Jump to content
HybridZ

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/10/04 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  2. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  3. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  4. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  5. 2 points
  6. 2 points
    Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
  7. 2 points
    I know everyone knows this already but 250hp/300ft-lbs is handled easily by the stock R200 long nose. Until the 8.8 became the hottest topic, the long nose R200 was considered just fine for all mild V8 swaps and some fairly upgraded ones too. Drag racers have run the R200 well into the 11s without issue (other than the lack of LSD options/ratios).
  8. 2 points
    Machine work finished! I can relax a little:) Just got done with their first bath. Still need de-buring and edge finishing but the majority of the work is done. The VCT holes are drilled and tapped but they haven’t been drilled all the way through. Easily opened up with a drill if needed. The head has provisions for three sub plates. Timing chain idler, upper tensioner and a slack side guide pivot. The idler and tensioner are connected to the oil system and o-ringed. It is getting really crowded in there with all the oil passages, head bolts and cam tower bolts. Next stop vacuum resin impregnation.
  9. 2 points
    Ready for battle! Getting geared up to start machining the heads. Officially the first production run.
  10. 2 points
    With all do respect newzed you have contrbuted nothing new to the solution of the problem that I had not already addressed many weeks back with DSS. I may not be using terms that agree with you.... I said “bind and won’t turn” and you prefer “won’t spin”. Your suggestion of filing off a dust cap is impossible as we are talking about solid billet machined parts that are meant to be to spec. You just can’t take a file to this stuff and call it good and I don’t own a lathe. I purchased these parts at great cost per DSS selling them as bolt on and in regularly use on many S30 Z’s. They have since admitted that they have NEVER had this stub axle on 240Z and admitted that there stub axle was previously copied off of an unknown Datsun stub axle they were told was an S30. I have supplied them all of the measurements using my mics and calipers for the risers so the bearing would fit per spec. Unfortunately, the first riser was not machined to measurements I provided so they did them a second time, this time per my measurements and they are perfect. Great, however the billet machined shoulder then cam into contact with the housing and again would not spin. Soooooo I sent them a stock 240Z OEM stub axle along with their axles with the understanding that DSS would machine into the billet stub axle the proper recess and width allowing the stub axle to fit as OEM with the stock stamped dust cap. DSS sent the axles back to me with shoulder machined down but without the necessary recess. I called them concerned they still would not fit however, per their instructions, bolted them back up as they were “within .005 tolerance of OEM”. I bolted them back up and they continue to press against the housing and will not spin. I called DSS with the bad news and they said “sorry, we didn’t think the recess was that important”. My response was “why didn’t you just machine the axle to match the OEM one I sent”? There Response- “Im not sure i need to talk to the machine shop”. As of this afternoon, DSS has requested I send it all back one more time and they will make it right. I’m going to give them that opportunity again as I am to far into this to just turn back. So, after month of emails, pictures, and sourcing hardware to fit (since the supplied hardware hits the differential on the adapter side of this conversion) I am again hoping that DSS machines these stub axles to OEM spec. Keep in mind, this is advertised as a “bolt in no modification kit”. Im really not offended that I’m not making sense to you. I’m offended and ticked off that I was sold a product that has never actually been bolted on to a 240Z and that I have been patiently (admittedly sometimes not so) trying to help them produce a useable product from the other side of the U.S with phone calls emails and pictures. The final straw is sending them an OEM axle with the instructions “make a copy of this” and it still came back machined wrong. Every point you have made regarding bearings and risers and clearance I agree with fully and in fact I communicated to them to fix those issues as they arose. It’s been a long process. I’m sorry I can’t satisfy your deepest need for every piece of communication and I honestly can’t tell you why they keep getting it wrong. Funny thing is, they can’t explain it either, but they sure as heck are not blaming me. Lee thanked me for my patience with all of DSS mistakes. Getting into a war of words is not my bag. I’m bummed out this crap is clogging up the forum. I apologize if I offended you. I’m really just a hard working guy that loves Z’s and gearhead culture in general. I’ve been building and racing for most of my 50 years of life (first kart and motorcycle age 5) and building cars in my garage is my therapy..... supposed to be fun. Given all my frustration with this purchase, i just needed a place to vent and I really want others to avoid the same. So hearing that I’m a whining complainer that doesn’t know what the hell he is saying and is incompetent to turn a wrench hits where it hurts to be perfectly honest. Agree to disagree is cool with me, time to let this squabble go. With respect, Jim
  11. 2 points
    Just installed 5mm flat bar at the bottom of Lancer EVO8 Recaro seat. I need to drill a adjustment hole on the original seat rails.
