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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/18/21 in all areas

  1. I want to thank all of you here for giving me inspiration for my build. I have adopted the Hybrid Z name for my build years ago since this site provided a lot of information that I consider priceless. I was able to meet some great people at ZCON, some that know my build and others that just wanted to say hello and compliment me on my build. When I built this car I built it as my version of what a Z should be therefore I know a lot of people were not going to like it since it was my vision and nothing else. Taking my car to ZCON for the 1st time and walking out of there with these awards it’s just incredible, especially with all the awesome cars I was competing against. It’s great to see the judges appreciate all the hard work and effort that has gone into it. These are the awards I received. 1st Place in Ultra Modified Best Engine Gold Cup- This was totally unexpected and shocking it was given to a Z with and LS3 since most of these guys are Nissan purists. Again, thank you all for your support and keeping this site alive.
    3 points
  2. There was some conversation in other topic about blade type rollbar. So, i have one like this. 32x3mm cro-mo tube and 260mm blades. Blades are 35 to 25mm wide and 6mm thick, steel of course. Bar itself is more just a link between blades. This type rollbar works mainly with blades, i.e tube is stiff and blades are flexing (if they do) It depends how they are adjusted. If blade is vertical, it´s very stiff, horizontally they are pretty flexible. Any position between those, are something between, ofc. To adjust, just loose bolt (most left head of blade) and tur to desired position. Or attach cable and make remote control.
    2 points
  3. Hi All It has been a while and I have been racing e36's, TA2's V8's hard. But that Datsun bug bit me again, (It helps to have one sitting in your barn the last 11 years!!!!) Over that time there have been periods I have done several things to it, but campaigning the other cars always meant to revivals short lived. However selling after selling the Sprint race car and just having an endurance car it started to itch. And to be fair I first went on racecarsdirect before I figured that was a stupid waste of money and knowledge. So without too much fuzz... She is back. Here is a link to the original thread: I think it is a blessing in disguise that I haven’t finished it sooner, racing from 10 years means you learn allot on what is smart and what is not. And over the years allot of 'spares' have found their way to the chassis, like a Tilton pedal box, fuel cell etc etc And times change so supplies do to, there a solution for the rear control arms by these guys https://www.apexengineered.com/ So ill put in my order for a front and rear subframe for the car. Here are some pictures of the body as it sits now: First it has been blasted Then powder coated Saturday ill start with mounting some small stuff like the pedal box. For an engine it will run an L28 with forged internals, kameari chain drive, isky cam, worked head, race oil pan and probably ITBS over the set of Dellortos i still have. I might go dry sump but that has pros and cons, the con is it ads weight.
    2 points
  4. Car is still around. Still drysumped LS2, jenvey throttles with quaife 6 speed sequential and independent 9 inch. 18 x 11 wheels and 300 mm slicks all round, big AP brakes. Cool car, but the process over 9 years has been expensive. 3 x R200s, 3 t56 gearbox’s, 3 sets of coil overs, 2 sets of brakes (plus numerous rotors and pads -last set of maintenance rotors and pads was $3400. I motor blown due to oil pressure, one due to a lifter, one cooked, but still ran. Driveline is not bullet proof, but works hard so requires a little maintenance. Video is what I class as a diagnostic video. It also happens to show a Z doing a 2.18 lap around Bathurst. My quaife had dropped one tooth on 3rd gear.
    2 points
  5. I would say a week + 10 posts, and see how that works. I think banning new members from posting links could also help.
    1 point
  6. I bent the 240 pedal a bit so my throttle cable went through the firewall opening correctly. Your's looks like a 280 pedal, much thicker metal. I wouldn't be afraid to bend it. If the stop and cable are adjusted, it should only ever be fighting the spring tension on the throttle body.
    1 point
  7. To add to this a bit, even though they aren't for the front, I just received some adapters I designed to put modern BMW speed sensors into a short nose R200.
    1 point
  8. This is my first Datsun. I traded a 1979 Triumph Spitfire with a Ford 2.6 Cologne motor for it. It’s originally a Nevada car but now it resides here in Utah. When I got the car, the original engine was completely seized and wouldn’t turn over with a 6 foot breaker bar. After spending tons of hours lurking on this forum and reading the Jags That Run book, I finally was able to stuff a Chevy 350 and a TH350 transmission into the car. It has gotten a lot more fun after that. Here are a couple of pictures of the journey.
    1 point
  9. First time spraying base-clear urethane. Made lots of mistakes and have a lot of runs, but live and learn! To be fair, painting an engine bay with added stiffeners and sharp angles is tough, even for the experienced. Sprayed epoxy. Sprayed silver urethane base coat 8 hours later, followed by clear. Masked off the urethane and scuffed the overlap yo give it some “tooth” for the asphalt (3M) undercoating. All still within the epoxy cute window so it should harden rock solid. Working on prep work in the interior but it’s hot as heck out here! Stay cool my friends. IMG_8831.MOV
    1 point
  10. After 4,500 miles in two weeks, and a dozen low 10 and high 9 second passes, Jason is back home from Rocky Mountain race week, having driven the ENTIRE way and placing 3rd place in the 10.00 true street class.
