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  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  3. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  4. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  5. 2 points
    Did it. Not a bolt on deal, but easier than a LS1 swap! Nobody here should be scared. rear parking hat brakes
  6. 2 points
    Well guys, I finally solved the issue - Since I got my car without any keys and ignition lock and switch, I had ordered a replica version on e-bay. Once it arrived I looked at the connector and the switch (5 pins,1 missing) and figured that it was all correct. I also checked the details in BE-26, with the B,S,A,IG pins, and the one not named in BE-26, marked as "R". Measured the signals and all seems correct. - After having run through the fuses, relais, and wires, i went back to the switch again. After studying the schematic below, I figured I better measure the signals with the connector in the switch. There I found out there was no voltage signal on the "S" with ignition on START. Checked the schematic below again, and found out that when I would swap out 2 wires in the connector, all would be fine. So thats what I did, I swapped the White Red wire, with a Black Blue one, and starter cranked up right away. Issue solved! So for people getting replica ignition switch watch out for this mix up between R and S. - btw, anyone know what the Black/Blue wire is for? as I have now switched that one in the ignition switch connector. Thanks for the help jhm! cheers, joost
  7. 2 points
    Here is a later pic with everything welded in, I think I did what you are recommending.
  8. 2 points
  9. 2 points
    Quite a few things wrong with that Tune. No wonder you are having issues with AE. Made some revisions to. 1: AE settings. No where near correct. Made several changes there that should be positive. 2: Target AFR table far too lean at low RPM. VE table greatly affects transition off idle. Going too lean creates a bog. With proper Ve Table, less AE is required. 3: You were running Alpha N. MS3 has a special Fuel algorithm for ITB's. I have enabled that. 4: Spark Table needed some work 5: I've noticed that you have your O2 feedback control disabled. I have enabled it but set proper settings and filters on it. Send me a PM with your E-mail address and I will send you a touched up Tune. This is just a Baseline . but should be an improvement. I also do Remote Tuning and offer full Tunes built for your particular engine specs.
  10. 1 point
    Thanks! A 240 tank would work fine too because I'm 85% sure I'm going to put a surge tank in anyway so having the baffles or larger flow may not be as necessary. It has been a challenge but we must soldier on. I'm open to options so I'll check them out. I did not. I think people with carbed cars like them because they come baffled from the factory so it's easier to convert to EFI.
  11. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  12. 1 point
    Hey guys, after a 6 year hiatus I am returning with yet another Z project. Going full tilt this time, LS, and effing turbo. Found a '75 that has been sitting for 25 years.
  13. 1 point
    It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
  14. 1 point
    Not much to report as the weather in the mid-west has been less than desirable. I got all of the drum brake parts removed and realized that my driver's side rear wheel bearing is starting to go bad. I attempted to use my slide hammer but have been unsuccessful with getting the stub axle removed. I'm waiting for a warmer day (anything above 50*) to take a space heater out there to warm up that area, blow torch it a bit, and then use the slide hammer again. Several parts arrived in January, which is always exciting. I snagged the AZC Mustache bar and brace used for about $250 less than retail. I was also able to find and buy a really clean finned diff cover, which pretty much completed the rear diff set up. At this point, it feels like I'll never have the rear end work done in time to drive the car in the spring, but I'll keep pushing through. I attached some pictures of the new parts below. I haven't mentioned this in my past posts, but I'm the outside sales manager at C&R Racing. I'm personally working on product development for many different platforms, including swapped S30s. The engineers and I are working on a dual pass set up that will work with both LS and RB/JZ swaps. I can keep everyone posted on that development in this thread.