  12. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone that purchased a piece of apparel in the fundraiser to help @SuperDan with operating costs for the site! We sold a total of 88 shirts with a resulting profit of $1202.19, which I just sent 100% of to Dan. It won't show as a donation because I sent it via friends and family to ensure every penny made it to him. This should cover the site's costs for about 6 months. Moving forward, I'll be doing an annual apparel sale with 100% being donated towards operating expenses. Each year we'll do a different promotional item since many of you now have several HybridZ shirts in your closet! Looking forward to hearing your ideas on what you'd like to see along with the shirts. Hats, beanies, keychains, stickers, etc all come to mind.
  13. 1 point
    Will message you regarding purchase. All other questions covered in PDF https://www.dropbox.com/s/23dj8il5rru20i3/Z31%20Turbo%20CV%20axle%20ConversionV4.pdf?dl=0
  14. 1 point
    I'm replacing most everything on my Z, and even trying to go as cheap as possible on everything, and using lots of junk yard parts and doing 100% of the labor myself, I still can't find a way to spend less then 15k. A much better way to do a "full" upgrade, would be to upgrade everything else that isn't engine related first (brakes, suspension, chassis strengthening, seats, paint, bodykit?, etc) before you touch the engine. As soon as the engine comes out, you'll want to upgrade everything "while you're there". At this point, just add 3-5 years onto whatever time budget you gave yourself unless you're one of those crazy singular focus ultra driven workhorses that apparently has no other hobbies. Man I'm jealous of those people. There's an Australian guy on youtube right who documented pretty much every aspect of his Z restoration. You might want to give his damn near 90 videos a watch and see if that's what you want to do. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_vb_SJctymCkwnF6sAwDg
  15. 1 point
    I used the eastwood on my car. It has the consistency of water, so cover under the car when you spray it because it will start coming out of all the holes, seams, cracks, etc.
  16. 1 point
    Motor is rated for 120 hp 179 ft.lbs peak. I should get somewhat better acceleration around town than the stock L28 (particularly since I get peak torque now from 0-3500 RPM), but with a reduced top speed. Continuous power output is only ~40hp, so based on that and gearing/drag calcs I've found online puts top speed around 90-100 mph (this car has the 5-speed transmission), which IMO is plenty fast for a 40 year old tin-can of a car. I expect around 90-100 miles of range out of this once everything is dialed in (suspension leveled out, front aero cleaned up, etc).
  17. 1 point
    Mpg depends largely on engine management: carburetor vs. fuel injection, camshaft profile and so forth. 20 mpg should be readily attainable even with a more aggressive engine build. However, truly high efficiency, in the sense of a modern sports car, will be hard to attain - even with the 240Z's weight advantages. The reason is lousy drag coefficient... the bane of good highway mileage. To answer your questions: 1. Do as little as possible, at least initially! Complete the swap, get the engine running and the car sorted out. Engine mods can come later. 2. This is entirely subjective and situational. So enterprising drag-racers are pushing 500-700 hp (or more!) without molesting the "stock" look. 3. Never, ever ever install a non-overdrive transmission in a "daily driver" Z! Your application is screaming for a T5. 4. Initially, do nothing. Between your relatively weak stock 350 and the stock wheels/tires, the R180 differential in your 240Z should be adequate. Later you can swap in the much stronger R200. Search the "drivetrain FAQ" for model years/varieties from which to swap the R200. The #1 discriminator between failure and success, is the condition of the Z that's about to become the swap candidate. Rust? Overall condition? How is the suspension? The brakes? Do things work in general? Are bits falling off? Rubber? Plastic? Doors close properly? Dents/body damage? Electrical systems? You're about to do an engine swap. Don't also make it a restoration. The #2 discriminator is falling into the "while I'm at it" malaise. Do as little as possible! Laziness is always its own reward, but sometimes it's also this best route to quick and definitive success. This is one such instance. Be strategically lazy!
