing dash frame as a mold.   Then new foam would poured or injected into this mold.   

So now I had to seal off the metal part of the dash to be a part of the mold.   Black shipping sheeting was utilized to wrap the dash.   3M General Spray Adhesive would sprayed on the hold the sheeting in place.

   The biggest problems was the Motorsport replacement dash cap did not cover the lower section of the dash board.  Four major molds would have to be created to fill in these areas.   Using card board and duct tape were used in this process.   The inside of the card board would be covered with the black sheeting to provide easy removal from the mold.  There were some of the original dash sections that could be reused.

View of the Right lower section of dash

IMG_5021.thumb.JPG.6ea8f1306e6022a4873b22acd5b0c0e6.JPGThis corner section was sectioned off the original dash then epoxied to the replacement cap.

The other part of this patch

IMG_5023.thumb.JPG.58ccbd3c64532208571d6ba4010e8958.JPG.

Center panel mold outside view

IMG_5017.thumb.JPG.3444ff48a66a3f773959c931445d9afd.JPGNote=Black sheeting inside of the mold

The outside view of the mold

IMG_5024.thumb.JPG.76ab0c2e21f74cdff31f0a989e0688b4.JPGA lot of Duct Tape created a sturdy mold.

The left side mold was constructed the same way

1940848023_IMG_5005(1).thumb.JPG.5aa48bec2f2fd94f8a008c2c716ac239.JPGNote -Bottom of the mold was left open otherwise the foam pressure would distort or damage it.

 

574174700_IMG_5008(1).thumb.JPG.6a9cc04ae2ad89cf42421e0f716745ed.JPGThis view shows the mold attached to the replacement dash cap with duct tape.

IMG_5026.thumb.JPG.4d58e7c98fb634f7c909c34a8d89ec01.JPGThis pic of the Right side lower section of the dash

Edited by toolman

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Four 1/4" holes were drilled in the dash to provide inspection ports in areas to check on foam movement.

IMG_5028.thumb.JPG.2217b6070f3202c7e6c7282de1590425.JPGThe lower hole shows the foam coming through the dash.

The foam temperature was also monitored with a Infrared thermometer.

1668696906_IMG_5038(1).thumb.JPG.f2de7055b6481f701c939f638b0874ae.JPGInside  section being epoxied together using vise grips.

 

Locktite Tite Foam is a foam which expands a lot and should work perfectly for this project.   Make sure to wear gloves and safety googles.  This stuff is really sticky!!  So

keep lacquer thinner or acetone nearby to clean up with.  The flexible nozzle helps to get into confined areas.

1467716424_IMG_5037(1).thumb.JPG.03fd818be621aa4e97c2c09edb43ba12.JPGPurchased from Home Depot for about $5 a can.

 

There are several places to check dash cap alignment before foaming.

184630361_IMG_4996(1).thumb.JPG.2f072bec78df12e3fc5d44f29350f80f.JPGCheck gap and height alignment here.

 

Another point of alignment is the glove compartment lock hole.

857838726_IMG_5047(1).thumb.JPG.f11f5dd1de52e22d7246c92552255da7.JPG

 

 

Crumbled paper wrapped with black plastic sheeting was used to plugged gauges, speedometer and tach openings.

 

IMG_5011 (1).JPG

Now the foaming can begin.  I started with the top area of the dash as it is the most visible and the most likely to deform.

IMG_5051.thumb.JPG.7b645224fcacda5770c2d0a342278989.JPGNote-Allow time for foam to expand before spraying more.

It will expand more than you expect especially this Locktite Tite Foam.

377500630_IMG_5060(1).thumb.JPG.7d1abc70f32f5953b6923bfcb354537f.JPG

IMG_5076.thumb.JPG.7af54941c3611c6ec400d87b1edbba3d.JPGLooks like a snow blizzard.

IMG_5078.thumb.JPG.a745c608703baf8d35eceb645721f734.JPGTop view of dash

 

Have to wait 24 hours for the foam to fully cure before cutting away.   Probably be using a Dremel, utility knife and razor blades to cut excess foam all.

.

 

Edited by toolman
corrections

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Thanks for the kind words.   I found that an old hacksaw blade with fine teeth worked well at cutting the excess foam away.

