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  1. 2 points
    As I mentioned on the previous page, a prop valve in the front is never a good idea. As brake pressure increases, the proportion of braking done by the circuit with the valve decreases. With a valve in the front, the harder you hit the brakes, the lower the percentage of front brakes you get. This is not good, because the harder you hit the brakes, the more weight transfers to the front wheels and off of the rears. So the wheels with less traction get an increasing proportion of the braking effort as you step on the brakes harder and harder. "Proportioning Modifications We could start this section by clearly stating that you should not modify your proportioning valve. But, what fun would that be? In all seriousness, making changes to the proportioning valve to effect brake bias should be left to those with the proper tools and measurement devices, but if you have tweaked your vehicle beyond recognition, this may be your only solution to restore a sense of proper bias to your braking system. We’ll start here with three of the most basic rules regarding proportioning valve installation and selection. 1. If you have the deeply-rooted need to install your own adjustable proportioning valve, be advised that they should NEVER be installed if the factory unit is still in place. Proportioning valves in series with one another can do nasty, unpredictable things! 2. If you have the deeply-rooted need to install your own adjustable proportioning valve, be advised that they should NEVER be installed in-line to the front brakes. The effect would be to make your vehicle rear-biased before you could say “terminal oversteer.” Front brake line pressure should always be left alone – only the rear pressures should be considered for proportioning. 3. In all cases, the basic brake system balance needs to be close to optimized to start with. This is the only way that a proportioning valve can be effectively utilized. You should never assume that simply adding a proportioning valve will address all rear-bias conditions, as even the best proportioning valves must be well-matched to the target vehicle." https://www.apcautotech.com/getmedia/d958a29e-4ebf-41fd-931f-bf7e4451801b/brake-proportioning-valves.pdf
  2. 2 points
    Found a site for downloading the FSM that I have never seen before, with a lot of nice information, link below http://240260280.com/Docs/
  3. 2 points
    The plan was to do some track days this year, so I needed some brake ducts and an oil cooler. I sold/bartered a set of series 1 scooped backing plates I had for a set of normal ones. No need to cut up the rare stuff. Took the new backing plates, cut them to 8" diameter, took a 3" exhaust collector and modded it to fit the cut down backing plate. Welded, drilled holes in the duct hole and then used cut off wheel and die grinder to open the hole in the backing plate up. Also took a section of the rim of the stock backing plate and welded it on for stiffness and to close the gap between the backing plate and the rotor vents. Doesn't look all that wonderful but I think it's going to work well. 1 down, 1 to go, then can modify my front end for the scoops and hook up the tubing.
  4. 2 points
    Old Thread, but if you are looking for a 280zx ducktail spoiler, we keep them in stock and ship out within 2-3 days. https://bhjautomotive.com/shop/exterior/280zx-tall-bre-rear-wing/ Thanks!
  5. 2 points
    Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
  6. 2 points
    an LS is also vastly more expensive then a traditional 350 swap. He should do whatever he wants to do.
  7. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone that purchased a piece of apparel in the fundraiser to help @SuperDan with operating costs for the site! We sold a total of 88 shirts with a resulting profit of $1202.19, which I just sent 100% of to Dan. It won't show as a donation because I sent it via friends and family to ensure every penny made it to him. This should cover the site's costs for about 6 months. Moving forward, I'll be doing an annual apparel sale with 100% being donated towards operating expenses. Each year we'll do a different promotional item since many of you now have several HybridZ shirts in your closet! Looking forward to hearing your ideas on what you'd like to see along with the shirts. Hats, beanies, keychains, stickers, etc all come to mind.
  8. 2 points
  9. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  10. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  11. 2 points
    It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
  12. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  13. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  14. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  15. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  16. 2 points
  17. 2 points
    Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
  18. 2 points
    I know everyone knows this already but 250hp/300ft-lbs is handled easily by the stock R200 long nose. Until the 8.8 became the hottest topic, the long nose R200 was considered just fine for all mild V8 swaps and some fairly upgraded ones too. Drag racers have run the R200 well into the 11s without issue (other than the lack of LSD options/ratios).