  18. 1 point
    Thanks! I looked into that at one point, too, with the swp but they all seemed to mount too far out and would either hit the inner fender well or not clear the hood. This bracket kit for the lwp is pretty simple, looks clean, and worked well with my mostly stock wiring.
  19. 1 point
    Hey people, selling my V8Z. Just as an FYI, my join date shows July of '18, but I was a supporting member from way back in the day. Back then, when we were voting on a tag line, we came up with "Engineered to be Feared" and I bought one of the T-shirts we had made. Thought the old timers might get a kick out of it, so I added a pic of it. It's a little ratty at this point, but a bit of memorabilia. I bought this Z to turn it into a track car, but a car on my bucket list came up for sale and I bought it. Unfortunately, I can't keep both as I also have a 3rd fun car. Hard to justify having 3 fun cars when I have kids college fund to build up. This is a rust free California car with 383 stroker V8 swap and Borg Warner 5 speed transmission and ZEX nitrous system. It had been sitting in the back of the owners shop for a few years and needed to be gone through. But it has had a ton of money/work put into it. It has a welded in 4pt roll bar, Recaro power seats, 5pt harnesses, 11 different gauges, adjustable coil over suspension, bump steer spacers, disc brakes all around, R200 limited slip differential, strut tower braces, fuel cell, electric fuel pump, full dual exhaust, and roller thumper cam, (sounds glorious). It has a serpentine belt system and AC. I may be missing some mods, but you get the idea. It had been built as a show car back in the day according to the PO. It is NOT a show car by my standards, I call it a 5 footer. Looks perfect from 5ft away. Has a custom paint job, but there is some cracking here and there. Interior is decent, but needs some fluff and buff if your looking for a cool Cars & Coffee rig. I have replaced the oil, oil pan, coolant, radiator, oil/air filters, plugs, wires, installed rebuilt calipers all around, new front drilled rotors, and brand new sticky Yokohama's all around. It had some old school hot rod 2pc valve covers that are worth some $, I replaced with lighter ones and new gaskets. It fires right up and drives well, there is a hole in one of the headers that I just patched till I got around to replacing them, there is a lifter ticking (new set $68). PO said it made 500hp, I think that was including the NOS as it has iron heads. So I have been going through it, cleaning things up, and replacing key items, carpet in front is good, rear deck carpet needs replaced and other cosmetic things to address. All in all, you could go show build or track monster. If you are looking at these you know the prices have jumped big time for 240's. This one is far from original, but putting an original engine/trans back in would be a weekend job, if that is your thing. So I did not do this build myself, (my first V8Z Swap was a Ford 302) but I'll answer your questions as I can. The front brakes are the 4 piston Toyota conversion, the rear are from an 80's vette, all new with braided lines. It has adjustable coil overs, but the shocks are not adjustable. I don't know the make/valving as I have not pulled them. Does not have camber plates, but does have heim joint strut bars front and rear. If I kept it, I would rebuild the carb, it's a holly 4bbl sitting on a single plane intake, which works well with a stroker motor. I did a compression check and all the cylinders are around 155 psi. I'm asking $20,000 for it. Located In Columbus, Ohio. Thanks for reading this far, on to the pic's! For those who are serious, I can send specific pic's, running vids, etc. Don't know how much I'll be able to post here.