IMG_5106.thumb.JPG.64b476da7b305ae1ff120c9818317429.JPGNote-The smooth cut of the foam.

 

This is my Rubbish Box for just this dash board project,

IMG_5112.thumb.JPG.22bb10b01b24167076ef593f88d33fe9.JPG

 

After trimming the excess foam from the front edge of the dash, the molding is installed to check the alignment.

IMG_5088.thumb.JPG.7aeeabf438a0828ab699a6a3d6803905.JPG

 

The bottom mold on the glove box was not strong enough to hold the foam so I made a stronger design.

IMG_5089.thumb.JPG.720fb4b883ad30a1294a8a8d46af2673.JPG  IMG_5090.thumb.JPG.a489755b898fced340fe341a0ac52c7d.JPG The wooden block added the extra support to the mold,

 

Vise grips were used to hold the mold to the dash while welding.

IMG_5103.thumb.JPG.280226831a7dd762cdef242ff45cf5f6.JPG

 

The Center dash panel was test fitted into the dash,

IMG_5099.thumb.JPG.44859d2cddd047567220cc419e422cf5.JPG

 

Mold #5 was created to replace the foam section below the glove compartment.

IMG_5109.thumb.JPG.583b829e3e16dc175ee5f7e8b6448116.JPG  IMG_5118.thumb.JPG.4f92edd12a0f8a7530bad70c07db6baa.JPG   After removal from mold and trimmed.

 

IMG_5119.thumb.JPG.5ee4425d95683b0213e92356fef4938d.JPGNote-Its thinness and dfferent thickness of both longsides.

 

Bottom view of the glove compartment side of dash.

IMG_5114.thumb.JPG.4127660dcec45d01574d266f21c6ed9b.JPG

 

Center bottom view of the dash.

IMG_5115.thumb.JPG.df1133fb3dca193bba91d589d60e0850.JPG

 

Bottom view of the Speedometer side of the dash.

IMG_5116.thumb.JPG.962a57b511ad1fbbe6d1d291dffec656.JPG   IMG_5113.thumb.JPG.efb117f18c00719dbf6cc76c2f3f39a6.JPGFront view of Speedometer side of dash

While waiting for the form to cure, I constructed a replacement glove compartment box out .060 aluminum sheet;

IMG_5110.thumb.JPG.edfb022173a21118f78082c944fa11d4.JPG    IMG_5111.thumb.JPG.8e6d193d4469f0e20aae530eb79a2783.JPG

                                   side view                                                                                                                                 front view

 

The replacement Glove Box was not replicated as I felt aluminum would better suited than a cardboard one.   The sides of the box have not been installed as I am planning to line a gray Velour material on the inside of the box.   Putting the fabric first without the sides on will make the job easier.

    All of the exterior foam sections will probably be coated with Fiberglass Finishing Resin to give them more strength.   Then, the dash will painted with a textured Dash Black paint so the glove compartment door will match the rest of the dash board.

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by toolman
corrections

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  I was going to use Fiberglass Resin over the foam but decided to use Epoxy Resin instead.   The reason being fiberglass resin would not adhere the dash plastic material.

IMG_5123.thumb.JPG.b610a8db0878275882c0466fa50d1bcf.JPGAlso, Epoxy Resin is much stronger than Fiberglass resin

 

View of Left side of dash with Epoxy Resin applied on foam.

IMG_5124.thumb.JPG.835e12689ea710cda9ae14c8d067e41c.JPG

 

Same section after Body Filler finish sanded.

IMG_5125.thumb.JPG.5afb4a024fda0c5abec49a354d69359d.JPG

 

Bottom view of dash after finish filler sanding.

IMG_5126.thumb.JPG.d37109be7f5b1680f4533b4d689e82ff.JPGNote-Blending areas between replacement foam section and original dash are smooth.

Center view of dash bottom after finish filler sanding.

IMG_5127.thumb.JPG.7eaa1d90c11a968deff46366ac1f70f0.JPG

 

Bottom view of Right side of dash.

IMG_5128.thumb.JPG.cc636c6d5dadc529dfe7c51a9d709cf6.JPGAll of the repaired areas were next epoxy primed.

