Jump to content
HybridZ

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/17/18 in Posts

  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  3. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  4. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  5. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  6. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  7. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  8. 1 point
    Well after loosing interest in my previous car (2008 corvette ls3). I wanted to get something pre smog and ended up getting a early 74 260z roller. Was essentially a bare roller but cleaning the floors up was already done so a great starting point. 2 months later had it on the road with a lq4, ls3 heads, boost cam, a sprinkle of nitrous and a t56. My main goal with the car was to just build something that was a blast to drive and it does that well. So far been to a couple 1/2 mile events, been to the 1/4 a handful of times. Still need to do a road course event and maybe try out a drift event with it.
  9. 1 point
    Hello Hybridz Members! Three piece spoiler for Datsun s30 240z 260z 280z Product is made from fiberglass with a flat black primer finish. Hence, spoiler is not a finished product ready for paint. This spoiler has 2 mount holes in center piece and 2 on each individual corner. It also has 2 threaded inserts in center piece and 1 on each individual corner.Quality and fitment are really good, all spoilers are brand new and never installed. some modification might be needed for perfect fitment. Price $280 shipped! - I can provide a discount for a group buy (5 minimum) Item ships from California* Local pick up available Payment: Paypal or cash for local pick up Any questions please feel free to send a PM
  10. 1 point
    You're going to want to bleed the system afterwards, so it's really not worth worrying about trying not to lose brake fluid during the conversion to coilovers. (Unless you leave the entire system intact, and hanging on hangers during the conversion, as Leon suggested.). Also a good time to replace your soft lines, if necessary, as Jon Mortensen suggested....consider replacing the stock rubber soft lines with steel braided lines, as well.
  11. 1 point
    The amount of help on here is extraordinary. I appreciate all the advice, I'm doing as suggested and picking up some books, but mainly diving into other builds more. I'm also trying to take smaller bites, or at least take a section on at a time so I don't end up with the "Paralysis by analysis" bug. I decided to just take my time/and tear it down to frame.. get it blasted then primed in 2k, which will allow me to make any adjustments during the 2jz/(154 or CD009) . Thanks again for the advice guys..
  12. 1 point
    Here's the latest on the bracket saga. I tried three sets sourced by Summit Racing, and when the third set (made by Grove) was going to hit stuff, I bit the bullet and fabricated (actually, I modified the last set I got). The folks at Summit were super about the returns, but when the third set didn't work, I felt embarrassed. After all, three times! I used 1/4-inch aluminum plate to make the modified parts, and used as many parts as I could of Grove's stuff. The compressor is off now, but with both in place, I measured and measured, and I am now certain--well, almost certain--that these will work. Here are some photos.
  13. 1 point
    thanks D9inger!!! that is one bueatiful engine.
  14. 1 point
    It's been a while since I've anything done to my car due to life getting in the way, however I made an effort to save some money and get some Fab work done. So far thanks to the great guys at Kaizen works here in New Zealand an R33 rear subframe has been mounted into my 280zx with custom mounting points fabbed up but everything else is standard R33 at this point. Now we are waiting for my RB gearbox to be adapted to the L series block so the car can head back for custom engine and trans mounts to be made.
  15. 1 point
    Well, I started down the path. We'll call it progress. Initial rough up and flame treat. The backing pieces were secured with plastic weld epoxy initially and then gone over with alternating layers of the g/flex 655 and West 105/207 and glass with sanding in between. If I had to do it over I would have just made some 90 degree brackets with thin metal and epoxied those on added rigidity. And what it looked like before the finish cuts for the gauges. Between all the layers, the back plates are probably between 1/8" -1/4" thick. Plenty sturdy enough for the gauges. Now I'm at kind of an impasse about how to secure it to the frame. Originally I had planned on using the factory mounting holes and putting tapped spacers in between the cap and the dash and then securing with a bolt. But, between the cover not fitting perfectly to begin with, and then slightly warping with the flame treat it's off enough that the glove box won't line up. I'm not concerned about the center panel since I was just going to make a flat plate there either way but the whole thing is pretty flimsy. I can heat again and probably get it close but it will involve adding a lot of support to get rid of the flex if I don't address the void. So, now I'm toying with filling the void between the cap and frame with expanding foam to help with the rigidity. But with that comes issues about making sure the alignment is dead nuts before the pour, making sure the materials are compatible and will bond, etc etc. Pain in the ass is what this is...
