Jump to content
HybridZ

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/10/04 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
  2. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone that purchased a piece of apparel in the fundraiser to help @SuperDan with operating costs for the site! We sold a total of 88 shirts with a resulting profit of $1202.19, which I just sent 100% of to Dan. It won't show as a donation because I sent it via friends and family to ensure every penny made it to him. This should cover the site's costs for about 6 months. Moving forward, I'll be doing an annual apparel sale with 100% being donated towards operating expenses. Each year we'll do a different promotional item since many of you now have several HybridZ shirts in your closet! Looking forward to hearing your ideas on what you'd like to see along with the shirts. Hats, beanies, keychains, stickers, etc all come to mind.
  3. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  4. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  5. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  6. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  7. 2 points
  8. 2 points
    Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
  9. 2 points
    I know everyone knows this already but 250hp/300ft-lbs is handled easily by the stock R200 long nose. Until the 8.8 became the hottest topic, the long nose R200 was considered just fine for all mild V8 swaps and some fairly upgraded ones too. Drag racers have run the R200 well into the 11s without issue (other than the lack of LSD options/ratios).
  10. 2 points
    Machine work finished! I can relax a little:) Just got done with their first bath. Still need de-buring and edge finishing but the majority of the work is done. The VCT holes are drilled and tapped but they haven’t been drilled all the way through. Easily opened up with a drill if needed. The head has provisions for three sub plates. Timing chain idler, upper tensioner and a slack side guide pivot. The idler and tensioner are connected to the oil system and o-ringed. It is getting really crowded in there with all the oil passages, head bolts and cam tower bolts. Next stop vacuum resin impregnation.
  11. 2 points
    Ready for battle! Getting geared up to start machining the heads. Officially the first production run.
  12. 2 points
    With all do respect newzed you have contrbuted nothing new to the solution of the problem that I had not already addressed many weeks back with DSS. I may not be using terms that agree with you.... I said “bind and won’t turn” and you prefer “won’t spin”. Your suggestion of filing off a dust cap is impossible as we are talking about solid billet machined parts that are meant to be to spec. You just can’t take a file to this stuff and call it good and I don’t own a lathe. I purchased these parts at great cost per DSS selling them as bolt on and in regularly use on many S30 Z’s. They have since admitted that they have NEVER had this stub axle on 240Z and admitted that there stub axle was previously copied off of an unknown Datsun stub axle they were told was an S30. I have supplied them all of the measurements using my mics and calipers for the risers so the bearing would fit per spec. Unfortunately, the first riser was not machined to measurements I provided so they did them a second time, this time per my measurements and they are perfect. Great, however the billet machined shoulder then cam into contact with the housing and again would not spin. Soooooo I sent them a stock 240Z OEM stub axle along with their axles with the understanding that DSS would machine into the billet stub axle the proper recess and width allowing the stub axle to fit as OEM with the stock stamped dust cap. DSS sent the axles back to me with shoulder machined down but without the necessary recess. I called them concerned they still would not fit however, per their instructions, bolted them back up as they were “within .005 tolerance of OEM”. I bolted them back up and they continue to press against the housing and will not spin. I called DSS with the bad news and they said “sorry, we didn’t think the recess was that important”. My response was “why didn’t you just machine the axle to match the OEM one I sent”? There Response- “Im not sure i need to talk to the machine shop”. As of this afternoon, DSS has requested I send it all back one more time and they will make it right. I’m going to give them that opportunity again as I am to far into this to just turn back. So, after month of emails, pictures, and sourcing hardware to fit (since the supplied hardware hits the differential on the adapter side of this conversion) I am again hoping that DSS machines these stub axles to OEM spec. Keep in mind, this is advertised as a “bolt in no modification kit”. Im really not offended that I’m not making sense to you. I’m offended and ticked off that I was sold a product that has never actually been bolted on to a 240Z and that I have been patiently (admittedly sometimes not so) trying to help them produce a useable product from the other side of the U.S with phone calls emails and pictures. The final straw is sending them an OEM axle with the instructions “make a copy of this” and it still came back machined wrong. Every point you have made regarding bearings and risers and clearance I agree with fully and in fact I communicated to them to fix those issues as they arose. It’s been a long process. I’m sorry I can’t satisfy your deepest need for every piece of communication and I honestly can’t tell you why they keep getting it wrong. Funny thing is, they can’t explain it either, but they sure as heck are not blaming me. Lee thanked me for my patience with all of DSS mistakes. Getting into a war of words is not my bag. I’m bummed out this crap is clogging up the forum. I apologize if I offended you. I’m really just a hard working guy that loves Z’s and gearhead culture in general. I’ve been building and racing for most of my 50 years of life (first kart and motorcycle age 5) and building cars in my garage is my therapy..... supposed to be fun. Given all my frustration with this purchase, i just needed a place to vent and I really want others to avoid the same. So hearing that I’m a whining complainer that doesn’t know what the hell he is saying and is incompetent to turn a wrench hits where it hurts to be perfectly honest. Agree to disagree is cool with me, time to let this squabble go. With respect, Jim
  13. 2 points
    Just installed 5mm flat bar at the bottom of Lancer EVO8 Recaro seat. I need to drill a adjustment hole on the original seat rails.