  15. 1 point
    Dang I can't find the link from a couple years ago. I think I saw something on Kameari's website about reproducing new castings of the mk63 calipers. They had pics of the rough castings pre machining. I had to translate the japanese obviously. I can't find it on their site now. It was awhile ago though maybe it wasn't Kameari. Parts Assist M Speed has the new units though. I know I wasn't on their site when I saw the post about the castings from a couple years back. These were a factory Z, hako, caliper for vented rotor. I'd run these. Not sure what the "stock" rules mean in his class but the mk63's were the road racing caliper back in the day weren't they? (I don't know too much about the old factory race car setups from back in the day) I've always assumed the mk63's were the homologation brake for one of the lower sports car classes. https://www.rhdjapan.com/parts-assist-m-speed-mk63-4pot-caliper-brake-kit-s30-s31-b110-gc10-kpgc10-pgc10-kgc10-kpc10-pc10-gc110-gc111-gc210-gc211.html *I would ignore the rotor diameter callout in the RHD description. Also, found this on the "other forum" should be some info in here. https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/56999-looking-for-a-set-of-sumitomo-calipers-mk63/ Kameari should have a stock vented disc http://www.kameariengineworks.co.jp/Catalogue-v3/catalogue-075-20160731.pdf
  16. 1 point
    I was supposed to get the fuel hoses done, I ordered 5/8" and was sent 1/4" so I'm put off another week from finishing my fuel system. Still have plenty to do so next on the plan was to get the wiring done. This week I was able to get the rear section done. This is the first time I ever rewire a car and I think I'm doing pretty good from the condition the wiring was in before. I reused the old connectors with new terminals where I could instead of splicing new wires with old wires. It doesn't seem like a lot but it took a lot of time to research and plan what wires from the EZ harness goes into factory locations. Next week I'll have the front finished then may need help from a buddy to do the ignition and dash. I'm just saying, if I ever get rid of this car the next person will get a deal, the interior has been stripped, POR-15'd and Lizard Skin'd, new wiring and new interior ready to go in. And that's just a start. Video below, Subscribe if you don't mind. I'm working at getting better at making them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQTnTDAq1U8&t=9s
  17. 1 point
    Don't do this. Have patience, and spend more money (if necessary, vastly more money!) on a car with fewer problems. Otherwise you'll spend 5 years doing rust-repairs, 5 more years doing structural reinforcement, and 5 more years nursing your wounds after you realize in year 11 that new rust has already formed where you had replaced the old. Alternatively - and it sorely pains me to say this - look for a less rare, less rust-prone vehicle of comparable low weight... such as a Mazda Miata.
  18. 1 point
    Mpg depends largely on engine management: carburetor vs. fuel injection, camshaft profile and so forth. 20 mpg should be readily attainable even with a more aggressive engine build. However, truly high efficiency, in the sense of a modern sports car, will be hard to attain - even with the 240Z's weight advantages. The reason is lousy drag coefficient... the bane of good highway mileage. To answer your questions: 1. Do as little as possible, at least initially! Complete the swap, get the engine running and the car sorted out. Engine mods can come later. 2. This is entirely subjective and situational. So enterprising drag-racers are pushing 500-700 hp (or more!) without molesting the "stock" look. 3. Never, ever ever install a non-overdrive transmission in a "daily driver" Z! Your application is screaming for a T5. 4. Initially, do nothing. Between your relatively weak stock 350 and the stock wheels/tires, the R180 differential in your 240Z should be adequate. Later you can swap in the much stronger R200. Search the "drivetrain FAQ" for model years/varieties from which to swap the R200. The #1 discriminator between failure and success, is the condition of the Z that's about to become the swap candidate. Rust? Overall condition? How is the suspension? The brakes? Do things work in general? Are bits falling off? Rubber? Plastic? Doors close properly? Dents/body damage? Electrical systems? You're about to do an engine swap. Don't also make it a restoration. The #2 discriminator is falling into the "while I'm at it" malaise. Do as little as possible! Laziness is always its own reward, but sometimes it's also this best route to quick and definitive success. This is one such instance. Be strategically lazy!
  19. 1 point
    An example of what to avoid... the "AC" axles. It'll be on the tag, but this seller put it on the shaft as well.
  20. 1 point
    No. Had bought one, sold it. Now looking for another.
  21. 1 point
    In case it hasn't already been posted in this forum, there's now a Facebook group for GTO replica owners and fans: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GTORR/
  22. 1 point
    Have you read these yet? https://forums.hybridz.org/topic/38592-brake-balance-faq/ https://forums.hybridz.org/topic/38499-brake-upgrade-faq/ Well from personal experience I have done this set up and the front and rear brakes can not be balanced even with an adjustable proportioning valve. They work okay but this system is overly front biased resulting in the car pitching forward because the front brakes are overloaded and the rears aren't doing enough work. A braking system has to be engineered for the car, I think if you put the stock brakes back into perfect working order and get a set of sticky tires you would be surprised well the car stops. That or go all the way and install one of the Wilwood brake kits offered by TTT, ArizonaZcar or Silvermine.