  20. 1 point
    Procedure is in the FSM Useful information Download a Factory Service Manual (FSM). http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/48825-factory-manuals-some/?page=2&tab=comments#comment-1208329 Download electrical schematics for your car. PDFs are easier to read than those found in books. Some are in color. Buy the book How to Restore Your Datsun Z Car by Wick Humble. It will save you hours of searching for "how to" info. Focus on searching Hybridz as 99% of questions have already been addressed. Start bookmarking Z car parts suppliers - there are many! Remember these are 40 year old cars and will need restoration to be safe and drivable. Join ClassicZCars.com website and search there as well. Become well informed about modifications before asking questions. People will be more inclined to answer informed questions. Search the forums. Useful Links: https://www.datsun-240z-upgrades.net/ Recommend the headlight relay harness http://zhome.com/ https://www.zcar.com/ http://www.classiczc...com/index.html/ http://www.zcarparts.com/ http://www.arizonazcar.com/ http://www.jagsthatrun.com/index.html
  21. 1 point
    $2995 can’t see myself paying that when there are other companies with great stuff like azc, techno, silvermine. The guys at Sema loved the z car garage brakes, but $2995.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Look at the picture of the temperature sender. The "top" has come off - I could tell that from the black goo oozing out in your pictures. That black "wire" you're pulling out is the internal wiring to the thermistor. It's broken so you don't need to be gentle with it anymore! Pull it out and disconnect the yellow wire from the top of the sender... Remove the nut and pull out the rest of the sender from the thermostat housing. Buy a new temperature sender online or at your local parts store and get it installed. (Save the "hold down" nut just in case the new sender doesn't come with one.) Nissan used the same resistance value for these senders for many years of Z's (and ZX's).
  24. 1 point
    FYI, Porterfield offers shoes for the factory drums. https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=3986 https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=12839 https://www.porterfield-brakes.com/product_info.php?productID=3985
  25. 1 point
    If you use the s12+8 calipers from the later years, they were machined to fit vented roters like the s12w ones but have smaller cylinders making for more of around 57% to 43%. This is what I run and am very happy with the setup.
  26. 1 point
    Cary (tube80z) has been mentioning this idea of the dual ball joint front end off and on for the last couple years. I hadn't really given it too much thought until I autoxed my car and was really lifting the inside rear tire, and Dan (74_5.0L_Z) suggested that the problem might be scrub radius and caster related. I guess the idea is that the outside wheelbase increases significantly enough due to scrub that the car leans over in that direction and the inside rear comes off the ground. Recently this thread popped up talking about swapping front suspensions and it quickly devolved into a pissing match for reasons beyond my comprehension, but it did get me thinking more seriously about the dual ball joint idea. Cary seems to think it's doable with the ball joints in the same plane, and had thought of a modified bumpsteer spacer as a possible way to do it. That got me thinking that it might be easier to just make a square tube knuckle and bumpsteer spacer combo, so that's where I'm at right now. Thinking square tube with simple clevises welded to it for the ball joints, and then taper the front end and have it open and then use shims above and below the tie rod to adjust bumpsteer. I have absolutely no idea how to figure out the spacing on the clevises to minimize scrub and that sort of thing but I'm very interested to see if I can make it work, and to see if it would be as easy as I think it should be.
  27. 1 point
    I really hate you for posting this, and I hate myself for clicking on the thread. I've started assembling the parts I need for hydro, but now I'm calling around sourcing the parts for electric. Thanks for making it a bit easier/harder to choose. 🙄
  28. 1 point
    4130 easier to machine than mild steel? Maybe close to the same if annealed which it typically is not. Usually comes normalized which is going to be harder than mild steel, not terrible but definitely harder. If you go to a thinner section it would likely be easier than the large thickness parts. Welding is certainly doable but you need to be more careful with heat zone, ideally post treat to normalize. Choose filler carefully, fit properly, etc. I plan on using pretty much all 4130 on my car on what I add in the cage, floors, etc. It is stronger if treated correctly and can be lighter at the same strength if you go thinner wall. For example I'll use 1-1/2" .095 tubing in the cage where you would normally use .120 wall to get a similar or maybe a little better strength and a lighter part ~20%. But you have to be careful not to make it brittle or soften things up to the point of mild steel strength with the thinner section which is then weaker. And it is MUCH more expensive. Not insane but substantially more for material. 4130 is good for high performance thin walled structure type applications. Any of the energy transfer parts like hubs/axles look at 4340 or even 300M is best unless you get into some of the new "wonder alloys" and proper heat treat. 300M isn't stronger than 4340 natively, it just allows you to heat treat to a higher level without getting brittle which is how you get a much stronger part. 4130 might be a good option but cold rolled would likely be fine for most applications. The thicknesses you are showing here are plenty IMO. I'd look at bracing and structure a bit rather than throwing mass at the parts. I'll bet that it could be done thinner and still keep plenty of strength even in mild steel. That saves money and weight. 4130 would be much thinner. Generally you can get more strength three ways: mass stronger materials better design/engineering The second two are much better for performance. Design is free other than the time to do it which in the business world means money. But only costs on the initial setup, free on everything after that, maybe even cheaper if done right. Materials - cost is higher raw cost and often higher fabrication/heat treat/procedures. You just have to weigh out what it's worth to you or whoever is going to be buying it. Not trying to offend here, some of that is my opinion but based on facts and how things are done in higher performance applications. Every build on here is done differently and one of the things I really appreciate and enjoy on this forum is the tact that is generally afforded. Everyone's vision and budget is different and there is room for all of that here.