  14. 1 point
    Hey guys, after a 6 year hiatus I am returning with yet another Z project. Going full tilt this time, LS, and effing turbo. Found a '75 that has been sitting for 25 years.
  15. 1 point
    I honestly think these parts are pure bling....which is ok....but I don't see any performance improvement they would provide at all.... It seems to me there would be more benefit if they designed a part that tied together the rear control arm bushings, since they sit out somewhat cantilevered away from the body, I could see where there would be relative movement between them when loads are introduced. Even then, the benefit would be minimal, since the TTT conversion already has the "dog bone" tying them together. It would primarily be lateral movement rather than fore and aft movement, and these TTT parts seem designed only to address the fore and aft. As someone else mentioned, the control arm bushing mounts are tied pretty solidly together fore and aft by the control arms themselves. I think TTT knows that if they crank out cool, machined, anodized aluminum parts that bolt right into place, people are going to buy them just for the bling alone....without really thinking through whether there will be actual performance benefit. IMHO, these parts are a perfect example of that. I could see some appeal if the replacement front cross-member was at least designed to facilitate a dual exhaust....but it isn't.
  16. 1 point
    Thx to nice people on this forum, I found wat i needed! John Meyer you rock. Thx again John. Joost
  17. 1 point
    The shop is finally finished. At least as far as the county is concerned. The inspector just signed off on the final inspection!!! Time to get back to work on the Velo Rossa.
  18. 1 point
    Posting from another forum by the user sfm6s524. I am the seller. You guys can ask questions here or contact me by etsy as i check that more. Original etsy listing here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/668444381/datsun-240z-260z-280z-sun-visor-bracket?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=car+sun+visor&ref=sr_gallery-1-5&frs=1 On a 71 240 Z I have, the piece that holds the sun visors in place that mounts beneath the rear view mirror, broke on the drivers side. It was pretty annoying having the visor flop around, and I finally took the visor off until I could locate a replacement part. Searched all over the place for another, no luck. Finally saw one on Etsy from a person who has a 3D printer named PlasticWiz, figured I'd give it a try. Removed my old one, which basically disintegrated while trying to pop it loose from the vinyl covered roof frame. Sanded the new ABS piece a bit and painted black. I suppose the "print lines" could be removed completely with a lot of work, but for this car I just wanted a functional piece. Here it is mounted ready to pop in the rear view mirror. I've never used a 3D printed part on any of my cars, but I must say this really did the trick for a difficult part to find. Anyway, just thought I'd post this since I couldn't find any recent help on this part. I may order another for my other Z just in case...
  19. 1 point
    Seems like threads should require moving to the FAQ by a mod though... But yeah, the post was curious. Seemed almost spam-like. "Dude, your answer is in your question".
  20. 1 point
    Here's a little better markup. I am asking for the length of the yellow lines I've drawn in.
  21. 1 point
    Don't lie @cgsheen, you just find it as hilarious as I do watching Jeff perform the same job 3 times. 😂
  22. 1 point
    No its just a step up for the barb you should be fine.
  23. 1 point
    SN005 posted this on Church of L group on face book. He's happy:)
  24. 1 point
    You want to do the exact opposite to this taller driver who had to get an extension to keep the wheel close enough with the pedals as far away as practical. For mine it was all about getting the seat and driver back for better weight distribution.
  25. 1 point
    If you measured 9 volts on one of the wires that is about right (actually it's low but it should still run your pump), with the voltage drop from the starter. You tested the pump and it works. That leaves the ground. Edit 2 - rethinking the 9 volts. That's pretty low even with the starter draw. Seems like the battery needs charging before further testing. It's not really clear why you were measuring continuity when all you needed was voltage and ground. If you disconnect the yellow wire at the starter solenoid you can get power to the pump without the engine turning over. The fuel pump will get power at Start but the starter won't. Makes it easier for testing. You can hear the fuel pump.
  26. 1 point
    The car has only been out twice since the V8 swap, and this course was much more favorable to the high hp rear drivers so there was a lot more high rpm/rev limiter stuff going on. But yes, this is the first time this has happened. Course was about even right to lefts, maybe a few more rights, but not a lot more.
