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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/10/04 in Posts

  1. I want to thank all of you here for giving me inspiration for my build. I have adopted the Hybrid Z name for my build years ago since this site provided a lot of information that I consider priceless. I was able to meet some great people at ZCON, some that know my build and others that just wanted to say hello and compliment me on my build. When I built this car I built it as my version of what a Z should be therefore I know a lot of people were not going to like it since it was my vision and nothing else. Taking my car to ZCON for the 1st time and walking out of there with these awards it’s just incredible, especially with all the awesome cars I was competing against. It’s great to see the judges appreciate all the hard work and effort that has gone into it. These are the awards I received. 1st Place in Ultra Modified Best Engine Gold Cup- This was totally unexpected and shocking it was given to a Z with and LS3 since most of these guys are Nissan purists. Again, thank you all for your support and keeping this site alive.
    3 points
  2. There was some conversation in other topic about blade type rollbar. So, i have one like this. 32x3mm cro-mo tube and 260mm blades. Blades are 35 to 25mm wide and 6mm thick, steel of course. Bar itself is more just a link between blades. This type rollbar works mainly with blades, i.e tube is stiff and blades are flexing (if they do) It depends how they are adjusted. If blade is vertical, it´s very stiff, horizontally they are pretty flexible. Any position between those, are something between, ofc. To adjust, just loose bolt (most left head of blade) and tur to desired position. Or attach cable and make remote control.
    2 points
  3. Hi All It has been a while and I have been racing e36's, TA2's V8's hard. But that Datsun bug bit me again, (It helps to have one sitting in your barn the last 11 years!!!!) Over that time there have been periods I have done several things to it, but campaigning the other cars always meant to revivals short lived. However selling after selling the Sprint race car and just having an endurance car it started to itch. And to be fair I first went on racecarsdirect before I figured that was a stupid waste of money and knowledge. So without too much fuzz... She is back. Here is a link to the original thread: I think it is a blessing in disguise that I haven’t finished it sooner, racing from 10 years means you learn allot on what is smart and what is not. And over the years allot of 'spares' have found their way to the chassis, like a Tilton pedal box, fuel cell etc etc And times change so supplies do to, there a solution for the rear control arms by these guys https://www.apexengineered.com/ So ill put in my order for a front and rear subframe for the car. Here are some pictures of the body as it sits now: First it has been blasted Then powder coated Saturday ill start with mounting some small stuff like the pedal box. For an engine it will run an L28 with forged internals, kameari chain drive, isky cam, worked head, race oil pan and probably ITBS over the set of Dellortos i still have. I might go dry sump but that has pros and cons, the con is it ads weight.
    2 points
  4. Car is still around. Still drysumped LS2, jenvey throttles with quaife 6 speed sequential and independent 9 inch. 18 x 11 wheels and 300 mm slicks all round, big AP brakes. Cool car, but the process over 9 years has been expensive. 3 x R200s, 3 t56 gearbox’s, 3 sets of coil overs, 2 sets of brakes (plus numerous rotors and pads -last set of maintenance rotors and pads was $3400. I motor blown due to oil pressure, one due to a lifter, one cooked, but still ran. Driveline is not bullet proof, but works hard so requires a little maintenance. Video is what I class as a diagnostic video. It also happens to show a Z doing a 2.18 lap around Bathurst. My quaife had dropped one tooth on 3rd gear.
    2 points
  5. For this build I decided to jump in with both feet and learn how to build fiberglass. I found out early on that I would need to build up a custom air dam so I decided to build out a door as a trial to learn the process. I have done plenty of small FG projects but never something large that involves building a mold tool. You can see the process in the pictures. First sanding and waxing the door (plug) and applying mold release. Then a layer of gelcoat and then laying down multiple layers of heavy matt until the mold has enough strength and rigidity not to break when pulling the final part. The only mistake I made was not smoothing out the original door. I thought it looked fairly straight but it turned out to have some waves in it. It also had some small flaws I thought would be easy to correct in the mold. I was dead wrong. It would have been much easier to correct the flaws on the original door than to work on the mold. You can see the final surface on the mold. Then I prepped the mold, laid in some layers and a new door popped out. It's hard to tell in the pictures but the surface finish turned out great. I added some cardboard rolls in the back to make it stiff. It is attached to the car with push button locks and pins on the bottom. For the final touch I 3d printed a door handle.
