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  1. 2 points
  2. 2 points
    Semantics is a big deal on this forum. It is one way that separates us from other forums. Making sure an item is called the correct name that people recognize will go a long way. If you want I can edit the title of your post which directly asks for a workaround to the combo switch. Semantically it seems to be called a multi-function relay. The relays themselves seem to last quite a while, I'm still using several stock ones in my 71 that was in use till 2010. I would suspect as miles pointed out it may be the switch contacts on the stalk going out. The hazard lights switch has its own set of wiring so it may be acting as a red herring if you are using that as the reasoning in your train of thought. I suggest taking a breath, people are here to help of their own accord, it may be frustrating to seemingly answer the same question or when someone is caught on a seemingly unrelated point, but realize we need clarity to try and help. It may serve to help their train of thought, and it may seem tedious, but given the free help, maybe try being accommodating? It may serve better to have a post where you clarify exactly what you are looking for that you or others can refer to someone asking a question in the post. I can't answer as I've only looked at the early Z wiring in detail, but it seems odd for the blinker wiring to go through the floor so I can identify with others as to the confusion. I'm finding a note that the part number was used for a fuel pump relay, might be something else to check. I do know the pins are a standard spade connector so you could wire in a modern relay if you can pin out the contacts and make little adapter lengths, I've done that for some older plugs before. Identify power, ground, switch ground, switch power, and output. Then you can use any modern automotive relay.
  3. 2 points
    katman? Where the hell has he been for the last 10+ years? Oh, that's me, back from the dead. That thread may have been on improvedtouring.com. Assuming your friend also has to run the stock drum brakes, here's how we made brakes last in an ITS car, which at the end of its development was probably as fast as any CP vintage car. I don't know what compound Carbotech has today, but back then the HT-9 was the only thing that would hold up to the heat on the front. The HT-10's that replaced them were not as good, but that was about the time that SCCA pissed me off by outlawing remote reservoir shocks so I quit thinking about Z brakes. I ran both the Nismo rear shoe, and the relined Carbotech shoe, I think. We cryo treated rotors and drums. We ran the parking brake so we could adjust the rears during the course of a race. That and having an adjustable prop valve so you can make the rears take their share of the load is critical. If you aren't turning the friction surface of the drums blue, then you ain't there yet. Scour the junk yards and find every Z drum you can find and have them turned and expect to rotate in a new set every weekend. Up front, don't fall into the trap of using a pad that maximizes the pad material, in other words instead of this | | , you want this \ /. The outer radius of the rotor runs hotter because its going faster (linearly) and wears the pad faster. Nothing worse than having to pump the brakes every corner to take up the slop from tapered front pads, maladjusted rear shoes, and expanded rear drums. We drilled holes in the backing plate on the rears for some cooling, but not much else you can do back there. Up front we ran three 3" ducts on each side, one to the hub area of the strut to cool the bearings, one to a custom "can" that blew air on either side of the rotor, and one that blew into the caliper overtop of the pads. That one was tricky to make as there isn't a lot of clearance between the caliper and a 14" wheel that we had to run. I also drilled a series of small holes around the periphery of the pistons just behind where they contact the back of the pads so air could circulate behind the pads from the aforementioned duct over the pads. PM me and I'll send you some pictures.
  4. 1 point
    I dont know if anyone has seen these guys but I just found them and decided to take a gamble on them. The kit looks to be a rocket bunny knock off. Once it comes in I'll get some photos and post them. https://carbonfiberhoods.com/vsaero-frp-tkyo-wide-body-kit-gt-datsun-240z-s30-1970-1973-106078.html
  5. 1 point
    Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
  6. 1 point
    Hey all, Wondering how fast (ET) any of you have gone in the quarter with stock 280 stub axles and flanges? I am not pushing mine very hard with an auto, and a tight converter, and running 12.05 to 12.08. I am putting it up on the converter to stage, so everything is preloaded and there is minimal shock.(235/60 mickey dr's) I would like to upgrade the heads, cam, ect, Should I upgrade the stubs before I go any harder? Thanks.