  23. 1 point
    Don't lie @cgsheen, you just find it as hilarious as I do watching Jeff perform the same job 3 times. 😂
  24. 1 point
    Just to update: WHP advised me to try to torque the other stub axle per FSM specs and see if it would fail as well. And it did. Except I realized that my wrench only goes up to 150 lbs/ft so the initial failure was also at less torque than I thought. Anyway, this one didn't fail as spectacularly: I torqued to 150, then tried the hub resistance in 1/4 turn increments. On the 3rd or 4th try, the resistance fell of significantly and I thought the threads had stripped. Nope, it just split about half way into the nut so it was still partially threaded. They are supposed to be making a new batch and shipping me some.
  25. 1 point
    Oh yeah thanks for the reminder. I do have the original seats, if anyone wanted them. But the new seats are cooler
  26. 1 point
    For those that have been around a while may recognize me. Here is my last build related thread but most of the car is also documented in other threads on here: This one shows the custom LS engine mount Since the crash last year I have build an LS RX8 and am moving across the country soon so the Z parts unfortunately need to go. I have basically 10 years collection of Z stuff. As parts keep getting harder to find it would take a long time to piece all this together and fabricate all the custom pieces. At this point I dont have the time, energy, or patience to piece part out everything so am looking to see if anyone wants a LS race swap starter kit and all the spares I've accumulated over the years. There's a bunch of misc stuff I'm sure I have forgotten about but it includes every piece of Z stuff I own and used to campaign this car for a over a decade. 240Z front LCA w/ monoball installed Complete custom front/rear race brake package Custom pedal box converted to Tilton dual masters w/bias adjuster including cable 240SX rear brakes w/ fresh rotors and hawk pads Outlaw (also fits Wilwood) 4-piston calipers on front plus spare seals and hawk pads Fresh front rotors (single one day TT on them), two-piece higher end Wilwoods rings Fresh stainless lines (one race since replaced) Custom 3" front brake cooling hose backing plates Complete stock brake sytem in good shape (no booster) Rebuilt calipers/wheel cylinders Rotors in almost new shape Hawk front pads, performance rear shoes Aluminum drums with good friction surface but beat up fins Fresh master cylinder and old master cyl Stainless lines Custom rear 240Z LCA converted to a-arm w/ toe link (right side needs inspected/repaired) Custom sectioned/reinforced 280Z strut housings (right side need inspected or replaced) 5 Koni1437-Race strut inserts, all used but usable 240Z Koni gland nuts 280Z Koni gland nuts Custom gland nut tightening tool, allows tightening on car Old Tokico adjustable struts (chump/lemon worthy?) EMI bolt-in camber plates Coilover sleeves for both 240 and 280 strut tubes (two sets) Z appropriate mostly Hyperco springs - pair of 225, 250, 300, 375, 425, 500 Custom mustache bar to LCA braces "Ron Tyler" style custom front diff mount R200 Mustache bar 3.9 diff, good condition, needs cleaned and assembled 300ZX clutch style LSD not in housing, good condition 3.7 diff, rebuilt several years ago with all new bearings, w/ OBX that's now dead and stopped LSDing 3.54 diff, all new bearings w/ custom OS Giken with one season on it Inner stub axles, at least one set T56 to R200 custom Driveshaft Shop aluminum driveshaft (dented so I would replace the tube) Custom front crossmember turned into k-member w/ LS mounts & matching motor plates Stock steering rack Stock steering arms drilled for 5/8 rod end, matching custom tie rod arms w/ bump steer adjustment Short steering arms, unmodified 3/4" 'bumpsteer spacers' Stock T/C rod w/ Gman ball and socket pivot bushing Custom adjustable T/C rod w/ rod ends (one tube bent but is off the shelf coleman threaded tube) Sanderson LS swap 1.75" headers, ceramic coated Tilton clutch master cylinder and modified yoke to fit stock pedal box T56 throwout bearing quick disconnect line Complete long block L24, running when parked .... probably 25 years ago Rota Grid 17x8.5 gold rims Unknown 15" gold rims (came with car) w/ low mile but REALLY old dunlaps 15x10 diamond steel race rims black w/ used 275 R7 Hoosiers, tread usable for a track day Pair of NIB ZG flairs but not sure front or rear 240Z door glass and working mechanisms Great condition wiper motor 280Z stub axles w/ companion flanges 240Z stub axles w/ companion flanges Set of NIB front wheel bearings plus other random bearing and seals Front wheel bearing adjustable spacers (allows the nut to be tightened against a sleeve instead of relying on bearing preload) Several stock companion flanges Pair 280Z front hubs and pair of 240Z hubs 280ZXT CV axles w/ custom 240Z companion flanges (need boots replaced) 280ZXT CV axles w/ custom 280Z companion flanges (need boots replaced) 3 Stock half-shafts (I ran these without issue more than anything else) Misc diff rebuild shims, flanges, random spare bearing, etc Mono to Datsun steering wheel adapter Custom bracket that mounts panaramic race rearview mirror to stock location 280Z hood vents Inspection lids Good condition 240 dash, no cracks BUT has corners notched around the cage Stock front swaybar w/ custom end links (what I used) ST front and rear swaybars Front and rear set of adjustable inner control arm bushings Left taillight Lightened hood hinges Stock 240Z radiator Pair of stock 280Z rear LCA Pair of stock 240Z front LCA 160 mph speedo Urethane airdam with turn signals and custom dive planes Asking $4,500 for EVERYTHING. Wont ship and located in Decatur (central) Illinois 62521. PM me if serious and I can take and send additional pics.