  27. 1 point
    It's an old car that looks cool. Some people buy them just to have them in the garage, and never actually drive them. If you're looking for a daily driver, read through the many threads on this site to see what's involved in keeping them running. Looks like you should plan on having two cars for a while. Ideally, the other will be a truck so that you can haul parts, like engines and transmission. And expect to spend some money. Nickels and dimes will add up quickly. If it didn't need time and money he probably wouldn't be selling it. Lastly - do you like your neighbor now? Because you're going to find all of the "previous owner" stuff he did. Or he might be hanging out all the time pining over his old car.
  28. 1 point
    Moving along now. Welded the bung for the removable steering wheel. Finished up the Nascar bars and lower rear valance replacement. Cleaning up older welds, sandblasting doors and hood. The next step is mocking up the doors. I bought used factory hinges so the doors can open rather than be removed, faster in the pits this way. After doors, hatch and hood are mocked up and working well its on to the suspension so we know what to do with the fender flares.
  29. 1 point
    VCT Plumbing Got the hardlines mostly done for the intake phaser control. Went well just tedious and time consuming. The bottom two lines are advance and retard and the top two lines are returns. The center is the feed. They are 5/16 OD which gives me an ID that closely matches the Honda circuit. It started off easy and then I remembered that an alternator needed to sit in there. That made things a little more interesting. The bulkhead fittings worked out great. I chose to use soft aluminum tubing for the interior lines. I knew routing them was going to be a bitch and I wasn’t wrong. Looks a little rough but it will work. Non of the fittings are compressed yet. I’ll lock everything down during the final assembly and then tweak everything so they have clearance. Feeding through the caps turned out to be a better way to go than through the tower bases. I had to redesign the EDIS coil bracket since the valve was now in the way. It’s not as hidden as it used to be but when the throttle bodies and stacks are on it should be buried pretty well. I’m super glad I went this route with the VCT valve. The look of it is exactly what I wanted and he hard lines fit the whole theme of the build. Lots happening over the next few weeks as I try and finish it up and get it back in the car.
  30. 1 point
    What no pics! Did you take break for awhile?
  31. 1 point
    It was carb related, I still don't know what happened but the Holley was flooding the left bank of the dual plane intake, flooding 3/5/2/8 (by memory) which are fed by the left side of the intake. I stole the Edlebrock 1407 off my '62 Galaxie and she fired right up and ran great. I've been through the Holley 4 times and can't figure out what is up, warped metering block, something crazy, I replaced every part to no effect. Might get one of these if I can't find what's up with Holley https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-m08600vs I think the spark issue was just the plugs starting to foul. I always assumed the timing light would fire when on a wire even if the plug wasn't sparking, someone set me straight on that. All ignition efforts were unrelated but we have a new cap and rotor. The Holley is messed up that's for sure. The old girl wants to rip it up with the Edlebrock on there, although I suspect it's too much for this motor being a 700cfm carb but it'll get the groceries home anyway until we can either sort the holley or find a replacement.
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    Nissan Altima coupe. Pulled the entire rear bumper cover, cut the lower section off then narrowed it to fit the lines of the Z.
  34. 1 point
    Fit what? Always provide the make, model, year and any modifications for your car when asking questions. Welcome. The answers to your questions will be found in the various forums. Suggestions: Download a Factory Service Manual (FSM). Download electrical schematics for your car. PDFs are easier to read than those found in books. Some are in color. Buy the book How to Restore Your Datsun Z Car by Wick Humble. It will save you hours of searching for "how to" info. Focus on searching Hybridz as 99% of questions have already been addressed. Start bookmarking Z car parts suppliers - there are many! Remember these are 40 year old cars and will need restoration to be safe and drivable. Join ClassicZCars.com website and search there as well. Become well informed about modifications before asking questions. People will be more inclined to answer informed questions. Search the forums. Read the new member FAQs. Useful Links: http://zhome.com/ http://www.classiczc...com/index.html/ http://www.zcarparts.com/ http://www.arizonazcar.com/ http://www.jagsthatrun.com/index.html
  35. 1 point
    I think part of the reason I spend so much time here is that I enjoy the spirit of the board. The "there is no best" rule comes to mind. There really isn't, depending on your geographic location, your skill level, your support group, the best is highly variable. Throw in things like the activity and we find a different "best" emerges for each one and at that point there is no best. I think once you grasp that you realize on the other hand, there is no worst, something really might be an option for someone given their walk in life. You apply that to real life and to hate a group of people or to blindly follow another just isn't an option. I love the ridiculously intricate discussions we can have. I even enjoy it when people argue even with me. Maybe not in the moment, as it is hard to look at where someone is coming from, to peel back the red or to calm your heart rate when someone points out you are wrong or has a vastly different opinion, but I think being able to calm down and maybe adopt someone else's perspective for a moment is something I learned on this board and am deeply thankful for. Also you have to realize when people argue with you it means they care, maybe not for you, but they care about the topic enough to take a moment out of their day to point something out. Sometimes it isn't welcome for sure, but I think in the context of the forum where we refer to the FSM, diagrams, charts, tables, and manuals I appreciate that there are people who care who take the time to interject and even spend the time to back up their opinion whether I agree with it or not. Just knowing that there are people who aren't just mindless dolls puts a smile on my face as silly as that may be.