  29. 1 point
    I wish I would have loved the ladder out of the background
  30. 1 point
    Haha! Caught me. That is a 1978 280z that I backdated with a bunch of 240z stuff, and painted for a Canadian gentleman. If you'd like I could copy and paste my thread from another site and upload that here. There was some pretty awesome rust repair that went into that one. He is hopefully coming to get his car, and a boat I fixed for him by the weekend, or early next week. here's a link to that thread. It's got a shit ton of pictures. http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?9043433-1978-Datsun-280z-quot-resto-mod-quot-Progress-Thread Some teasers. I can make the same thread on Hybrid if people feel that may be cool. Then perhaps the owner could take control of the thread and keep it updated throughout the life of his car. Twinning is winning. Not sure if you mean the composter (the cubic looking thing next to the fence and driveway). Food scaps and other organic material are thrown in there, and over the course of a few months it is rotated to transform the contents into excellent soil, rich in nutrients, to supplement with yearly planting.
  31. 1 point
    I can also add that once performance driving is tasted in an environment where it is safe to go beyond the traction envelope and spin out without harm.... you'll see the street never could have delivered the goods. "Adulthood" is a different pursuit entirely. ;) [Insert Peter Pan reference.]
  32. 1 point
    Concur 100%. In my experience across several states, Zs only have a chance at truly being competitive in FP. Other classes will have cars that we can't keep up with, if they show up. It's never fun to be the only car in your class and "win." Like all forms of racing, one must maximize class allowances to allow the driver a chance to compete. The S30 just isn't a platform for competition against a modern car. It is however that platform that connects driver to the road most directly. Our Zs are among the most exciting cars to autocross in terms of adrenaline for this reason. Racers with faster times get out of my Z hooting and hollering. I'm with Jon. I target competing against a few cars or drivers. I prefer to have a passenger than drive alone. Why hog the adrenaline? Get in! I pursue excitement. I feel like I win, because I'm driving my dream car since I was 17. And that's my best victory, really. FWIW.
  33. 1 point
    Calling the cage done, at least from the dash back. Also hit the tubes and welds with Scotchbrite so they are ready for primer.
  34. 1 point
    Just wanted to share my Z now that it's finally back from the body shop! Meant to say 4 months for most of my front end instead of 6. Just camera shy and stuttered. Didn't realize it till editing ahaha. The car will be weighed very soon and we estimate about 200-225lbs removed including the stripping of the interior. What else are you guys doing to your Z's to shed weight? This car has more carbon than Rocky Autos Z that was featured on Speedhunters some years back. And I haven't even ordered my dash yet!
  35. 1 point
    Owner of V3 sent me an update picture. Pretty freaking cool if you ask me. I checked the 3D model and tilted the amount they did the intake side of the water jacket is just below the outlet so hopefully there won't be any steam pocket issues. Snifff....I'm so proud:)
  36. 1 point
    If he doesn't get back to you, you may want to look into this https://hokeperformance.squarespace.com/store/l-series-6spd-transmission-adapter-03-06-vq35de
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    https://www.amazon.com/Bilstein-34-184530-Suspension-Cartridge-Lowering/dp/B009FU7QVW
  39. 1 point
    Car is sold. Thanks to everyone for the interest.