  7. 1 point
    Well after loosing interest in my previous car (2008 corvette ls3). I wanted to get something pre smog and ended up getting a early 74 260z roller. Was essentially a bare roller but cleaning the floors up was already done so a great starting point. 2 months later had it on the road with a lq4, ls3 heads, boost cam, a sprinkle of nitrous and a t56. My main goal with the car was to just build something that was a blast to drive and it does that well. So far been to a couple 1/2 mile events, been to the 1/4 a handful of times. Still need to do a road course event and maybe try out a drift event with it.
  8. 1 point
    Hello Hybridz Members! Three piece spoiler for Datsun s30 240z 260z 280z Product is made from fiberglass with a flat black primer finish. Hence, spoiler is not a finished product ready for paint. This spoiler has 2 mount holes in center piece and 2 on each individual corner. It also has 2 threaded inserts in center piece and 1 on each individual corner.Quality and fitment are really good, all spoilers are brand new and never installed. some modification might be needed for perfect fitment. Price $280 shipped! - I can provide a discount for a group buy (5 minimum) Item ships from California* Local pick up available Payment: Paypal or cash for local pick up Any questions please feel free to send a PM
  9. 1 point
    Do you access to a good flaring tool? If not consider something like this,https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-pro-brake-tubing-flaring-tool-with-45-and-37-degree-die-set.html It's the best flaring tool I've ever used and if you don't think you'll ever use it again you can sell it on Craigs and get a big chunk of your money back. The one I bought has done complete brake lines on four Z's now and still shows no wear.
  10. 1 point
    So my wife just test fitted the parts as best she could (6 months pregnant with a 2 year old running around) and took the following pictures. Now before saying they arent going to fit, i believe the part of the fender flare that "rolls in" in the back behind the tire is making direct contact with the metal not allowing for it to be fully seated. I believe that once the fender is cut away, the flares will fit properly. she is going to try the rear fender flares on later.
  11. 1 point
  12. 1 point
    thanks D9inger!!! that is one bueatiful engine.
  13. 1 point
    Some after market master cylinders do not have the large reservoir in front. As long as the master cylinder is correct in all other aspects then it doesn't matter. You can always swap the front reservoir from the old master cylinder onto the new one for a "stock" appearance.
  14. 1 point
    Hopefully you don't mind me adding my experience today. Didn't use anything except the saturn vue column and a 77 280z column. I figured a few more pictures of different setups in the thread is always helpful. I cut down the saturn telescoping joint so it would fully collapse and removed the thicker bottom portion of the female portion as well as turning it down about 1mm so it could pass through the datsun bearing at the firewall. Making it collapse fully let me just expand it to whatever length I needed without worrying about measuring the section behind the power steering motor. Then I could weld the original u-joint to the saturn telescoping joint, and pass the whole thing through the original firewall mount after grinding down the welds. Because the power steering motor was free in the rear, it wasn't as solid as I would like. Particularly the steering wheel could have tilted up because it was only held in with the two mounting screws under the dash. So I added an extra brace that seemed to stiffen it up nicely. Washers are a little sloppy I know, but it works and lets me adjust tension. All back together, doesn't stick out too much. I did remove the control box and bolted it to a thick aluminum plate as a heatsink under the dash. Seems to work just fine, haven't had a chance to drive it, I'll update tomorrow.
  15. 1 point
    Hi Guys and Gals, I get emails asking if I still make the ZG light covers and quarter windows and wanted to say that I do at the same price. Please email me at: mclapp5526@gmail.com with any questions and feel free to call anytime at: 816-286-6982 to talk about your car and the plexi pieces. Thanks, Mark Clapp 816-286-6982
  16. 1 point
    Well, after talking with WHP their kit does require shortened axles even though the site doesn't specifically say they are required when using their CV conversion flange. I'm going to try and shorten them myself (cutting in the c clip groove further down the splined portion as outlined on this site) - I'm sick of throwing money at these damn axles. If I can get them at least a 1/2" shorter I can increase the track with the RLCA's and should be fine. I'll report back.
