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  1. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  2. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  3. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  4. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  5. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  6. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  7. 2 points
  8. 2 points
    Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
  9. 2 points
    I know everyone knows this already but 250hp/300ft-lbs is handled easily by the stock R200 long nose. Until the 8.8 became the hottest topic, the long nose R200 was considered just fine for all mild V8 swaps and some fairly upgraded ones too. Drag racers have run the R200 well into the 11s without issue (other than the lack of LSD options/ratios).
  10. 2 points
    Machine work finished! I can relax a little:) Just got done with their first bath. Still need de-buring and edge finishing but the majority of the work is done. The VCT holes are drilled and tapped but they haven’t been drilled all the way through. Easily opened up with a drill if needed. The head has provisions for three sub plates. Timing chain idler, upper tensioner and a slack side guide pivot. The idler and tensioner are connected to the oil system and o-ringed. It is getting really crowded in there with all the oil passages, head bolts and cam tower bolts. Next stop vacuum resin impregnation.
  11. 2 points
    Ready for battle! Getting geared up to start machining the heads. Officially the first production run.
  12. 2 points
    With all do respect newzed you have contrbuted nothing new to the solution of the problem that I had not already addressed many weeks back with DSS. I may not be using terms that agree with you.... I said “bind and won’t turn” and you prefer “won’t spin”. Your suggestion of filing off a dust cap is impossible as we are talking about solid billet machined parts that are meant to be to spec. You just can’t take a file to this stuff and call it good and I don’t own a lathe. I purchased these parts at great cost per DSS selling them as bolt on and in regularly use on many S30 Z’s. They have since admitted that they have NEVER had this stub axle on 240Z and admitted that there stub axle was previously copied off of an unknown Datsun stub axle they were told was an S30. I have supplied them all of the measurements using my mics and calipers for the risers so the bearing would fit per spec. Unfortunately, the first riser was not machined to measurements I provided so they did them a second time, this time per my measurements and they are perfect. Great, however the billet machined shoulder then cam into contact with the housing and again would not spin. Soooooo I sent them a stock 240Z OEM stub axle along with their axles with the understanding that DSS would machine into the billet stub axle the proper recess and width allowing the stub axle to fit as OEM with the stock stamped dust cap. DSS sent the axles back to me with shoulder machined down but without the necessary recess. I called them concerned they still would not fit however, per their instructions, bolted them back up as they were “within .005 tolerance of OEM”. I bolted them back up and they continue to press against the housing and will not spin. I called DSS with the bad news and they said “sorry, we didn’t think the recess was that important”. My response was “why didn’t you just machine the axle to match the OEM one I sent”? There Response- “Im not sure i need to talk to the machine shop”. As of this afternoon, DSS has requested I send it all back one more time and they will make it right. I’m going to give them that opportunity again as I am to far into this to just turn back. So, after month of emails, pictures, and sourcing hardware to fit (since the supplied hardware hits the differential on the adapter side of this conversion) I am again hoping that DSS machines these stub axles to OEM spec. Keep in mind, this is advertised as a “bolt in no modification kit”. Im really not offended that I’m not making sense to you. I’m offended and ticked off that I was sold a product that has never actually been bolted on to a 240Z and that I have been patiently (admittedly sometimes not so) trying to help them produce a useable product from the other side of the U.S with phone calls emails and pictures. The final straw is sending them an OEM axle with the instructions “make a copy of this” and it still came back machined wrong. Every point you have made regarding bearings and risers and clearance I agree with fully and in fact I communicated to them to fix those issues as they arose. It’s been a long process. I’m sorry I can’t satisfy your deepest need for every piece of communication and I honestly can’t tell you why they keep getting it wrong. Funny thing is, they can’t explain it either, but they sure as heck are not blaming me. Lee thanked me for my patience with all of DSS mistakes. Getting into a war of words is not my bag. I’m bummed out this crap is clogging up the forum. I apologize if I offended you. I’m really just a hard working guy that loves Z’s and gearhead culture in general. I’ve been building and racing for most of my 50 years of life (first kart and motorcycle age 5) and building cars in my garage is my therapy..... supposed to be fun. Given all my frustration with this purchase, i just needed a place to vent and I really want others to avoid the same. So hearing that I’m a whining complainer that doesn’t know what the hell he is saying and is incompetent to turn a wrench hits where it hurts to be perfectly honest. Agree to disagree is cool with me, time to let this squabble go. With respect, Jim
  13. 2 points
    Just installed 5mm flat bar at the bottom of Lancer EVO8 Recaro seat. I need to drill a adjustment hole on the original seat rails.