    2 points
  6. thanks! Gosh I’m not sure how to adjust the res of the photo’s uploaded here. I can try e-mailing them to myself and uploaded from a computer instead of from my phone. The pictures themselves are huge files on the iPhone. Here is a vid I posted on IG today. Got my rear suspension in thanks to the helpful folks here at HybridZ @JMortensen, @jhm, @Ben280 And more IMG_5985.MP4
    2 points
  7. It would be helpful certainly, but I think in general, Apex and Techno (to name a few) aren't making parts which require that level of explanation. Quick steer knuckles, adjustable sway bars and RCA blocks are about as intense as anyone has gone until Apex started doing their subframes, allowing for roll center adjustment. Otherwise, listing a spec as "Up to 4* more camber over stock" or "3" wider front track than stock" or "Stronger!" are just, to my mind, stating the obvious. As a counterpoint, GKTech who makes a huge variety of drop knuckles and extremely modified components does a fabulous job detailing their R&D and decision making: https://blog.gktech.com/blog/gktech-rear-suspension-uprights/ I think if companies for the Z were making parts like this, it would make sense to detail choices.
    2 points
  8. So I made a laser alignment tool based on a few Ideas I gleaned from the forum. I made a slip collar that fits over the CD009 output shaft that holds a 45ACP laser bore setter. I'm using this for the horizontal alignment. Works well. I made a target that has a couple of alignment lines. The bottom is parallel/perpendicular to those lines so you can use a level to get it plumb. I then proceeded to drill so many holes in it that it's almost useless:) The key word here is almost. That was a far over to centerline as I could get it. I need to rework either the Diff mount or the trans mount to get it any further but it's only about a half a degree so I may live with it. I'm running the Technoversions RT mount and I switched to the top mount instead of the stock bottom. This brought the pinion angle down to 2.8 degrees. The transmission is at 2.9 degrees so I'm pretty satisfied. Hard to tell if it made much of a difference but the math says it should.
    2 points
  9. As I mentioned on the previous page, a prop valve in the front is never a good idea. As brake pressure increases, the proportion of braking done by the circuit with the valve decreases. With a valve in the front, the harder you hit the brakes, the lower the percentage of front brakes you get. This is not good, because the harder you hit the brakes, the more weight transfers to the front wheels and off of the rears. So the wheels with less traction get an increasing proportion of the braking effort as you step on the brakes harder and harder. "Proportioning Modifications We could start this section by clearly stating that you should not modify your proportioning valve. But, what fun would that be? In all seriousness, making changes to the proportioning valve to effect brake bias should be left to those with the proper tools and measurement devices, but if you have tweaked your vehicle beyond recognition, this may be your only solution to restore a sense of proper bias to your braking system. We’ll start here with three of the most basic rules regarding proportioning valve installation and selection. 1. If you have the deeply-rooted need to install your own adjustable proportioning valve, be advised that they should NEVER be installed if the factory unit is still in place. Proportioning valves in series with one another can do nasty, unpredictable things! 2. If you have the deeply-rooted need to install your own adjustable proportioning valve, be advised that they should NEVER be installed in-line to the front brakes. The effect would be to make your vehicle rear-biased before you could say “terminal oversteer.” Front brake line pressure should always be left alone – only the rear pressures should be considered for proportioning. 3. In all cases, the basic brake system balance needs to be close to optimized to start with. This is the only way that a proportioning valve can be effectively utilized. You should never assume that simply adding a proportioning valve will address all rear-bias conditions, as even the best proportioning valves must be well-matched to the target vehicle." https://www.apcautotech.com/getmedia/d958a29e-4ebf-41fd-931f-bf7e4451801b/brake-proportioning-valves.pdf
    2 points
  10. Found a site for downloading the FSM that I have never seen before, with a lot of nice information, link below http://240260280.com/Docs/
    2 points
  11. The plan was to do some track days this year, so I needed some brake ducts and an oil cooler. I sold/bartered a set of series 1 scooped backing plates I had for a set of normal ones. No need to cut up the rare stuff. Took the new backing plates, cut them to 8" diameter, took a 3" exhaust collector and modded it to fit the cut down backing plate. Welded, drilled holes in the duct hole and then used cut off wheel and die grinder to open the hole in the backing plate up. Also took a section of the rim of the stock backing plate and welded it on for stiffness and to close the gap between the backing plate and the rotor vents. Doesn't look all that wonderful but I think it's going to work well. 1 down, 1 to go, then can modify my front end for the scoops and hook up the tubing.