  17. 1 point
    It's been a while since I've anything done to my car due to life getting in the way, however I made an effort to save some money and get some Fab work done. So far thanks to the great guys at Kaizen works here in New Zealand an R33 rear subframe has been mounted into my 280zx with custom mounting points fabbed up but everything else is standard R33 at this point. Now we are waiting for my RB gearbox to be adapted to the L series block so the car can head back for custom engine and trans mounts to be made.
  18. 1 point
    Post a photograph of the engine compartment. From this we can discern whether the original swap was the "JTR method" or the less advantageous non-setback one. If there's rust in the floorboards, almost certainly there is rust elsewhere, in nontrivial amounts. This may or may not require immediate attention, but it does merit jacking up the car (suitably supporting it!) and a thorough examination. Some rust, while annoying, is only cosmetic. This particular car evidently has a 5-lug rear conversion. Does it also have a solid rear-axle conversion? Such a conversion remains controversial even to this day... but properly done, it has its own appeal. What is the rear-axle ratio? If the transmission is a TH350, it won't have an overdrive gear, which is annoying on the highway. Lack of overdrive is, in my opinion, the main reason for why a "race car" is unpalatable on the street.... something to consider. Otherwise the standard routine is to examine and possibly refresh the engine. Do you have specs on the cam? The heads? The compression ratio? Have you done a compression-test? The standard tuning-approach applies, whether it's a Datsun or a Chevelle... lots of literature on that. BTW congratulations on the purchase! Aesthetically it looks aggressive, without being outright garish. Those fender-flairs nicely split the difference between too-much and not-enough. But I do wonder about the rear axle... the rear wheels aren't particularly wide, yet they protrude considerably outboard. Perhaps the axle is too wide? Could it be narrowed? 4-link or ladder-bar or something else?
  19. 1 point
    Ok so I put the old fuse box back in. No issues. Checked voltage on the L & R fuse block with ignition on and power was only coming into the left side like it should. I'll be calling MSA tomorrow. 😕
  20. 1 point
    Well, I started down the path. We'll call it progress. Initial rough up and flame treat. The backing pieces were secured with plastic weld epoxy initially and then gone over with alternating layers of the g/flex 655 and West 105/207 and glass with sanding in between. If I had to do it over I would have just made some 90 degree brackets with thin metal and epoxied those on added rigidity. And what it looked like before the finish cuts for the gauges. Between all the layers, the back plates are probably between 1/8" -1/4" thick. Plenty sturdy enough for the gauges. Now I'm at kind of an impasse about how to secure it to the frame. Originally I had planned on using the factory mounting holes and putting tapped spacers in between the cap and the dash and then securing with a bolt. But, between the cover not fitting perfectly to begin with, and then slightly warping with the flame treat it's off enough that the glove box won't line up. I'm not concerned about the center panel since I was just going to make a flat plate there either way but the whole thing is pretty flimsy. I can heat again and probably get it close but it will involve adding a lot of support to get rid of the flex if I don't address the void. So, now I'm toying with filling the void between the cap and frame with expanding foam to help with the rigidity. But with that comes issues about making sure the alignment is dead nuts before the pour, making sure the materials are compatible and will bond, etc etc. Pain in the ass is what this is...
  21. 1 point
    Hey sorry for the slow reply. Didn't get notified that anyone replied. Since I have Koni struts, I went with Koni's own bump stop. Part number 70.34.95.000.0 I agree with you. Some of those poly bump stops aren't any different than not having bump stops at all.