 

Black Trim/Bumper paint and Sem Products Texture Coatings were both used to finish paint the dash.

The entire dashboard were painted with the Black Trim paint to create a even color base.

IMG_5140.thumb.JPG.2b706d197cbd9e9e18e668c544923109.JPG

Then the Texture Coating was utilized to create a textured surface for the repaired areas.  This texture can be controlled by adjusting spraying distance and speed of

spraying. 

  After allowing the paint to cure overnight. I sanded the whole dash with 3M Fine Grit Gray Fiber pads,   The texture is also controlled by the amount of material sanded off to

match the original texture as possible.

  This is a picture of the original dash cover for those of you who came to this post late.  The whole dashboard was in about 10 separate pieces.

IMG_5144.thumb.JPG.193eca035a63400c3c67f89bdf6229a0.JPG

 

View of the repaired dashboard after a month of work.

IMG_5145.thumb.JPG.2415bee345ce30bfd434748d846dc61c.JPGTop View of Finished Dash Board.

 

IMG_5146.thumb.JPG.0ad0df8dcc62af6cb6ef9e9dc13fb52b.JPGLeft Front View

 

IMG_5099.thumb.JPG.a04c35d8b0830488f29673a739fd941b.JPGCnter View with Center Section and Glove Compartment installed

 

IMG_5148.thumb.JPG.9b37bca1d608dd876f482ad24c275b40.JPGRight Front View

 

IMG_5149.thumb.JPG.dd1d763cae4d586055c374323099617e.JPGCloseup View of Glove Compartment Emblem

I decided the Emblem needed more "POP" so I brushed painted the Emblem with 3 colors-Red, Blue and Silver.

 

Note-The instrument Gauges(Speedometer, Tach and cluster gauges were not installed.   I have not decided on what brand of gauges to use yet.

Am thinking about Speed Hut but still not sure.   I left a lot of space around the gauges in case I decide on larger diameter gauges.  The total

cost of materials is Motorsport Full Dash Cap-$120, 5 can 0f Loctite Foam-$25, one pint of Rigid Foam/Harder-$30, Black Trim Paint-$12 and

Sem Texture Coating-$35=$222.00.

   How is the Replacement Dash Covers from Vantage Dash?    If their price is still about $800 and quality is decent,  it is worth the price.

I still have to finish  the glove compartment box then off to the next challenge-Powder Coating.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

Edited by toolman

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Finished the replacement aluminum glove compartment box.

IMG_5179.thumb.JPG.a10b8f16bdf6f8633999135bb04c949d.JPG

 

Rear side of box

IMG_5180.thumb.JPG.081584525194d60dd9fff9c4b5273b00.JPG

 

Now I went to something that I always wanted to do--Powder Coating.   So I ordered a Eastwood Powder Coating kit for $100.  A cardboard box was

used for the powder spraying booth.  Note there is metal rod in the box to hold parts to be coated and act as the grounding for the unit.

IMG_5183.thumb.JPG.71d441a635d0e7664abda20281c4869c.JPGThe system is low maintenance. Just blow air to clean the gun and bottle.   The booth can be

vacuumed after every color coating.   Spraying the powder has a low learning curve.

 

I would recommend this book before actual powder coating as it has many helpful tips.

IMG_5169.thumb.JPG.3660c73558d796e8afdb3907f21abb05.JPG

 

Pic of the before and after powder coating of the head light buckets.

IMG_5168.thumb.JPG.785614403623df3cd757ce0166e0f4a2.JPGNote-the plastic headlight adjusting screw inserts must be

removed otherwise the oven will melt them.

 

The headlight bucket in my Toaster Oven for 20 minutes at 400 degrees.

IMG_5170.thumb.JPG.0e2a60cad3d505a737af674a120b7762.JPG

 

After baking, the bucket was moved back to the spray booth to cool off.

IMG_5172.thumb.JPG.ed048071c1431b6d845283b8f890780f.JPGNote-The is only the Base Coating and must be followed with a Top Coat to provide the right color.

 

Pic of the headlight assemblies after Base Coating.

IMG_5184.thumb.JPG.f40a0dbffdd6151879d0af33ab316e2b.JPG

 

Picture of hood hinge before spray blasting and powder coating.