    2 points
  12. Old Thread, but if you are looking for a 280zx ducktail spoiler, we keep them in stock and ship out within 2-3 days. https://bhjautomotive.com/shop/exterior/280zx-tall-bre-rear-wing/ Thanks!
    2 points
  13. Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
    2 points
  14. an LS is also vastly more expensive then a traditional 350 swap. He should do whatever he wants to do.
    2 points
  15. Thanks to everyone that purchased a piece of apparel in the fundraiser to help @SuperDan with operating costs for the site! We sold a total of 88 shirts with a resulting profit of $1202.19, which I just sent 100% of to Dan. It won't show as a donation because I sent it via friends and family to ensure every penny made it to him. This should cover the site's costs for about 6 months. Moving forward, I'll be doing an annual apparel sale with 100% being donated towards operating expenses. Each year we'll do a different promotional item since many of you now have several HybridZ shirts in your closet! Looking forward to hearing your ideas on what you'd like to see along with the shirts. Hats, beanies, keychains, stickers, etc all come to mind.
    2 points
  16. Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
    2 points
  17. katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
    2 points
  18. It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
    2 points
  19. I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
    2 points
  20. Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
    2 points
  21. Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
    2 points
  22. Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
    2 points
  23. Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
    2 points
  24. I know everyone knows this already but 250hp/300ft-lbs is handled easily by the stock R200 long nose. Until the 8.8 became the hottest topic, the long nose R200 was considered just fine for all mild V8 swaps and some fairly upgraded ones too. Drag racers have run the R200 well into the 11s without issue (other than the lack of LSD options/ratios).
    2 points
  25. Machine work finished! I can relax a little:) Just got done with their first bath. Still need de-buring and edge finishing but the majority of the work is done. The VCT holes are drilled and tapped but they haven’t been drilled all the way through. Easily opened up with a drill if needed. The head has provisions for three sub plates. Timing chain idler, upper tensioner and a slack side guide pivot. The idler and tensioner are connected to the oil system and o-ringed. It is getting really crowded in there with all the oil passages, head bolts and cam tower bolts. Next stop vacuum resin impregnation.