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Goodness I love this forum, you really can find everything. Quote from this thread: Pretty sure that is what happened. I measured what I did and found that I was sticking 13mm past the flange of the aluminum spacer at first, that caused the pre-load on the master and the exact symptom of the brakes coming on and staying on. Then on the side of the freeway I moved it down to 6mm past the flange and the car drove back with no problems. I have it currently set to 9mm which is in spec, but I will be checking for preload and complete release to make sure I don't run into problems again.
  18. 1 point
    Maybe try old school bleeding methods before the pressure bleeder. As Miles suggests there might be air in the MC. An air bubble might not get pushed out of the MC by a pressure bleeder if the MC is "nose up". Be the air bubble...where would you hide?
  19. 1 point
    The links jhm & calZ are great. For a street car what I have found is that if you strengthen the frame rails then do some basic strut bars the car is plenty stiff for your needs and if you want to a bit more then do some further bars just for the towers; this will avoid needing cage. If you do want to race you would just need a hoop but for street there is no need. I added some pics of my rails and others have done similar versions. I did another 240Z where we found great boxed rails that were thinner and fully boxed so we just welded that on the bottom and eliminated welding inside the car; easier and similar result. This way your car is more street and others driving with you will appreciate not being in a cage. I own a more caged Z as well but when you get older you will find women often do not want to be in a caged car, maybe just a hoop but nothing more...
  20. 1 point
    Good catch. Thank you for pointing that out.
  21. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  22. 1 point
    I appreciate the review of the brake pad materials. I'm curious why you have not gone to a vented front rotor? That's the main reason I am changing from stock S30 brakes, as I like to drive road courses and brake cooling seems to be important. My setup will be 280ZX front calipers with turned down Z31 front rotors and Maxima rear calipers with late S130 rotors; I am shooting for a 280ZX-type brake system, so I will also swap in the 15/16 MC and late S130 prop valve. I would like to report results this summer, but there is so much to do on the car...
  23. 1 point
    Yep thanks wiring is ok. I found the problem, the voltage meter got damaged/jammed by sandlast media going in there during restoration process.... Will try to find another gauge..... Thanks everyone for your help!
  24. 1 point
    1975 2 seater with what we call over here the Californian floor pans due to the provision of a bulge for the cat converter of the day and a very irregular metal pressing check back when I have the pans this isn’t as hard as it looks
  25. 1 point
    Lol yeah, I assumed as much. Figured on that first compression/decompression plastic ones would pop fairly quickly.
  26. 1 point
    I used the eastwood on my car. It has the consistency of water, so cover under the car when you spray it because it will start coming out of all the holes, seams, cracks, etc.
  27. 1 point
    The shop is finally finished. At least as far as the county is concerned. The inspector just signed off on the final inspection!!! Time to get back to work on the Velo Rossa.
  28. 1 point
    An example of what to avoid... the "AC" axles. It'll be on the tag, but this seller put it on the shaft as well.
  29. 1 point
    Went digging in the junkyard today with the CV spider in my pocket. Turns out the 02 explorer has the same diameter shaft ends... but courser splines. The good news is its a solid heat treated shaft and its the same thickness its whole length, necking down only for the splines. I also called moser and talked to them about sending in a core shaft and paying for two pairs of CV axle spline service and they're happy to do it so long as they look everything over and it seams like it works. Cutting the heat treating off the hollow shafts just wasn't sitting well with me. I also discovered that the two left shafts are different on the ends in diameter and one had a slightly smaller cv joint pair... I'm guessing i got one v8 shaft and the other from a v6 car. Both are splined the same into the housing and at the hubs... but one is stronger than the other with bigger cv joints. The left and right v8 shaft have the same size cv joints... its just the spare left shaft had some differences. Going back to the junkyard tomorrow to compare my cv joint to the explorer outer cv. If they are the same internally i plan on building a hybrid cv. But if they're different I'll pay for 2 pairs of spline service and know that I'll never have to worry about the strength of those shafts...
  30. 1 point
    Seems like threads should require moving to the FAQ by a mod though... But yeah, the post was curious. Seemed almost spam-like. "Dude, your answer is in your question".
  31. 1 point
    On the 528 BMW insert working on the 280z's, I got that info from a person that has been running rally races for 15 years in his 280. He is sending me info on all the suspension parts he buys to make his system work, front and rear. When I get that info, I will share what is pertinent. I know a good bit of his parts will need to be changed for stiffer springs and or different valving due to him running on dirt and me on asphalt with sticky tires.