  22. 1 point
    @calZ I just saw that thread on the body kit forum ha! I searched on google but it didn't pull that up, thanks for sharing that! @Bartman that looks pretty slick! post up pics when you're done!
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    At $800 +shipping across the country, that's still a little rich for my blood. I'm still going to try and doctor the current Accu Form skin, it's just going to take a little more work than I'd thought. I did discover there is a local West Marine so I was able to pick up some g/flex and some 105/207 resin/ hardener for the skin. I went over everything with 80 grit and flame treated before applying the g/flex. Side note: I went with the 655 vs the 650 because it specifically mentioned hard to bond plastics. It is definitely more of a gel than most of the epoxies I've used. It says it can be used to fill voids I think up to .5" without needing to be reinforced. I tried laying in some glass strand just for more grip for the upper layers and it really doesn't wet out very well. BUT (!) when it dries - this stuff isn't going anywhere. That's as far as I got yesterday. I've still got to re-sand it and lay some more glass on the back side to reinforced around the gauges, then I can move on to the top and figure out the mounting. I'll get some pictures up of the process.
  25. 1 point
    Hi again! The car runs and drives very good…but I’m moving it to another shop for the past details. The tunings will not be deep, but will consist in verifying the electrical system with the addition of new connectors, recovering a corner on the dash, applying the centre console, tuning the front bumpers and correcting the leather parts on the back! The wheels will be recovered into the original charcoal colour! These works will make the car looks better and will make me rest fine…I’m tired of waiting… Let’s go to the works: Interior glass trim. Hood latch Almos tone hour to aplly the mirror… Gearbox insulator applied… New interiors…worked very good!!! Some details… The plate gate arrived and was apllied. I state the fuel rail wasn’t the correct for the 71 generation…so, I applied a correct one! Some more details… Here is the result befere went home! Filling up the tank…so great… At home…near the 510 SSS Hope you liked it…let’s wait 15 days to get it completely done!!! Regards Mário
  26. 1 point
    So I checked over the suspension and yes, there are definitely needle bearings in the top hats below the camber plates. I have bearings for the springs on order so I'll see if they help. Yes sir, I was talking about those. I realize now those bearings aren't actually dealing with rotation of the shock body directly. I'm going to be heading to the alignment shop again soon, as I have installed some adjustment in the rear I would like to dial in. I'll ask them to take a look at the fronts again once I install the bearings and new bump stops.
  27. 1 point
    Thanks for the replies. This just happens on the left side. The right side seems to have no wear whatsoever, and the spring and strut tube turn together smoothly. I'll double check if they came with bearings in the hats. I know that the gold blocks in the T3 camber plates have bearings built in. So in short, I need those bearing top hats in addition to the bearings already in the camber tops? The coilovers came pre-assembled from T3 before the install. I'll have to check if they had the hats with bearings, if not I'll definitely be getting a set. Funny that it would happen only on one side...
  28. 1 point
    It helps if you have it the right way up.... It's the combination Nissan/Prince emblem, introduced after the 1966 merger. It's a monogram with stylised letter 'N' and letter 'P' combined to form a cypher. It was derived from the old single letter 'P' Prince logo, and intended to pay respect to the history of the Prince marque when it came under the wing of the Nissan group. Here it is on the front of the Nissan R382 sports racer. This is the correct orientation:
  29. 1 point
    Sometimes people discover that the rear caliper bleed screw hole is not actually the highest point when installed after these conversions, because they're not designed for Z cars. It's close but still has a spot for an air bubble. They have to unbolt the caliper and rotate it so that the channel to the bleed port really is the highest point. They bleed the brakes with the caliper loose, then rotate it back and bolt it down when they're done. Be the bubble.
  30. 1 point
    Sounds more like they were just bad shocks/inserts from the beginning, or they were actually the wrong ones for the car. The oil in the strut tube would have had no effect. It's on the outside of the shock body. It doesn't move at all as the suspension moves. Just a pool of oil, sitting there, doing nothing. KYB makes a good product. Good luck.