  27. 1 point
    Mike @ Whitehead got back to me this morning ( Sunday- that's pretty solid customer service) and said they had a batch of 27 spline axles that had been annealed incorrectly and were all recalled. Mine was the first reported 39 spline failure but he sent them the pictures I took to see if it is a similar defect. If so, they'll probably replace them. I keep this updated.
  28. 1 point
    I think we should all hold from speculating until the vendor has had a chance to respond. I will PM you the contact information I have for Joe at Chequered Flag.
  29. 1 point
    You want to do the exact opposite to this taller driver who had to get an extension to keep the wheel close enough with the pedals as far away as practical. For mine it was all about getting the seat and driver back for better weight distribution.
  30. 1 point
    You're talking about an early S30 - 1970-1976, right? Not a '77-'78? The rotating mechanism in the earlies can get sticky over the years and the grease turns solid. A temporary fix is to lube the rotating mechanism on the outside of the door with some spray lube. Overdo it - turn by hand and release until it rotates smoothly and easily. The real fix is to take apart the door, remove the entire mechanism to completely clean and re-lube it before re-installing...
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    It's an old car that looks cool. Some people buy them just to have them in the garage, and never actually drive them. If you're looking for a daily driver, read through the many threads on this site to see what's involved in keeping them running. Looks like you should plan on having two cars for a while. Ideally, the other will be a truck so that you can haul parts, like engines and transmission. And expect to spend some money. Nickels and dimes will add up quickly. If it didn't need time and money he probably wouldn't be selling it. Lastly - do you like your neighbor now? Because you're going to find all of the "previous owner" stuff he did. Or he might be hanging out all the time pining over his old car.
  33. 1 point
    There's been a lot of good replies to your question of how to build your car. I wanted to share some hindsight from a number of projects I've been involved with over the years. In the end you'll decide if any of this is useful or not. 1. One of the toughest decisions you'll be faced with is do you want a street car that can tracked or a track car that's street legal. Those may sound like the same thing but they are from from it. The first involves adding performance using the Z chassis for the most part similar to the Green Hornet mentioned above. The latter is much more like building a chassis and dropping the Z body onto it. This gets you more to a car like the Fairlady Z06 mentioned above. This also determines if you start with a solid chassis or you use one that's nothing more than the roof and doors. 2. Research, research, research. I'm not trying to be funny but you need to have the entire build plan figured out before you start. Then create a checklist and start crossing of items. This research and list will help you build a budget for the car. It may end up being a lot more expensive than you imagine (nothing wrong there) and you may never want an SO to see this spreadsheet. But if you've done your research and stick to your plan you won't but parts two or three times to get the right item. It will also keep you from having to figure certain things out along the way, which really adds up time wise. And lastly it will keep you from having scope creep. The latter can be a real killer of projects. 3. Determine/buy the drivetrain parts last. This is engine, transmission, wheels & tires, etc. If your project takes more than a year to build it's often possible better items will come along or prices in scrap yards will get better. The only time I'd say you can break this rule is if you have determined their is a specific drivetrain you're going to use and it's not going to get any cheaper and in fact may be harder to get later on down the road (L28ET for instance). 4. For the things you can't do find a good professional that can help you. While it's often tempting to use a buddies buddy or someone doing this from their home I've seen a lot of projects get stalled this way. This is generally around body and pain but could also be around having a roll cage built. For any vendors you plan to use take a look around to make sure they have a good track record. I wish you luck and good fortune on building your car. In the end there's nothing better than something you built yourself, well at least to me. Cary
  34. 1 point
    Issue fixed, the connector on the yellow wire had also built up a good bit of corrosion. Sprayed some contact cleaning spray in there and plugged it in and it works. Thanks guys for sll the help.