  32. 1 point
    Joe called me yesterday to let me know my stub axles were from an earlier batch so no problem. How many company owners will do that for a customer? Thank you for your follow up Joe.
  33. 1 point
    Just sold last set, but I’m ordering a new batch. Ordered 12 sets, now all gone.
  34. 1 point
    Bawfuls Toyota booster swap should be considered for a sticky.
  35. 1 point
    Just went through the (many) pages of your build, looks great! Thanks for the insight.
  36. 1 point
    I think we should all hold from speculating until the vendor has had a chance to respond. I will PM you the contact information I have for Joe at Chequered Flag.
  37. 1 point
    Sounds great! Yeah, it does sound like an L series still somehow, that was my first thought as well. Cool that it's in a car that's a driver and not a garage queen too.
  38. 1 point
    SN005 posted this on Church of L group on face book. He's happy:)
  39. 1 point
    Probably the "reaction disc" in the booster. A common enough problem that it has an FAQ entry. http://forums.hybridz.org/topic/69706-reaction-disk-pictures-and-walkthrough/
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    JHM i have been looking through said diagram and it was a big help. Basically I compared the 240 vs 260 and what is actually in my car and was able to get everything working. I now have 12V at the distributor EDIT: when the key is turned on! not all the cabin stuff seems to be working but I don't care because racecar and most of it is still waiting to come out. Yeah I am running my fan, light bar, starter, fuel pump and alternator with new wire/fuses/relays. I'll post it up when i get it done. First order of business is to charge the batter that is putting out 8.8V during cranking... If i actually get the motor to fire I will start the process if getting every looking nice.
  43. 1 point
    VCT Plumbing Got the hardlines mostly done for the intake phaser control. Went well just tedious and time consuming. The bottom two lines are advance and retard and the top two lines are returns. The center is the feed. They are 5/16 OD which gives me an ID that closely matches the Honda circuit. It started off easy and then I remembered that an alternator needed to sit in there. That made things a little more interesting. The bulkhead fittings worked out great. I chose to use soft aluminum tubing for the interior lines. I knew routing them was going to be a bitch and I wasn’t wrong. Looks a little rough but it will work. Non of the fittings are compressed yet. I’ll lock everything down during the final assembly and then tweak everything so they have clearance. Feeding through the caps turned out to be a better way to go than through the tower bases. I had to redesign the EDIS coil bracket since the valve was now in the way. It’s not as hidden as it used to be but when the throttle bodies and stacks are on it should be buried pretty well. I’m super glad I went this route with the VCT valve. The look of it is exactly what I wanted and he hard lines fit the whole theme of the build. Lots happening over the next few weeks as I try and finish it up and get it back in the car.
  44. 1 point
    Yeah HLS30... That's not JDM usually. He might have bought it in Japan, but for the US market, who knows. There's few records. We'd need the full vin to be able to realy search anything. HLS30-004xxx would be an earlier car, but could be a 260z too. If you get us a picture of the Vinplate it'll tell even more since we'd be able to see what the engine is supposed to be etc. That being said, if it's sitting in boxes, then it's a project with no real worth other than parts (I need a decent dash ) until you put it together. Download the FSM off xenons30 and go from there. only you can tell us what you have. We can give you estimates based on what you tell us but until then it's just conjecture. We will be able to tell you what goes where and a general process for putting it together. Obviously we're not going to be able to do it for you, nor would we want to. But don't be thinking you're sitting on a gold mine, unless your car has some really rare parts, such as anything that says 432 on it. Hagarty can help you with insuring it even while it's a project, so you might look into that. Otherwise give us more pictures, We are a hungry lot and a picture is worth 1000 words. Phar
  45. 1 point
    It was carb related, I still don't know what happened but the Holley was flooding the left bank of the dual plane intake, flooding 3/5/2/8 (by memory) which are fed by the left side of the intake. I stole the Edlebrock 1407 off my '62 Galaxie and she fired right up and ran great. I've been through the Holley 4 times and can't figure out what is up, warped metering block, something crazy, I replaced every part to no effect. Might get one of these if I can't find what's up with Holley https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-m08600vs I think the spark issue was just the plugs starting to foul. I always assumed the timing light would fire when on a wire even if the plug wasn't sparking, someone set me straight on that. All ignition efforts were unrelated but we have a new cap and rotor. The Holley is messed up that's for sure. The old girl wants to rip it up with the Edlebrock on there, although I suspect it's too much for this motor being a 700cfm carb but it'll get the groceries home anyway until we can either sort the holley or find a replacement.