  40. 1 point
    I thought it was a pretty good price for that piece, glad it worked out for you.
  41. 1 point
    Hell- if you willing to spend that money , buy one of Datsun Works heads and something truly special
  42. 1 point
    Hi Guys, there is big differances with CVs. If parts wern't heat treated they would self destruct in no time. My kit is priced the way it is as I only use good quality parts. This is the CVs I use in my kit. http://www.rcvperformance.com/product-details.aspx?sku=301174M-28M As you can see they are $265.00 each that's almost a 1/3 of the cost of my kit. http://www.modern-motorsports.com/datsun-240z-280z-complete-cv-axle-conversion.html Joe
  43. 1 point
    Lumber arrived last Friday. Now if it would just stop raining long enough for me to do some framing.
  44. 1 point
  45. 1 point
    Ecoboost is just Fords slick marketing term for "turbocharged". Which engines are having these problems? Ford has many turbo engines. Also, posting in all caps is for 8 year olds and 70 year olds. Please refrain from doing so.
  46. 1 point
    Honestly for the effort involved just take it to the pros. I got all my strikers for hood , doors, trunks, ashtray, gas cap and ring plated for 40 or 50 $ locally here in Ottawa. I chose yellow for half the stuff and silver for the other half. They first acid dipped to remove any dirt and oils then gave them back to me just asked me to wire brush and clean off any paints to bring the cost down. I feel like getting everything zinc plated
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    The printer said they were scheduled to run last Friday and then they have to ship the order to me. Hope that I'll get them by the middle of next week so I can pack and ship on the 18th. Give it a week to get to you guys and I'm thinking everyone should receive their stuff by the 25th.
  49. 1 point
    Hi guys, New to the Z world, I just bought this car from a gentleman in Illinois. Seemed like he really cared about the car but had to let it go. I'm not sure if he was a poster on this forum but he did mention it. It's a 1975 280z. Most of this is quoted from the seller's listing. There's a lot more to say but here's the meat and potatoes. 1. 1999 GM LS1 from Trans Am with 118,000 miles, GM unlocked computer, PSI Conversions harness New water pump, oil pump, timing chain, starter, rebuilt injectors (Oside Tiger), fuel pump (MSD), fuel regulator, (Corvette regulator and filter) Sanderson ceramic coated headers, MSD plug wire with heat boots, braided AN fuel line, PSI harness,new valve cover gaskets, intake gasket, silicone intake hoses, K&N filter, LS6 converted valley cover, new starter 3” into 2.5” all stainless, tig welded exhaust with Vibrant resonator and Magna Flow muffler, all connections are V-bands. 2. Professionally rebuilt 4L60E transmission and torque convertor (less than 500 miles), OEM Camaro shifter with custom weldedand smoothed shifter box housed in trans tunnel, custom solid brass shift knob (looks like a manual), shortened shifter, JCI drive shaft, OEM rear end. The rear suspension is stock for the most part with exception of T3 coilovers and all poly bushings. 6. CUSTOM one-off American Racing forged wheels, model VN477, satin black 17x9 and 17x9.5 Brand new Continental Extreme DWS tires 245/45-17 front, 275/40-17 rear Custom yellow “continental” tire letters Technotoy Tuning coil overs (front and rear), front lower control arms, TC rods, triangulated front strut bar (not installed) SilverMine Motors Wilwood brake conversion, front and rear, powdercoated red Wilwood master cylinder and proportioning valve Technotoy front camber plates
  50. 1 point
    More progress, not much but something. Made a new bracket for the tension arm since the original bracket wouldnt fit my newly made frame rail. I started the downward bend to early and should had started it a little be later. I opted to make a whole new bracket in lieu of hacking up the stock one to make it work. Cut out a good chunk of rust on the fender well area. Made the support/stiffening plate for the frame rail. Not welded on yet, just snugly fitted for pics. Also made the mounting for the sway bar, kind of went over kill. I decided to have the bolt go through the entire frame. only thing left is wondering what I want to do for the tow hook mount...
×
×
  • Create New...