  31. 1 point
    I don't know a ton. Previous owner had it for 10 years. Didn't drive it much. Kept it fairly clean. Owner before that was in TX. Very little scale rust. Clean car. It's been swapped to an L28. Has round top SUs. 5 speed trans. Definitely some work on it here and there, but fairly stock, original. I've changed the oil and plugs. I'm going to do trans and rear end fluids asap as well. I drove it home from the seller, 90 miles. Mostly back country roads and some highway. It'll do 70+ no problem. But it doesn't FEEL great. For a beautifully running 73, I'm happy to far. I got a crazy deal on it, $4500. Been a dream car since I was a kid. So I couldn't be happier.
  32. 1 point
    Thanks for taking things in stride. The title change I'm sure helps. The point on semantics is pretty clear, if you search combo switch as per the previous title, it brings up hundreds of links to the headlight combo switch, and a few on the blinker/high beam combo switch which are a very common problem. Switching relay module or mult-function relay per the part number brings up much fewer, but more specified posts, using the part number you get very very specific, but few posts. If someone else in the future is looking for the same CA specific relay switching module for the blinkers or turn signals it should now pop up and you will potentially be their savior pending the solution. Don't worry you aren't alone, when I announced I had ordered pipe for my tubular control arms, people were quick to correct me or to make sure I was using the right material. In my mind I know I meant tube, DOM A513 to be specific, but coming from fluids and flow I was thinking pipe, slip of the fingers and now I had to sit and try to convince people I wasn't trying to build structural components from used rusty drainage pipe. I think it is clear now that you are looking for the CA specific switching relay module/multi function relay, or a work around for that. In the early cars the lack of relays did send a lot of amperage through not so great connections, so I would suggest maintaining a relay point rather than a direct wire unless you are using low amperage items like LED turn signals. Pin it out and swap to a modern relay using male spade connectors to a 4 or 5 post 12v automotive relay. I have to say this forum was such a place, at least 9 years ago when I joined. My first posts I was dinged for grammar/capitalization. However, that is part of the character of this forum. You get a specified knowledge base that is immense, in return you may have to do a once over on your post and try and use the common term. So I will say don't throw the whole forum or forums in general under the bus. Keep in mind we could not be here if it wasn't for the generosity of donations and the hard work of those on the network end. We almost saw closure a couple years ago and then you would be relegated to searching through facebook posts. We are more oriented around engine swaps, suspension tech, and such. Looking for stock replacement parts, you may have an easier time on classiczcar as they are excellent at finding and maintaining the stock Z platform and will most likely have found a more bolt in/plug in solution if you are not familiar with pinning out relay wiring. You might try datsun parts and needs as there are a lot of Californian members, ratsun as well who may be able to find you a used replacement part.
  33. 1 point
    Welcome to the forums, I will say this is dangerously close to skirting the rules there. If you would like to sell your product please feel free to make a thread in the vendor forum. I do wonder if it is some exotic material that justifies the price. That may be information you wish to include in your own thread. If you would like there is even a wind tunnel section that I'm sure would benefit from the data backing up the performance.
  34. 1 point
    Goodness I love this forum, you really can find everything. Quote from this thread: Pretty sure that is what happened. I measured what I did and found that I was sticking 13mm past the flange of the aluminum spacer at first, that caused the pre-load on the master and the exact symptom of the brakes coming on and staying on. Then on the side of the freeway I moved it down to 6mm past the flange and the car drove back with no problems. I have it currently set to 9mm which is in spec, but I will be checking for preload and complete release to make sure I don't run into problems again.
  35. 1 point
    Will be interesting to see how this changes things
  36. 1 point
    Not a problem. I can make as many as there is demand for. And who ever is on the fence can always just wait for results from either my car or another customer before contacting me for anything.