    2 points
  26. Ready for battle! Getting geared up to start machining the heads. Officially the first production run.
    2 points
  27. With all do respect newzed you have contrbuted nothing new to the solution of the problem that I had not already addressed many weeks back with DSS. I may not be using terms that agree with you.... I said “bind and won’t turn” and you prefer “won’t spin”. Your suggestion of filing off a dust cap is impossible as we are talking about solid billet machined parts that are meant to be to spec. You just can’t take a file to this stuff and call it good and I don’t own a lathe. I purchased these parts at great cost per DSS selling them as bolt on and in regularly use on many S30 Z’s. They have since admitted that they have NEVER had this stub axle on 240Z and admitted that there stub axle was previously copied off of an unknown Datsun stub axle they were told was an S30. I have supplied them all of the measurements using my mics and calipers for the risers so the bearing would fit per spec. Unfortunately, the first riser was not machined to measurements I provided so they did them a second time, this time per my measurements and they are perfect. Great, however the billet machined shoulder then cam into contact with the housing and again would not spin. Soooooo I sent them a stock 240Z OEM stub axle along with their axles with the understanding that DSS would machine into the billet stub axle the proper recess and width allowing the stub axle to fit as OEM with the stock stamped dust cap. DSS sent the axles back to me with shoulder machined down but without the necessary recess. I called them concerned they still would not fit however, per their instructions, bolted them back up as they were “within .005 tolerance of OEM”. I bolted them back up and they continue to press against the housing and will not spin. I called DSS with the bad news and they said “sorry, we didn’t think the recess was that important”. My response was “why didn’t you just machine the axle to match the OEM one I sent”? There Response- “Im not sure i need to talk to the machine shop”. As of this afternoon, DSS has requested I send it all back one more time and they will make it right. I’m going to give them that opportunity again as I am to far into this to just turn back. So, after month of emails, pictures, and sourcing hardware to fit (since the supplied hardware hits the differential on the adapter side of this conversion) I am again hoping that DSS machines these stub axles to OEM spec. Keep in mind, this is advertised as a “bolt in no modification kit”. Im really not offended that I’m not making sense to you. I’m offended and ticked off that I was sold a product that has never actually been bolted on to a 240Z and that I have been patiently (admittedly sometimes not so) trying to help them produce a useable product from the other side of the U.S with phone calls emails and pictures. The final straw is sending them an OEM axle with the instructions “make a copy of this” and it still came back machined wrong. Every point you have made regarding bearings and risers and clearance I agree with fully and in fact I communicated to them to fix those issues as they arose. It’s been a long process. I’m sorry I can’t satisfy your deepest need for every piece of communication and I honestly can’t tell you why they keep getting it wrong. Funny thing is, they can’t explain it either, but they sure as heck are not blaming me. Lee thanked me for my patience with all of DSS mistakes. Getting into a war of words is not my bag. I’m bummed out this crap is clogging up the forum. I apologize if I offended you. I’m really just a hard working guy that loves Z’s and gearhead culture in general. I’ve been building and racing for most of my 50 years of life (first kart and motorcycle age 5) and building cars in my garage is my therapy..... supposed to be fun. Given all my frustration with this purchase, i just needed a place to vent and I really want others to avoid the same. So hearing that I’m a whining complainer that doesn’t know what the hell he is saying and is incompetent to turn a wrench hits where it hurts to be perfectly honest. Agree to disagree is cool with me, time to let this squabble go. With respect, Jim
    2 points
  28. Just installed 5mm flat bar at the bottom of Lancer EVO8 Recaro seat. I need to drill a adjustment hole on the original seat rails.
    2 points
  29. Slow progress. Close to finishing up the rear suspension. I keep finding things I need to clean and paint. But it is getting there. I suppose its time for the big reveal. Based on Cary's sugggestion, I am going with an external shock. Not sure I can get away with it, but its easily reversable. It was surprisingly easy to do. I used adjustable shock brackets from AA Manufacturing with a some angle iron for strength. Even easier in the front to connect to tubing. I used 1/2 threaded rod with rod ends to mock it up. I 3d printed a shock body to make sure there was clearance. I took a set of cheap Toyota MR2 struts and drilled a little hole in the bottom to drain out the oil. They are loaded in the strut tubes just for keeping geometry, no friction. The only tricky part is the motion ratio is different than the strut. Right now I am thinking Penske 7500's for the shock. They are reasonably priced, come custom valved to my parameters, have multiple lengths, and are double adjustable.