  14. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone that purchased a piece of apparel in the fundraiser to help @SuperDan with operating costs for the site! We sold a total of 88 shirts with a resulting profit of $1202.19, which I just sent 100% of to Dan. It won't show as a donation because I sent it via friends and family to ensure every penny made it to him. This should cover the site's costs for about 6 months. Moving forward, I'll be doing an annual apparel sale with 100% being donated towards operating expenses. Each year we'll do a different promotional item since many of you now have several HybridZ shirts in your closet! Looking forward to hearing your ideas on what you'd like to see along with the shirts. Hats, beanies, keychains, stickers, etc all come to mind.
  15. 1 point
    I don't know a ton. Previous owner had it for 10 years. Didn't drive it much. Kept it fairly clean. Owner before that was in TX. Very little scale rust. Clean car. It's been swapped to an L28. Has round top SUs. 5 speed trans. Definitely some work on it here and there, but fairly stock, original. I've changed the oil and plugs. I'm going to do trans and rear end fluids asap as well. I drove it home from the seller, 90 miles. Mostly back country roads and some highway. It'll do 70+ no problem. But it doesn't FEEL great. For a beautifully running 73, I'm happy to far. I got a crazy deal on it, $4500. Been a dream car since I was a kid. So I couldn't be happier.
  16. 1 point
    Will be interesting to see how this changes things
  17. 1 point
    If the rear cylinders were leaking there would be fluid. Did you see any? Sounds more like a bad MC. The front and rear systems are stacked, in series. If one seal fails the pedal will drop that distance until the second one catches. Your new MC might fix it. Here's a drawing, they're all the same. The right seal contains the fluid, the other two create pressure. You can see how you can lose one but keep pressure on the other end.
  18. 1 point
    I appreciate the review of the brake pad materials. I'm curious why you have not gone to a vented front rotor? That's the main reason I am changing from stock S30 brakes, as I like to drive road courses and brake cooling seems to be important. My setup will be 280ZX front calipers with turned down Z31 front rotors and Maxima rear calipers with late S130 rotors; I am shooting for a 280ZX-type brake system, so I will also swap in the 15/16 MC and late S130 prop valve. I would like to report results this summer, but there is so much to do on the car...
  19. 1 point
    I have a pair available. If you are interested email me at zedsn@hotmail.com
  20. 1 point
    Ok, just took the 77/280 off the rotisserie so had a chance to weigh it, this is just the shell, all paint was removed then 2 coats of epoxy primer were applied and 2 coats of undercoat, the only thing left on the car is the vinyl headliner and the 2 rear wheel arch vinyls. Now I'm not 100% on this method but I couldn't think of any other way to do it with what I had on hand. With the car level the rear measurement was taken with the car hanging from the rotisserie bar that bolts on where the tie down hooks usually are, then jacks were placed under the rear rotisserie bar and the front was weighed hanging from the front rotisserie bar that is bolted to where the bumper shocks attach just in front of the radiator support. I checked the accuracy of the crane scale by lifting my small anvil which I know is 118 lbs and it was bang on, I have to apologize, I forgot to take a pic of the rear measurement but it weighed 289 lb, front was 246 lbs 289lbs 246lbs 535lbs minus the 6lbs of the rotisserie bars, is 529 lbs Someone with better geometry skills than me will have to verify if the method I used is valid.
  21. 1 point
    Mpg depends largely on engine management: carburetor vs. fuel injection, camshaft profile and so forth. 20 mpg should be readily attainable even with a more aggressive engine build. However, truly high efficiency, in the sense of a modern sports car, will be hard to attain - even with the 240Z's weight advantages. The reason is lousy drag coefficient... the bane of good highway mileage. To answer your questions: 1. Do as little as possible, at least initially! Complete the swap, get the engine running and the car sorted out. Engine mods can come later. 2. This is entirely subjective and situational. So enterprising drag-racers are pushing 500-700 hp (or more!) without molesting the "stock" look. 3. Never, ever ever install a non-overdrive transmission in a "daily driver" Z! Your application is screaming for a T5. 4. Initially, do nothing. Between your relatively weak stock 350 and the stock wheels/tires, the R180 differential in your 240Z should be adequate. Later you can swap in the much stronger R200. Search the "drivetrain FAQ" for model years/varieties from which to swap the R200. The #1 discriminator between failure and success, is the condition of the Z that's about to become the swap candidate. Rust? Overall condition? How is the suspension? The brakes? Do things work in general? Are bits falling off? Rubber? Plastic? Doors close properly? Dents/body damage? Electrical systems? You're about to do an engine swap. Don't also make it a restoration. The #2 discriminator is falling into the "while I'm at it" malaise. Do as little as possible! Laziness is always its own reward, but sometimes it's also this best route to quick and definitive success. This is one such instance. Be strategically lazy!