  46. 1 point
    If you use the s12+8 calipers from the later years, they were machined to fit vented roters like the s12w ones but have smaller cylinders making for more of around 57% to 43%. This is what I run and am very happy with the setup.
  47. 1 point
    That "put it back where it was" suggestion is a bad one even for a diff that has a crush sleeve. The R200 has no crush sleeve. The spec is RFT, I want to say it's something like 150 - 200 ft lbs. I always use red loctite on the nut the put my impact on 5 and hit it, empty the compressor until it fills, then hit it again. Never had any issues.
  48. 1 point
    This thread really helped me out; I recently bought a '72 240 off of eBay. It was great but the drivers side door had to be slammed to the point of concern or it would not fully latch. From inside the car it was very difficult. After finding this thread in a bout of restlessness last night; I went to Lowes and bought a 36" piece of 3/8" PEX pipe. PEX is made from polyethylene and is pretty similar to nylon in hardness and low friction. I trimmed a 3/8" piece off and made one cut along the side. After submerging it in boiling water for a few minutes, I formed it around the 1/2" handle of the x-acto I used to cut it with. It snapped right on the contact lobe of the door latch. The door closes almost without effort now. 15 minutes for both doors and $1.60 in materials. No grinding.
  49. 1 point
    I've been there! I can't say how many times I've flown in to somewhere...opened up the local instruction manual, and started at Square 1... Customers don't want to see that. They want the Factory Guy to come in with a glamorous set of tools and diagnose some bizarre malady. The best was a vibration issue at a company in MO... I was there on the machine during overhaul...and now...three years later it was vibrating. Customer diagnosed it...I was there to reassemble. Long story short...they had sent the electric motor out for overhaul when it shorted phase-to-phase and after re installation their fears of compressor damage seemed justified in a high vibration trip that wouldn't go away. Puzzling to me was if I rotated the compressor by hand it was fine...then, sitting over the coupling pushing down on the 48" Pipe Wrench rotating it it came to me: normally I crawl onto the machine from the high speed side (opposite of what I was) and push down... I thought "I'm rotating this backwards!" I did my scroll check, then asked they get the manual, section 5, page 4 (standard standard, standard!) The motor company, despite marking everything for orientation, had reversed end bells of the motor. The customer did the rotation check, reversed leads, then had a vibration problem that just would NOT go away! They even said to me when I got there "it's strange, we an roll it in reverse and it's fine..." One basic check to the manual (which clearly said: "compressor rotation is clockwise viewed from drive end"!) and they would have never torn into a perfectly good machine. Nor had to pay for a field Balance! I flew across the country, assembled the machine, and in 45 minutes and one start diagnosed reversed end bells (improper rotation)... Later compressors had a big cast-in direction of rotation arrow...hmmmm wonder why? Most of the time it comes down to something very basic, but overlooked or dismissed. The head of maintenance sat there, looking at the book....and said "we probably did all this work for nothing then..." Yep! And balanced a field balanced rotor that made it imbalanced and needed another field balance to get it back where it was before you took it all apart! "D'OH!" Don't get discouraged, just step back...and then comeback with a fresh outlook and check it all again. You are right: a second set of eyes s invaluable when looking at this...it was JeffP and a case of Moosehead before he said "Man, your laptop's comm chip has some really funky signals coming out...let's try mine!" Badaboom! Fixed...for about 20 minutes and then my power circuit went DOA! Second box was fine and that box has been in there since!
  50. 1 point
    Traced all the wires from the ignition and the TIU and it looks like it's a deadend box just like the voltage regulator which I've already removed. Since all my wires are ready to go from the directions in the JTR book, I think it's safe to keep the TIU box out of the loop. Thanks for the help guys. Also, kudos to to a guy (wal280z) over on classiczcars.com who recreated the wiring diagram for a 77 280Z using autocad. I was able to print out a full size version in grayscale to have in front of me and also had the hires image in color on my screen to refer to. Made it a lot easier to follow. And full size means I had to tape together 12 pages of printout (49" across). Well worth the extra time to do that.
×
×
  • Create New...