    1 point
  30. Ok… never done this before. Bought a devilbiss gun for $40 on eBay last year and finally got the chance to take it for a spin. I’m using Speedokote 2K DTM primer in the gallon size. Threw my rear wheels on and carted the sucker out to my driveway. 3 hours of spraying, and she is coated! Everything from the door/fender jam forward is complete. Really excited, because now I can actually see an end in sight! Glad I didn’t try to do it all at once, as the primer does not flow as well as I’d hoped (Need to buy a reducer for it). Now I need to fabricate an AL gauge/switch cluster (so I can weld the roll-bar mounts) clean/scrub the interior and I can primer through to the rear door-jam. OH! ARC switch cluster came in. This sucker in neat! Fuses and relays all-in-one, with a ribbon cable to the switches themselves. IMG_7892.MOV
    1 point
  31. Couple pics of various cars that got back to me with progress of their builds.
    1 point
  32. Story time. As many of you who have followed along for a while know the timing chain arrangement has been my White Whale since the beginning. I knew I wanted to use the KA24 timing chain setup and for the most part I was able to make that work. The problem was there just wasn’t enough room to fit the pivoting slack side guide and have it pivot at the bottom like it’s supposed to. The compromise was to pivot it at the top, use a custom guide and use the bottom tensioner in the stock L6 position. This worked but the custom guide had to be a little thin in one area to clear the lower timing cover. Now here comes a lesson for all you aspiring engineers out there and how solutions to complex problems can be incredibly simple. I was speaking to Brian at Rebello after he finished the KN20 build they did for Z Car Garage. This was the first build they did for a sub 3.2L and they decided to use my system as opposed to the more complex system they designed for for the 3.5 motors. We were discussing the lack of room on the slack side for the top pivoting guide and he mentioned that the KA24 heads have the idler gear pushed towards the tension side more than I had mine. I agreed this was worth looking into and set about manipulating the 3D model to see what I could make happen. I found I could pick up about 19mm by shoving the idler gear over. On the face of it a very simple solution to increasing the thickness of the pivoting guide. Problem solved. But wait it get’s better. As I was sitting at my work station shoving various 3D components around to see what was workable I realized a fair amount of room opened up on the top and there may be room to squeeze a tensioner up there and have the bottom pivot guide I always wanted. I contacted Tioga who is my go to person for all things OEM and he got me info on the various available external tensioners that could possibly work. The problem was they were all too big to fit. Then the epiphany. Why not design my own tensioner that will fit inside the existing available envelope. Booooooommmm. The hardest part was that I absolutely wanted it to retrofit to the existing heads I already had out there. It was apparent that this would work and fortunately I had a head still here so I set about with my tried and true mockup process. A little CAD/CAM add a little old school analog, bring the analog back to digital, rinse and repeat. I ended up with this mockup. The letter T represents where the tensioner piston is. And here is the final product. The adjustable cam sprockets are from Tomei FYI and are really well made. The slack side guide is much more robust and the front lower timing cover fits without any modifications. The stock L6 tension side guide fits with some minor slotting and cutting. The chain angles and flow look great so I’m super happy with the outcome. The tensioner is also the mount for the upper tensioner. The slack side tensioner uses the piston, spring, and check valve from a KA24 tensioner. The body is 6061 aluminum with a 4130 DOM (drawn over mandrel) honed sleeve inserted as the cylinder. The front of the head has scuppers to drain the oil from the valley and the new tension block blocked the right one. I had to machine a drain into it and decided to include a dribble hole to help oil the lower chain. Probably useless and the KA24 upper tensioner pukes so much oil that I doubt the lower chain will ever run dry but I felt like putting it in. It feels really good finally making this work and short of any minor changes this is going to be the go to chain system for anyone running a single row lower chain. PS. This is one of the original mockup picture of the timing chains and no one mentioned "You know the KA24 idler is pushed over towards the tension side more" So ultimately I'm blaming you guys for missing that.