  19. 2 points
    Machine work finished! I can relax a little:) Just got done with their first bath. Still need de-buring and edge finishing but the majority of the work is done. The VCT holes are drilled and tapped but they haven’t been drilled all the way through. Easily opened up with a drill if needed. The head has provisions for three sub plates. Timing chain idler, upper tensioner and a slack side guide pivot. The idler and tensioner are connected to the oil system and o-ringed. It is getting really crowded in there with all the oil passages, head bolts and cam tower bolts. Next stop vacuum resin impregnation.
  20. 2 points
    Ready for battle! Getting geared up to start machining the heads. Officially the first production run.
  21. 2 points
    With all do respect newzed you have contrbuted nothing new to the solution of the problem that I had not already addressed many weeks back with DSS. I may not be using terms that agree with you.... I said “bind and won’t turn” and you prefer “won’t spin”. Your suggestion of filing off a dust cap is impossible as we are talking about solid billet machined parts that are meant to be to spec. You just can’t take a file to this stuff and call it good and I don’t own a lathe. I purchased these parts at great cost per DSS selling them as bolt on and in regularly use on many S30 Z’s. They have since admitted that they have NEVER had this stub axle on 240Z and admitted that there stub axle was previously copied off of an unknown Datsun stub axle they were told was an S30. I have supplied them all of the measurements using my mics and calipers for the risers so the bearing would fit per spec. Unfortunately, the first riser was not machined to measurements I provided so they did them a second time, this time per my measurements and they are perfect. Great, however the billet machined shoulder then cam into contact with the housing and again would not spin. Soooooo I sent them a stock 240Z OEM stub axle along with their axles with the understanding that DSS would machine into the billet stub axle the proper recess and width allowing the stub axle to fit as OEM with the stock stamped dust cap. DSS sent the axles back to me with shoulder machined down but without the necessary recess. I called them concerned they still would not fit however, per their instructions, bolted them back up as they were “within .005 tolerance of OEM”. I bolted them back up and they continue to press against the housing and will not spin. I called DSS with the bad news and they said “sorry, we didn’t think the recess was that important”. My response was “why didn’t you just machine the axle to match the OEM one I sent”? There Response- “Im not sure i need to talk to the machine shop”. As of this afternoon, DSS has requested I send it all back one more time and they will make it right. I’m going to give them that opportunity again as I am to far into this to just turn back. So, after month of emails, pictures, and sourcing hardware to fit (since the supplied hardware hits the differential on the adapter side of this conversion) I am again hoping that DSS machines these stub axles to OEM spec. Keep in mind, this is advertised as a “bolt in no modification kit”. Im really not offended that I’m not making sense to you. I’m offended and ticked off that I was sold a product that has never actually been bolted on to a 240Z and that I have been patiently (admittedly sometimes not so) trying to help them produce a useable product from the other side of the U.S with phone calls emails and pictures. The final straw is sending them an OEM axle with the instructions “make a copy of this” and it still came back machined wrong. Every point you have made regarding bearings and risers and clearance I agree with fully and in fact I communicated to them to fix those issues as they arose. It’s been a long process. I’m sorry I can’t satisfy your deepest need for every piece of communication and I honestly can’t tell you why they keep getting it wrong. Funny thing is, they can’t explain it either, but they sure as heck are not blaming me. Lee thanked me for my patience with all of DSS mistakes. Getting into a war of words is not my bag. I’m bummed out this crap is clogging up the forum. I apologize if I offended you. I’m really just a hard working guy that loves Z’s and gearhead culture in general. I’ve been building and racing for most of my 50 years of life (first kart and motorcycle age 5) and building cars in my garage is my therapy..... supposed to be fun. Given all my frustration with this purchase, i just needed a place to vent and I really want others to avoid the same. So hearing that I’m a whining complainer that doesn’t know what the hell he is saying and is incompetent to turn a wrench hits where it hurts to be perfectly honest. Agree to disagree is cool with me, time to let this squabble go. With respect, Jim
  22. 2 points
    Just installed 5mm flat bar at the bottom of Lancer EVO8 Recaro seat. I need to drill a adjustment hole on the original seat rails.