  35. 1 point
    Look at the picture of the temperature sender. The "top" has come off - I could tell that from the black goo oozing out in your pictures. That black "wire" you're pulling out is the internal wiring to the thermistor. It's broken so you don't need to be gentle with it anymore! Pull it out and disconnect the yellow wire from the top of the sender... Remove the nut and pull out the rest of the sender from the thermostat housing. Buy a new temperature sender online or at your local parts store and get it installed. (Save the "hold down" nut just in case the new sender doesn't come with one.) Nissan used the same resistance value for these senders for many years of Z's (and ZX's).
  36. 1 point
    Jhm, thx for the explanation. It had me confused before. The fact that my starter does crank when I apply 12volts directly to the starter where the signal from the ignition switch goes, means that that the ignition solenoid is functioning, right? Tomorrow I gonna get that thing to work, with all this advise. cheers,
  37. 1 point
    Made a call recently about certain parts. Seemed excessively priced, even compared to some higher ebay prices, but the support and conversation was definitely great. If I wasn't so budget minded I definitely wouldn't mind buying there. Think everything was recently moved. There's always an ad on craigslist for the same stuff.
  38. 1 point
    If you use the s12+8 calipers from the later years, they were machined to fit vented roters like the s12w ones but have smaller cylinders making for more of around 57% to 43%. This is what I run and am very happy with the setup.
  39. 1 point
    That "put it back where it was" suggestion is a bad one even for a diff that has a crush sleeve. The R200 has no crush sleeve. The spec is RFT, I want to say it's something like 150 - 200 ft lbs. I always use red loctite on the nut the put my impact on 5 and hit it, empty the compressor until it fills, then hit it again. Never had any issues.
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
    It's pumping gas into the carb though. I'm thinking of just getting a full rebuild kit anyway, of course, you know what they say, 90% of all carb problems are ignition problems! This was true on the '62 Galaxie I've been working on, Rebuilt the carb to end up with a new distributor! Tonight we swapped out cap and rotor. I've read vac, adv. going bad can do weird things. It would barely idle and was rough, it started suddenly, seems like it's missing to me. It was running quite well for weeks then would barely idle and die on touching the gas, limped home and here we are trying to figure it out.
  42. 1 point
    And yet another timing chain mockup series. I'm convinced when they design a motor the first thing they do is the timing chain. Talk about restrictive. SN005 is building a tall deck motor so I needed to work out what we were doing on the timing chain. I was hoping that my normal KA setup would work with a redesigned pivot for the tensioner arm. Actually worked out better than the normal setup. It looks like the extra height on the head will allow the arm to clear the timing cover without modifying the cover. It uses all the stuff from a KA24 timing chain kit except the bottom chain needs to be a 94 link instead of the 92. I was trying to get the arm closer to the tensioner but this is the best I'm going to get. Each full link you add or subtract shortens or lengthens the chain by 5/8” so the adjustment is pretty coarse. The guides are stock out of the box Nissan KA24. The jumper brackets on the tension side are temporary. I’ll design something a little better. I'm happy with the angle on the top tensioner. The upper brackets should start to become a standard item at this point. I changed the way the cam cores are being produced. I'm bringing the cams to length after heat treating and then shipping them to Schnieder for OD turning. This is giving me a lot more control. I know it probably seems like this project has stalled but far from it. I just decided to concentrate on getting my build, V2 and SN005 finished off. I realized after selling 005 that there are still a lot of little details to work out and I don't have enough free time to do my regular work and support any more builds. The next three heads will go a lot smoother now that I have all of this worked out. Derek
  43. 1 point
    A buddy and I are designing a cnc billet triple intake. It’s based off of the harada. It will feature the ability to add a balance tube and come with needle bearings. Stock will be 45mm tubes. It will have a bridge, but it will mainly be for looks, it will attach to the same balance tube holes. Also throttle arms will be long enough to clear the starter circuit. It will use the harada parts that are available, like the connection rods, springs, Shepard’s hook and insulators. It will be customizable for intake runner lengths, bore etc... I’m pretty excited on how it looks. The basic idea is that a high end customize-able intake is missing in the Datsun triple world. I didn’t like the finish/ quality of the harada and some of the mechanics. So building my own. My buddy won’t mass produce them but for a high end build or someone that wants a specific design this will be great. Plus it’s fun to make and design. We should have the throttle shaft all designed and drawn today.