    1 point
  33. Hi Guys and Gals, I couldn't find my original post but it was about 2013. I'm still making 250 GTO light covers from crack proof plastic so you can use any old drill bit without worry of cracking the covers. I'm asking $120/pair and the shipping is covered with $30. Please email me at: mclapp5526@gmail.com so I can send more photos and details or feel free to call anytime at: 816-286-6982 to talk about the covers. I also make the hood scoops for $50/pair. If you don't have trim rings (who does), I have proprietary rubber seal that keeps out moisture/dust and gives a really finished look for $45/pair. Thanks, Mark Clapp 816-286-6982
    1 point
  34. So here is what I ended up with on the OEM drum backing plate. Went with several 0.215 dia holes instead of one large oblong hole. I figured this was a reasonable compromise between venting, not weakening the steel too much, and doing something I had adequate tools for. When you add up the holes, it equates to a little over 2 in^2 of of passageway. Here a hoping It makes a difference! I opted not to drill/modify the AL drum since it already flexes so much at high temperatures.
    1 point
  35. Getting ready to paint the interior of the body shell. While working on this project, I have sort of been pondering how best to rustproof all the non-original lap joints that have resulted from the assorted modifications. Where possible, I primed the blind side of all the parts I welded on with epoxy, but there is still going to be bare metal (burned off) in close proximity to all the welds. There are also multiple seams where I removed the OEM seam sealer/paint and the epoxy in the course of stitch welding the shell. Since these cars like to rust as they come from the factory, and this specific one had pretty much dodged that bullet by living it's life in the desert, I did not want to add potential future corrosion areas....at least no more than absolutely necessary. Searching the internet for information on rustproofing car bodies during restoration revealed surprisingly little information. There is no consensus on the best way to do this (short of dip-priming, which for all practical purposes is unobtainable). As usual on the net, there is a wide variety of opinion, and those who seem to know the least are the ones who state their opinion in the most aggressive and obnoxious manner. I have some past experience with POR-15, some of it good, some not so good. But their recommendations for prep practically insisted on using their brand of metal prep followed by washing the surface with water. My project has huge areas of bare metal, and this just sounded like a questionable plan. I couldn't see how I could possibly dry it all quickly enough to avoid flash rust all over the place, including in many areas that I could not easily access to remove. I don't know if this is really absolutely necessary, or if POR-15 just wants to sell their metal prep. But I believed their advice, which led me to look at other products. So I tried "Rust Bullet". I tested it on some scrap metal, it adhered very well even with marginal prep, over light rust, you name it. It was also totally compatible with an overcoat of the epoxy primer I am using in the next step. It is an "apply on rust" product, which I wanted in case some unreachable surface rust has appeared in some of the lap joints during the time I have been working on the car. So after scuffing and cleaning everything, my next step was to apply Rust Bullet, with a brush, to all the joints where I felt there might be a danger of future corrosion. I chose the brush over spraying because it allowed me to force the chemical deep inside the joints in places where welding probably burned away all the primer. Next step is a light scuff on the Rust Bullet, overspray the joints with epoxy primer, seam sealer, then an overall coat of epoxy followed by single stage color. Then, Lizard skin sound/heat in specific areas and finally cover that with Raptor Liner. Thanks for looking.
    1 point
  36. That is definitely repairable on the surface but be prepared to have to replace at least twice as much as what looks rotted. Fortunately, that rot is forward of the engine cross member so I doubt you will have any structural issues. The inside can be extremely difficult to access, damn near impossible in alot of cases. I did a ton of repair work between the firewall and the cross member and I actually ended up cutting out the bottom of the frame in a long segment to make sure I got most of the rust. After welding in fresh coated steal, I drilled a hole open in the frame and sprayed in rust reformer, let that set up for a few days and then hit it with internal frame coating. Opening up the bottom of the frame all the way back to the firewall will give you access to the inside and let you determine what needs to be done. Fortunately, the vertical sides are what carry the load here, the bottom can usually be removed without compromising structural integrity as long as the motor is out of the car, which it appears to be. I would just assume that you will have to replace the entire bottom of the frame from half a foot forward of that rot all the way back to the firewall. It slopes down towards the firewall so if any moisture was trapped in the frame it would accumulate towards that area most likely.