  37. 1 point
    Maybe try old school bleeding methods before the pressure bleeder. As Miles suggests there might be air in the MC. An air bubble might not get pushed out of the MC by a pressure bleeder if the MC is "nose up". Be the air bubble...where would you hide?
  38. 1 point
    If the rear cylinders were leaking there would be fluid. Did you see any? Sounds more like a bad MC. The front and rear systems are stacked, in series. If one seal fails the pedal will drop that distance until the second one catches. Your new MC might fix it. Here's a drawing, they're all the same. The right seal contains the fluid, the other two create pressure. You can see how you can lose one but keep pressure on the other end.
  39. 1 point
    Thanks! A 240 tank would work fine too because I'm 85% sure I'm going to put a surge tank in anyway so having the baffles or larger flow may not be as necessary. It has been a challenge but we must soldier on. I'm open to options so I'll check them out. I did not. I think people with carbed cars like them because they come baffled from the factory so it's easier to convert to EFI.
  40. 1 point
    The links jhm & calZ are great. For a street car what I have found is that if you strengthen the frame rails then do some basic strut bars the car is plenty stiff for your needs and if you want to a bit more then do some further bars just for the towers; this will avoid needing cage. If you do want to race you would just need a hoop but for street there is no need. I added some pics of my rails and others have done similar versions. I did another 240Z where we found great boxed rails that were thinner and fully boxed so we just welded that on the bottom and eliminated welding inside the car; easier and similar result. This way your car is more street and others driving with you will appreciate not being in a cage. I own a more caged Z as well but when you get older you will find women often do not want to be in a caged car, maybe just a hoop but nothing more...
  41. 1 point
    Not a JCR whale tale, but it’s still pretty cool. GLWS
  42. 1 point
    It's 36.3. You should check between filter and rail. If you're getting 60-70 before the filter you might have a clogged filter. But, in short, no offense...you're doing things wrong. Stop the random stuff and get in to the FSM or the EFI Book and do things the recommended way. You'll save time in the long run.
  43. 1 point
    Good catch. Thank you for pointing that out.
  44. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  45. 1 point
    All my suspension clunking is gone. The car is extremely solid now. The steering is a lot more reactive also. Overall I can't wait to try it out on the 21st at Buttonwillow. Also started the process of rebuilding an SR trans and and just waiting on a machined L series bellhousing right now from Godzilla Raceworks
  46. 1 point
    Poly bushings on the compression rod? You'll need to replace the poly bushing on the back side with a rubber bushing - otherwise you'll probably break the compression rod. Ask me how I know... There are a fair number of thread posts regarding the issue.
  47. 1 point
    It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
  48. 1 point
    Hello HybridZ, just joined and wanted to say hi as i have some big plans for my 280z. Long story short, i currently own a fully build evo8, LS swapped FD RX7, and recently got into the S30 life. i had a 260z that i was going to fully restore, then found a 280z that fit my needs perfectly. Anyways, i just wanted to say hello and i am looking forward to all your support as im certainly new in the classic car world VIdeos Buying my 260z Buying my 280z 280z overview I put my 280z on a dyno
  49. 1 point
    I know i'm bumping an old thread, but I just purchased the Tanks Inc. setup to copy what you did. Thanks for the pics and info about the setup!
  50. 1 point
    This thread really helped me out; I recently bought a '72 240 off of eBay. It was great but the drivers side door had to be slammed to the point of concern or it would not fully latch. From inside the car it was very difficult. After finding this thread in a bout of restlessness last night; I went to Lowes and bought a 36" piece of 3/8" PEX pipe. PEX is made from polyethylene and is pretty similar to nylon in hardness and low friction. I trimmed a 3/8" piece off and made one cut along the side. After submerging it in boiling water for a few minutes, I formed it around the 1/2" handle of the x-acto I used to cut it with. It snapped right on the contact lobe of the door latch. The door closes almost without effort now. 15 minutes for both doors and $1.60 in materials. No grinding.
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