  22. 1 point
    Really cool. Love it. Never seen that swap before.
  23. 1 point
    Thanks! I looked into that at one point, too, with the swp but they all seemed to mount too far out and would either hit the inner fender well or not clear the hood. This bracket kit for the lwp is pretty simple, looks clean, and worked well with my mostly stock wiring.
  24. 1 point
    Depends what you want. I like 16s and can confirm that with narrow coilover conversion RBR 16x8 +10 fit with stock arches and 225 tyres, anything that brings the wheel further to the outside of the car than this could potentially lead to the need to run 215s although you may get way with a 0 offset. Usually more choice in 15" by the way but I prefer 16" and need it to clear my brakes. Good tip, don't use the forum search, use google using hybridz.org at the start, always gets better results. I searched when I was a newbie and it took a lot of time, but the answers are there. Just make sure to check more than 1 source, ideally more than two.
  25. 1 point
    Got a new batch of flanges all done. Some of the costs went up marginally unfortunately. Now $205 Shipped and request you pay via friends/family to cut down on my fees. Jig rental cost down to $20 from $30 however. Total $225 with Jig rental, plus you ship jig to next user.
  26. 1 point
    Here's a little better markup. I am asking for the length of the yellow lines I've drawn in.
  27. 1 point
    Don't lie @cgsheen, you just find it as hilarious as I do watching Jeff perform the same job 3 times. 😂
  28. 1 point
    Probably the "reaction disc" in the booster. A common enough problem that it has an FAQ entry. http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/69706-reaction-disk-pictures-and-walkthrough/
  29. 1 point
    It's an old car that looks cool. Some people buy them just to have them in the garage, and never actually drive them. If you're looking for a daily driver, read through the many threads on this site to see what's involved in keeping them running. Looks like you should plan on having two cars for a while. Ideally, the other will be a truck so that you can haul parts, like engines and transmission. And expect to spend some money. Nickels and dimes will add up quickly. If it didn't need time and money he probably wouldn't be selling it. Lastly - do you like your neighbor now? Because you're going to find all of the "previous owner" stuff he did. Or he might be hanging out all the time pining over his old car.
  30. 1 point
    FYI, Porterfield offers shoes for the factory drums. https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=3986 https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=12839 https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=3985
  31. 1 point
    I really like how the paint changes color in the light. In a dark setting its more of a copper base and in the light its a nice orange. I almost had the engine bay painted black as well but after all the hard work put into making it smooth I opted to keep it orange. The frame rails and bumper ends were painted black. Like I said, clear coat is still to come and then the glass is getting put in and its coming back to me!!😊
  32. 1 point
    Thankyou Jhm, I dropped them a e-mail in Germany. Specific springs for 280z are hard to find via their web sited. Let see, Thx Joost
  33. 1 point
    Move this post to the "Engine Components/EMS/Megasquirt" Forum and look for "Chickenman" and/or "softopz". Chickenman does remote setups and tuning for a modest fee.
  34. 1 point
    Go to your local community and sign up for a welding class. They usually aren't that expensive are incredibly valuable for a person with no experience welding. Afterwards you'll have a skill.
  35. 1 point
    These guys sell shims that thick and thicker. http://www.precisionshims.com.au/products/slotted I have them in my engine and would recommend them.
  36. 1 point
    Gorilla lugs are really strong and come in a variety of colors.