    1 point
  37. Yeah I'm going to flip this 280z and thought while I have it, I (Could) do the swap, but it sounds like it's not worth the hassle. I dont plan on changing out the original L24 in my 71 only adding triple webbers..Should be fine, and yeah more weight would not help any. I didnt realize I needed to change the mustache bar and all that. I do like the idea of the limited slip from a LSD. But for now think I will just keep the original rear end. Thanks fellas.
    1 point
  38. Goodness I love this forum, you really can find everything. Quote from this thread: Pretty sure that is what happened. I measured what I did and found that I was sticking 13mm past the flange of the aluminum spacer at first, that caused the pre-load on the master and the exact symptom of the brakes coming on and staying on. Then on the side of the freeway I moved it down to 6mm past the flange and the car drove back with no problems. I have it currently set to 9mm which is in spec, but I will be checking for preload and complete release to make sure I don't run into problems again.
    1 point
  39. For my '71, I had the local high school metal shop cut one out on their plasma cutter. I gave them a pattern traced from the later style boot, including the screw holes. A real life project for the students and no cost, or skill required, for me. Win/Win! Dennis
    1 point
  40. That is weird. You could release the three bent over clips (picture below) and pull the axles, leaving the sealing plate behind. Maybe you'll find something odd. Maybe they fastened the sealing plate on then assembled the CV afterward. People do strange things, like they did on your inboard CV. I posted a link to where my earlier picture came from that showed a source for the axles. They were used on 2+2 280ZX's or turbo 280ZX's. They're hard to find and sometimes the aftermarket parts are different. If you find one at a parts store take your old one to compare lengths. https://picclick.com/2x-CV-Joint-Axle-Assembly-Rear-Fits Datsun-280ZX-253130612896.html
    1 point
  41. Lol yeah, I assumed as much. Figured on that first compression/decompression plastic ones would pop fairly quickly.
    1 point
  42. I thought I would give it a full month to let the grease soak in, the red grease is Redline assembly lube, the dark grease is from wiping my finger around the ball joint of my DD. The fabric came out much better than I thought it would, there is still a light stain from the dark grease and the Redline is almost certainly just the dye in the lube. If these were cleaned off soon after it happened I'm sure you would see no traces. This was done with clean white T shirt cotton and Brakekleen, keep rubbing until the cotton comes away clean.
    1 point
  43. The owner of S/N005 sent me this video. Xtreme Cylinder Heads CNC porting. I have no idea why the video is giant. I uploaded it directly to the post Video.MOV
    1 point
  44. Got the VTC cams back from Schneider so I was able to mess around a bit wit the upper chain. Machining the center out of a stock Honda exhaust gear. Holy bajezas was that thing hard. I had to anneal the center to make any headway through it. Came out great though. Action shot. Looks promising but there is a lot left to do. Best part is my stuff is always S/N001
    1 point
  45. Actually, it was the whole Tune that was just not very good. I did a Remote Tuning session with Brett and built him a new Tune from scratch . It's running fine now. There is a problem with noise on the Coolant sensor, but we are addressing that. Idle issue was actually due to very poor VE and Spark Maps. Large jumps between adjacent RPM and Kpa cells were one of the big issues. There is no Sync loss now with new Tune. Another happy Customer
    1 point
  46. I can see how those pedantic details are germane to a discussion about a V8 rally/safari inspired build like the one the OP is building. Oh wait, no I can't. OP, you want to see something RIDICULOUS? Take a look at the bolt in roll bar that they used in those old works cars. I was ROFL when I saw one for the first time...
    1 point
  47. Thanks Dan! I'm not quite ready to announce the final number yet, but hopefully we can cover operating expenses for more than 6 months with this.
    1 point
  48. That is why I have both.....
    1 point
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