  36. 1 point
    I got a headliner from the Z store.com and you're right it was quite thick. Had to trim about an inch on the sides and the back because it was a little oversized. Also I thought I could be safe with the spray-on adhesive and not get it everywhere so I didn't tape off the upper vinyls and yes I ended up getting glue everywhere haha. But I used a clean cloth and that stuff called Goo Gone and it came right off no problem... I did however cover my up my seats with a old bed sheet. I used SEM gloss black vinyl paint on the new headliner and it look'
  37. 1 point
    I went to fabric shop bought some thin foam and black marine vinyl. You can take your old as a stencil and make it a bit bigger you have about half an to an ich where you can pinch it in. Mine came off my roof wasnt clean and used a weak adhesive.
  38. 1 point
    Actually, it was the whole Tune that was just not very good. I did a Remote Tuning session with Brett and built him a new Tune from scratch . It's running fine now. There is a problem with noise on the Coolant sensor, but we are addressing that. Idle issue was actually due to very poor VE and Spark Maps. Large jumps between adjacent RPM and Kpa cells were one of the big issues. There is no Sync loss now with new Tune. Another happy Customer
  39. 1 point
    Hey there! That's exciting to hear about the block and the hatch. The hatch has been growing on me, but I haven't put the stock hatch on it yet to compare! I had actually heard that about the TC rods, and was going to get the OEM rubber bushings for that! Scary stuff... And it totally looks like all the wiring in the car will have to be addressed at some point. Its functional for now, but not elegant by any stretch of the imagination. I'm not great w/ electrical stuff, so I'll likely be enlisting the help of others with that! I look forward to continuing this build! Thanks again for the info!
  40. 1 point
    If he doesn't get back to you, you may want to look into this https://hokeperformance.squarespace.com/store/l-series-6spd-transmission-adapter-03-06-vq35de
  41. 1 point
    Car is sold. Thanks to everyone for the interest.
  42. 1 point
    I can see how those pedantic details are germane to a discussion about a V8 rally/safari inspired build like the one the OP is building. Oh wait, no I can't. OP, you want to see something RIDICULOUS? Take a look at the bolt in roll bar that they used in those old works cars. I was ROFL when I saw one for the first time...
  43. 1 point
    You can use whatever gas you tune it for. But there is a reason turbo cars usually run higher octane fuel.
  44. 1 point
    This is how you lift a head off with a helper. Installation is the reverse of removal. Note assistant was present to photodocument the process. This really should be put in the FAQ, the pictures make it so much clearer, huh?
  45. 1 point
    Hell- if you willing to spend that money , buy one of Datsun Works heads and something truly special
  46. 1 point
    Hi Guys, there is big differances with CVs. If parts wern't heat treated they would self destruct in no time. My kit is priced the way it is as I only use good quality parts. This is the CVs I use in my kit. http://www.rcvperformance.com/product-details.aspx?sku=301174M-28M As you can see they are $265.00 each that's almost a 1/3 of the cost of my kit. http://www.modern-motorsports.com/datsun-240z-280z-complete-cv-axle-conversion.html Joe
  47. 1 point
    Best to start a new thread for this as not to clutter up his build thread
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    ...Or "skimp" Scrimps are delicious, though.
  50. 1 point
    I don't post here often, but as owner of FutoFab I thought I would chime in about the FutoFab STi conversion stub axles. FutoFab purchased the WCR stock after Todd Walrich passed. Part of this stock included the Beta Motorsports / John Williams designed stub axles. We also heard about breakage issues on those axles and decided if we were to carry on with STi stub axles, they would be made by a driveline shop from axle forgings, not machined from billet stock. We felt using an axle forging for our stub axles would improve the quality in 2 key areas. 1) The flange being forged onto the shaft allows the grain of the steel to "flow" into the flange rather than be cut as it would be when machined from a billet. 2) The heat treating on our forgings is done to the shaft only. Heat treatment penetrates roughly .20" to .25" into the surface of the metal. The treatment depth leaves the core of the shaft untreated, making it more flexible. While heat treating adds strength, it also makes steel more brittle. Because heat treatment will fully penetrate the thinner flanges, we prefer to use forgings with untreated flanges. Since we have changed to using forged shafts, we have not had a failure reported to us. Dave Patten, Owner
×
×
  • Create New...