  44. 1 point
    Well, I did want to adjust the fuel and timing maps a bit to get rid of a few drive-ability issues since I'm not running a stock block. Also wanted to pull some timing before turning the boost up again. I also have an 84T ECU I've been scavenging components from it, I'll probably dump the ROM at some point as well.
  45. 1 point
    Finished fabricating the mount for my Woodward steering rack. The new rack is significantly quicker than stock, with a 2.36 ratio, and also simply serves as a replacement as my stock rack was pretty tired and loose. I was unable to find most of the parts to rebuild it, so I figured this was another area where going aftermarket was a good long term strategy. The crossmember is the one from Apex Engineered, and all I did was cut off the stock rack mounts it comes with and make my own for the Woodward rack. The crossmember has some useful features, like multiple control arm pivot point locations and bracing attachments to the rear control arm mounts. It was also much easier to modify for the Woodward rack than the stock crossmember would have been. As shown, the rack is mounted in the stock location relative to the crossmember mounting surface, but it can easily be moved up or down as need be down the road, simply by removing the two bolts and changing the spacers. I am banking a lot that the electric power steering will work as I hope, because with this quicker rack and the 275 tires I plan to use in front....I doubt I would even be able to turn the wheel at parking lot speeds.
  46. 1 point
    Welcome! There is a massive amount of information on this site and really helpful members too. However, I wouldn't expect someone to go source all the info for you. I know it is a bit cliche, but search and read, you will find tons of info. The stickys are a good place to start. You mentioned you want to be competitive. Honestly, an S30 is probably not the most cost effective platform to start with. With that list if desires above, you would probably be money ahead getting a C6 Z06. There have been some amazing S30 track beasts built by members here. Matt Isbell's build with MTI jumps to mind. Good luck, I hope you build a badass S30 and share your process with everyone.
  47. 1 point
    I recommend filler after epoxy. Read the following: http://us.ppgrefinish.com/PPG-Refinish/Training/Training-Guides/Custom-Restoration-Guide Even if you don't use PPG products, it's a good resource on the steps from stripping to painting. Another good resource is: https://www.autobody101.com/forums/
  48. 1 point
    Gorilla lugs are really strong and come in a variety of colors.
  49. 1 point
    I searched this topic myself for a long time and finally bit the bullet and went with 225/50 15 Toyo Proxes R888r. I do not like the thread pattern on the Kuhmo all season tires so this was the only option at a decent price. I don't think I will be taking this car to the track any time soon but I really like the look of this setup and I needed to get new tires when I bought the car. Instead of spending money for tires on the original Mag wheels I just got wheels and tires all at once. I know these tires will not last many miles, but I don't plan on daily driving this car. I don't know why it was difficult to get examples of the fitment on 15x8 Rota RKRs being as it's such a popular setup for 240zs (S30s in general). My car was lowered on Tokico 1050 springs (discontinued) I'm not sure what the drop is as it was done by previous owner. I did have to roll the rear fenders a bit as there is a bit of rub when it goes over bumps. Excuse the dirty car. Ed.
  50. 1 point
    This thread really helped me out; I recently bought a '72 240 off of eBay. It was great but the drivers side door had to be slammed to the point of concern or it would not fully latch. From inside the car it was very difficult. After finding this thread in a bout of restlessness last night; I went to Lowes and bought a 36" piece of 3/8" PEX pipe. PEX is made from polyethylene and is pretty similar to nylon in hardness and low friction. I trimmed a 3/8" piece off and made one cut along the side. After submerging it in boiling water for a few minutes, I formed it around the 1/2" handle of the x-acto I used to cut it with. It snapped right on the contact lobe of the door latch. The door closes almost without effort now. 15 minutes for both doors and $1.60 in materials. No grinding.
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