  37. 1 point
    Before proceeding, check that your rear shoes are not worn out and or not adjusted. Per question 7, it is possible that the reaction disk has fallen out. It is a rubber disk about the size of a quarter and 1/4 inch thick and goes between the booster and the MC push rod. They typically fall out when people change the MC , try to adjust the push rod, pull the push rod too far out of the booster such that the reaction disk is pulled out of a pocket it sits in and falls to the bottom of the booster. Symptom: pedal travels almost to the floor and then the brakes grab really hard. Recommend that you search HybridZ. There is a post by a member that details this problem. It may be in the FAQ bake section or in the brake forum. Do your research and before doing the next step. You will need to visually confirm that the disk has fallen out. 1. You do not have to remove the MC for this. 2. Remove the nuts that hold the MC to the booster. 3. Do not remove the brake lines from the MC. Just pull it away from the booster and push it aside. 4. Remove the spacer that goes between the MC and the booster. 5. With a flashlight, look inside the booster where the push rod is. You will see a star shaped "keeper" that holds the push rod seal in place. 6. Carefully remove the keeper so you don't bend it. You may have to reshape it when reinstalling it. 7. After the keeper is removed pull on the push rod until it comes out. The seal will come out with it. 8 With a flashlight look at the pocket in the booster where the push rod sits. You should see a black rubber disk. If all you see is shiny metal pocket, then the disk has fallen out. Now you have a choice: 1. Remove the booster and shake it around until the disk falls out or 2. Buy a new booster as it will have a disk installed. Note if you pull the push rod out too far while adjusting the length per the FSM then the new disk will fall out. Recommend that you glue (JB Weld) the disk to the push rod, even on new units. Just orient the booster in a vise with the push rod pointed up vertically. Dig out the disk , glue it to the push rod and then replace the push rod, seal and keeper in the booster. This will save your mental heath when adjusting the push rod length. Your Z is over 40 years old. In the interest of safety, I always completely rebuild the brake system on old cars before putting them on the road.
  38. 1 point
    Take it from people who have actually raced these things. Well before the Internet was ever thought of. Put the Red loctite on. Especially if you are going to push the engine at all. Engine harmonics do bloody strange things. Nothing wrong with a little insurance. I lost a $1,200 Tilton crank in 1977 dollars because a stupid engine builder ( not me ) used the wrong bolt on a Tilton Crank pulley. Tilton Damper had a thicker hub. Required longer bolt. Engine builder did NOT use Red Loctite. Probably would have held fine if he did. And actually... bolts DO back out. That's wire Race cars also use Safety Wire. As do Airplanes. When your life is on the line you want to make damned sure that a critical bolt doesn't come loose from Vibration. Belts and suspenders every time.
  39. 1 point
    Welcome to the forums. I have moved your post from the FAQ section to allow responses. To answer your question, yes. Your stock axles should work with the correct OBX differential. Please take a moment to read the rules of the forum. Also note our search is not the best, try using google while limiting your search results to hybridz.org may yield easier to visualize results.
  40. 1 point
    https://www.amazon.com/Bilstein-34-184530-Suspension-Cartridge-Lowering/dp/B009FU7QVW
  41. 1 point
    I thought it was a pretty good price for that piece, glad it worked out for you.
  42. 1 point
    Best to start a new thread for this as not to clutter up his build thread
  43. 1 point
    Yes I found that I get around a 1/10 of the adjustment out of the camber plates vs adjustable control arms. I think I wait to use the KMAC plates if I ever do a coilover conversion.
  44. 1 point
    Got the last of the backorders in and packaged up! They'll be in the mail tomorrow and should be in your hands by Wednesday Again, my apologies on the delays.
  45. 1 point
    Ecoboost is just Fords slick marketing term for "turbocharged". Which engines are having these problems? Ford has many turbo engines. Also, posting in all caps is for 8 year olds and 70 year olds. Please refrain from doing so.
  46. 1 point
    Honestly for the effort involved just take it to the pros. I got all my strikers for hood , doors, trunks, ashtray, gas cap and ring plated for 40 or 50 $ locally here in Ottawa. I chose yellow for half the stuff and silver for the other half. They first acid dipped to remove any dirt and oils then gave them back to me just asked me to wire brush and clean off any paints to bring the cost down. I feel like getting everything zinc plated
  47. 1 point
    Awesome news Ryan, again thanks so much for doing these apparel runs!
  48. 1 point
    The printer said they were scheduled to run last Friday and then they have to ship the order to me. Hope that I'll get them by the middle of next week so I can pack and ship on the 18th. Give it a week to get to you guys and I'm thinking everyone should receive their stuff by the 25th.
  49. 1 point

    From the album: PLATA ZVETTE

    The coffee/gas AM clan
  50. 1 point
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