  23. 1 point
    Car was final tuned a few weeks ago. With moving, being promoted, kids, remodeling . . .yadda yadda. I've started back on my projects, took some online tuning class over the winter and put them to use with my first attempt a dynoing my own car. Will dyno on e85 once I put the car back together and it's out of paint, still need to finish the interior and AC. 329 rwhp and 317 ftlb
  24. 1 point
    Why are you looking at the wiring on the combi switch? Unless you're replacing all the wiring, factory relays and all with an aftermarket setup, you only need to look at the engine bay connector wiring. I've got an early 74 260z and just wired up the honda motor, I believe the wire colors are the same. I won't be able to test it for a week or two because I'm still working on other wiring updates, but I'll report back when I do test it. I recommend adding a SPST relay to the circuit and lubricating the wiper linkage before swapping the wiper motor. I have very little experience with the Z, most of my car work has been old BMWs and Volvos, but I did take a multi-meter to a number of locations on the car and the voltage drop is pretty significant all around. I probably would not have done the swap as my wiring plans evolved and instead started with adding a SPST relay. You can quickly add the relay and possibly solve your slow wiper issues(also lube the two main wiper posts!). If it doesn't solve your issue, the relay won't have harmed anything or taken much time to install. If you unwrap the wiring harness where the wiper motor wires meet the main wiring harness about two feet from the engine bay connector there will be a LR (blue/red) single 18ga(16ga?) which splits into three and feeds the reverse light switch on the trans + washer pump motor. This wire is hot when the key is in and switched to Acc or Run. Cut this at the joint and the single becomes the trigger (85), the triple (87) receives +12v from a fused wire to the battery (30), and 86 is ground to the chassis. I found the new aftermarket honda motors don't use the wiring colors mentioned in all of the writeups, likely due to the generic vs OEM unit. Also, it's NOT a '91 honda wiper motor. '91 was the last year of one generation and the motor you want is from a '92 to '96 civic or '94 to '01 integra, part #76505-SR3-A01. I ordered a $40 generic unit off ebay and it came with the hardware needed and the shaft was notched like the OEM wiper so no grinding to it was needed. The wiper mount still needed grinding, approximately where my squiggly line is. The heat shrink colors match the generic wiper wiring colors and the connector pic is from zcardepot with a slight enhancement to the colors. '74 early ----- Generic 92-96 civic 260z 94-91 integra wires Black ------------ Black Blue/Red ------ Red Blue -------------- Green Blue/Yellow -- Yellow Yellow ----------- White Blue/white ---- Not used TL;DR - install a relay and lube wiper pivots first, easier, quicker, cheaper.
  25. 1 point
  26. 1 point
    Made the parts for the battery tray area, need to welded in the last part. also finished the plates that will tie my new framerails to the old ones in the enginebay
  27. 1 point
    Hi guys, starting to build this bodykit, let me know what you guys think. Thanks
  28. 1 point
    @260det, thanks for that. I've got a few ideas going right now, going to do some prototyping and hopefully make some improvements. A few updates from recent activity. Earlier last year when I rebuilt the gearbox I replaced the factory transmission mount isolator with the 240sx unit. The only modification required was drilling two holes in the crossmember. This Megan racing mount came on one of the 240sx boxes I got, and is a bit more robust than a ZX unit. The engine mounts tore again, so I ordered some OEM Nissan mounts from japan. The OEM mounts immediately delaminated on installation, so I ordered up some silver project mounts and they work just fine on the stock ZX. They are a bit stiff at idle with the cam, but while driving I can't tell the difference. Took the opportunity while everything was apart to finally fit on my #5 bypass, should help flow at the back of the head at least a little bit. AN to BSP fitting was easy enough to source. The throttle body heater cap was also leaking, so it was a good time to re-seal that. The front sway bar was also binding due to some janky drifting stuff I did to get more clearance for the brake calipers at full lock. Steering is much more complaint now, as it should be. Went to Thunderhill East this weekend and got on track for my first lap, engine was misfiring and I get black flagged for oil smoke in only a few laps. The driveshaft munched up the transmission output shaft seal, and it sprayed fluid all over the exhaust causing the smoke. I suspect it was due to the old failed engine mounts, but I'll find out for sure if it fails again. The parts shop in town had the required seal, I also got a coil and spark plugs to combat the misfire. I missed a few sessions, but I got it back on track with no leaks and running better than it has in a while. Set a 2:16.030, at least at a similar pace as the rest of the run group. The water temps get too hot after just 4 laps flat out, as mentioned previously in the thread I'll have to start doing something about this. A while ago I had adjusted the water temp enrichment table in the ECU to go very rich when the CHTS detects 240 degrees, and it worked great. At just about 230 on the gauge and it goes rich so I'm not tempted to keep pushing it.