1720575725_IMG_5173(1).thumb.JPG.61025029db72c74104614e374a571e9b.JPG

 

Hood hinges after Base Powder Coating.

IMG_5182.thumb.JPG.c87b64ba57ae3023846bf9fbcbfa2520.JPGNote- The original hinge were zinc plated then yellow chromate dipped.  Chromate is a very toxic chemical and hard to

dispose of.   The exact color will be impossible to duplicate with powder coating because it does not allow mixing of powders.

 

However, powder coating of the headlight retaining rings closely resembles chrome plating.

IMG_5208.thumb.JPG.8eee2128ec541eca3ba85756db0f1a1d.JPG

 

Now. I have to wait till the TOP COAT Powders to arrive from the Mainland so I can try to match the Chromate process.   Wish me Luck!

Edited by toolman

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  I found that turning my Toaster Oven on its side provided easier parts mounting.

 

IQWF7561.thumb.JPG.fa5fe965eac71260d7edd31b823d0f21.JPG Also, Lining the rear wall of the oven with aluminum foil raised the curing temperature slightly.

 

I used a long cardboard box with the 2500watt infared light to cure long parts.

IMG_5239.thumb.JPG.c9fa2b6acca74b530382468a9febef2b.JPG  Also, lining the box with aluminum foil help keeping the heat from escaping.

 

The top and side of the box was also covered with Foil.

IMG_5240.thumb.JPG.3a935d09ea0b4d91fd4cae810a2fa59e.JPG

 

The Hood Torsion Spring Rods were slightly longer than my Infrared oven.  So the rods were cured on one side then flipped over to cure the other side.

 

The most difficult part of this powder coating job was trying to match the Chromate plating.   To achieve this. I used Super Chrome as the base powder

coating.   Translucent Gold powder would be used as the Top Coat.    But there are about twenty different variants of the Gold color.   There are also 

many variables in the application of the Top Coat powder.  The number of Top Coats applied over the base Super Chrome will make the color darker with

more coats.  Preheating the part being coating aids in adhesion but changes the color slightly.   The speed of powder spraying  affects the color shade.

The spraying distance from part affects color especially with metallic colors.   I made dozens of metal strips to test the various powder coatings.

 IMG_5340.thumb.JPG.63b999625d60b4f8ee69f337795bf253.JPG A new Rear spindle rod was used for matching purposes.

 

If you used the wrong color, you can strip the powder coating off with Kwik Strip New Paint Remover.   This is not the old Aircraft Paint Remover with the toxic

fumes and really messy.

IMG_5210.thumb.JPG.506c33443adc8eb715fbaddfd4190564.JPGUse paint brush to apply Thick Coats of stripper.

 

IMG_5214.thumb.JPG.060ff5d9d6cf49277f55927ffba5de09.JPGLet the stripper work for 15 minutes and then scrape off

when coating wrinkles.   Then, scrape off using a plastic spreader.   Wear gloves and safety googles when stripping.  I took my gloves to take this photo.  A small

particle of stripper landed just above my glove and it burned like Hell!!   The stripping process was faster than the old Aircraft Remover.   Less Fumes and

a more "Dry" method.

 

After Top Coat Powder Coating, the hand Brake bracket looked that this:

IMG_5346.thumb.JPG.7bec9dc5afecc977f70fd1f0de903f06.JPG Note-The Light Gold coloring

 

The Head Light Housing and Buckets come out like this:

IMG_5338.thumb.JPG.ca0510b6ebbde256df0d75b827a88bb3.JPGNote-Gas Filler Cap housing

 

Hood Hinges

IMG_5345.thumb.JPG.561e41f0635bd17faca44245eaaf27da.JPG Note-The color seems to vary depending on the lighting.

This effect was purposely done to match the Chromate plating as possible.

 

The cost of this Powder Coating of these parts:   Eastwood Powder Coating Gun and accessories was$150 ,  SuperChrome powder was

$25,  Translucent Gold Powder was $27. Kwik Stripper was $12.00,   2500watt Infared light(used) costs $50 =$264 Total       I intend on

power coating a lot more parts( like crossmember,lower control arms, coil springs, etc.    I would recommend powder coating for any 

restoration project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by toolman

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