  29. 1 point
    Wheels for setting up your car 😉 The items pictured are more like hub stands as they don't resemble wheels It goes something like this - jack car up - wheel off's - bolt hub stand's to hub's in place of wheel's - lower onto corner weight scales/set up patch - give it a good shake to settle the suspension - adjust away to your hearts desire, without having to fight your way around the wheel that's normally in your way
  30. 1 point
    oh wow sometimes i can be such a neanderthal i swear. Found the source of my supposed 'rod knock' ... a nice 1/8" hole under the #2 air smog pipe that connects all the exhaust runners on the manifold together, like i cant believe i didn't even stick my hand around that area to quickly check for a leak. Heh though i don't regret checking the rod bearings and i certainly don't regret cleaning the filthy oil pan, all's well that ends well thanks everyone!
  31. 1 point
    Welcome Very interesting. Mark's build is probably along the same lines or the project ardvark build. The reason I think people restore the rusty frames are to have the all important VIN number which allows registration and insurance. Kit cars without a VIN of sorts can be difficult to get certified for insurance or road use. If it is a track only toy then the requirements are much less, granted I think some places still want VINs for insurance purposes even for race cars. Would be interesting, 350z's are pretty affordable, and if you could find a way to use the sub frames and such and the stock suspension pickup points the list of benefits would be pretty neat. The problem then would be you are basically building a lighter 350z with a body kit. Mark has a very modified power plant and suspension setup, and the project aardvark has similarly extensive modification, but for drift usage. I'm not sure how the car would be running 350z geometry in a shorter wheel base with a different balance and different weight. Will be interested in what you come up with!
  32. 1 point
    If you're asking that question, you can't do it. Either spend a ton of money having an auto fabrication shop doing all the work for you, or change your mind on doing it. If none of those options are suitable for you, then spend hours and hours learning to fabricate and pour over other peoples build threads until you can find enough similarity in swapping some engine into a Subaru, and swapping an RB engine into something that normally doesn't have one.
  33. 1 point
    In 2002 I started a collaboration with John Radevich of JCI in Dallas, Texas. The goal was to build my 1977 280Z into a daily driver using an LS1 and T56. Ya search of "LS1 / T56 Update" will give a lot of the history of that project that resulted in one of the first S30's on the road with that combination in June of 2003 and a conversion component kit sold worldwide by JCI. Since then over 16 years and about 45,000 miles have passed. The car has been raced on quarter mile tracks, done the combination oval and infield at Texas Motor Speedway, done autocross work and a hillclimb. In between those fun events it has been my fair weather daily driver. The move from Texas to Washington state eliminated winter driving due to the corrosive deicing material used by WSDOT. Could it have been done better? Back then, probably not, but today definitely so. I'm happy to see all the aftermarket equipment available for these cars. I used to only shop at Motorport Ajuto in Orange, CA (zcarparts.com) for my bparts but with the drivetrain conversion my world was opened up to Arizona Z Car, Techno Toy Tuning, Silvermine and so many others. Every year that has gone by has seen the development of quality parts and systems for these cars - like zledslights.com down in Weslaco, TX and Dapper Lighting with their LED lighting conversions and Braille for their great Lithium Ion lightweight batteries IMG_4214.MOV IMG_4214.MOV . One thing that has remained constant, however, is the quality of the designed parts and equipment provided by JCI during that project so many years ago. To this day I have not had issue with any component designed by them. Thanks John, you did well for me.
  34. 1 point
    Well I don't see a reaction disk in there.... Edit: also based on the crustynes of the booster and the fact that i can get one from autozone for under $100 with tax and shipping I plan to just replace it.
  35. 1 point
    Hey sorry for the slow reply. Didn't get notified that anyone replied. Since I have Koni struts, I went with Koni's own bump stop. Part number 70.34.95.000.0 I agree with you. Some of those poly bump stops aren't any different than not having bump stops at all.
  36. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  37. 1 point
    1978 280Z Turbo Rebuilt L28ET 300ZX ECU reprogrammed by Jim Wolf Technologies- 91 Octane only Mustang Cobra Mass Air Flow Sensor 4-Piston toyota caliper front Disc brakes. Rear has original brakes. 5-Speed tranny with R-200 rear Tokicos 5-way adjustable shocks Front Mount intercooler Manual Boost Controller Turbo timer Reupholstered seats All new window seals Newer carpet Alpine Stereo -clean title Asking $16,000 OBO The headlight/wiper switch and Speedometer are not working speedometer stuck @85,xxx. No head liner. No A/C 323 717 Fifty Eight Forty. Text me if you have any offers or questions
  38. 1 point
    Searching facebook never works that well for me. I love forums.
  39. 1 point
    ++1 Fel-Pro. 9 years since build with no leaks!
  40. 1 point
    "the nipple won't stop bleeding" doesn't make sense. What do you mean? Maybe you could rephrase the question. It does sound painful though...
  41. 1 point
    Seems like threads should require moving to the FAQ by a mod though... But yeah, the post was curious. Seemed almost spam-like. "Dude, your answer is in your question".
  42. 1 point
    No. Had bought one, sold it. Now looking for another.
  43. 1 point
    Bawfuls Toyota booster swap should be considered for a sticky.
  44. 1 point
    Yeah HLS30... That's not JDM usually. He might have bought it in Japan, but for the US market, who knows. There's few records. We'd need the full vin to be able to realy search anything. HLS30-004xxx would be an earlier car, but could be a 260z too. If you get us a picture of the Vinplate it'll tell even more since we'd be able to see what the engine is supposed to be etc. That being said, if it's sitting in boxes, then it's a project with no real worth other than parts (I need a decent dash ) until you put it together. Download the FSM off xenons30 and go from there. only you can tell us what you have. We can give you estimates based on what you tell us but until then it's just conjecture. We will be able to tell you what goes where and a general process for putting it together. Obviously we're not going to be able to do it for you, nor would we want to. But don't be thinking you're sitting on a gold mine, unless your car has some really rare parts, such as anything that says 432 on it. Hagarty can help you with insuring it even while it's a project, so you might look into that. Otherwise give us more pictures, We are a hungry lot and a picture is worth 1000 words. Phar
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    Move this post to the "Engine Components/EMS/Megasquirt" Forum and look for "Chickenman" and/or "softopz". Chickenman does remote setups and tuning for a modest fee.
  47. 1 point
    Where to start? There is so many possibilities, I'm sure I can come up with a few for you but I'll start with this one, this is a mod I wish the factory would have done, there would have been a lot less rust in the rear of the Z's'. I just welded a 4" lip to the rain gutter on both sides, now instead of water pooling on the back deck lid it runs right off.
  48. 1 point
    Concur 100%. In my experience across several states, Zs only have a chance at truly being competitive in FP. Other classes will have cars that we can't keep up with, if they show up. It's never fun to be the only car in your class and "win." Like all forms of racing, one must maximize class allowances to allow the driver a chance to compete. The S30 just isn't a platform for competition against a modern car. It is however that platform that connects driver to the road most directly. Our Zs are among the most exciting cars to autocross in terms of adrenaline for this reason. Racers with faster times get out of my Z hooting and hollering. I'm with Jon. I target competing against a few cars or drivers. I prefer to have a passenger than drive alone. Why hog the adrenaline? Get in! I pursue excitement. I feel like I win, because I'm driving my dream car since I was 17. And that's my best victory, really. FWIW.
  49. 1 point
    Ding, ding, ding. On the L28ET the bypass is in the sandwich plate for the oil cooler and the block is plugged.
  50. 1 point
    Traced all the wires from the ignition and the TIU and it looks like it's a deadend box just like the voltage regulator which I've already removed. Since all my wires are ready to go from the directions in the JTR book, I think it's safe to keep the TIU box out of the loop. Thanks for the help guys. Also, kudos to to a guy (wal280z) over on classiczcars.com who recreated the wiring diagram for a 77 280Z using autocad. I was able to print out a full size version in grayscale to have in front of me and also had the hires image in color on my screen to refer to. Made it a lot easier to follow. And full size means I had to tape together 12 pages of printout (49" across). Well worth the extra time to do that.
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