    1 point
  11. With those giant rotors, you will not generate very much heat into the pad (relative of course). The Wilwood pads are surprisingly excellent for that application in street or track duty.
    1 point
  12. I try to keep up with damper technology as it has been developing rapidly over the last 10 years or so. Basically what was F1 technology 10 years ago is now available to the public. Most high end dampers still rely on some way of controlling a fluid with valves, orifices, tubes or sleeves with special features to control extreme forces. The highest end are infinitely adjustable, consistent, and repeatable over long distances. Active and semi-active systems are often banned in motorsports and are just now becoming more popular. Most modern sports cars have semi-active dampers that can be programmed for various effects and conditions. Corvettes have a very highly developed version of this. A suspension "master" spends countless hours developing the few programs that end up in the production version, up to and including sending test teams with 100's of tires to the Nuremberg Ring each year. Now that technology is available to the aftermarket. There are a few providers out there but I was really intrigued with these guys in Netherlands. https://tractivesuspension.com/ They sell a fully programmable stand alone strut with g force sensors that can be adapted to many platforms. What really shocked me was the price. $6-7000 for a full package. I know that seems expensive, but compared to high end struts (check out Motion Control strut prices) this is a total bargain. They can be programmed to fully control stiffness, roll, dive, and squat so no roll bars needed. Imagine 30+ year old car that is fully comfortable on the street, yet capable of setting lap records with a program change. Pretty much like a new Porsche or Corvette.
    1 point
  13. Since I made this thread things have changed, I changed the order to Gold mesh 15X8's and 15X9's at 0 offset. I will be using 225/45ZR15 and 245/40ZR15 tires from Hankook. Spacers are going to give me the offset I want and the poke out I desire. Thanks for the replies.
    1 point
  14. hatepotholez, I had a similar problem with new Precision Door Weatherstripping as you. I fixed it in one day and did not spent any money on the repair. I will post how I did it in my next post -V8 Z forum Gen III & IV Chev V8Z coming soon. Check it out! Toolman
    1 point
  15. More eye candy tonight. I am so glad I assembled the pedals before putting the floor in. It took me 4 hours to get the MCs correct, set the throttle linkage, and get everything tight. I left access to do this stuff from the topside, but I am sure it would have taken twice as long. Only thing left before I take it off rotisserie is assembling front struts and taking measurements to put into the suspension software.
    1 point
  16. Just a very small update. While preparing the passenger side fender for the bodyshop, i realized i dont have any nice fender emblems anymore, so i immediately ordered a set, since i saw they were still available new from Nissan: Nothing crazy, but another little piece of the Puzzle is ready to be installed, once the shell and body panels are painted...
    1 point
  17. This community is not what it used to be, but the flame keeps burning. Maybe not as many replies as you might have gotten in the past, but also not as many assholes. Again, all of is that follow you recognize this is a project you are taking the time to make it right and it's not going to disappear unfinished. And keep in mind you could probably message most any other member for advice if you needed.
    1 point
  18. @jhm thanks John!! I found a pair for a reasonable price on the eBay site you shared and got them on order. Many thanks!! Now to noodle a flare option and get it all mounted before I finish bodywork dunno what I’d do without this community. Thanks all
    1 point
  19. Just to follow up on this, I purchased the vents and they are nicely built and look sweet but they do NOT fit without modifying. I had to remove at least 1/4" of material from the edges to get them to fit in the hood recesses.
    1 point
  20. A little update on my ITB build. In the middle of this build I decided to buy a historic building and renovate it, then have my first child, so everything got pushed to the back. I am finally finding time to work on it all again. I think one of my biggest issues was voltage from my old alternator, upgrading that has made everything more happy. Well finally got my osgiken clutch out and went with a stage 1 from exedy with a lightened steel flywheel. The osgiken was way too hard for me to street drive and my wife hated it. It was poorly installed by me and it's a pretty racey clutch. I sent to Z car off to a guru. Andrew Kazanis, he swapped the clutch, found my clunk (exhaust hitting during load) and change my rear main seal. Then his buddy Matt finally fixed my passenger regulator. Which hasn't worked in years. I went with a repopped one. Matt thinks my rear end is a little noisy, but Andrew can't hear it. I cannot thank Andrew enough for all his help. He is a friend and just an all around great guy. If I was to start this over, I would pick an ECU that someone in the area knows. I think ITB is something I jumped into, without enough knowledge or money. So many small issues popped up, and all stopped or slowed me down massively. You really end up chasing your own tail a lot, trying to do all of this. A few on here and on facebook have helped a ton. Tioga, Richard Boyk, Rodney have helped so much. I can't thank them all enough. Maps, settings etc... Somehow they have completely different views on pretty much all of the maps, but all are very knowledgeable and all know a ton more then me. It will be interesting as I road tune which maps/ settings I like more. Haltech is nicely made stuff, but I found their original software extremely hard to figure out. They have since done a massive massive upgrade (NSP) and it's much easier to use now and much more intuitive. Also tells you when settings and maps are in conflict. Which is huge! I am getting pretty confidante and I think I have all the small ECU settings correct. The ECU should start self tuning. So time to drive her and get it running right. I literally got stuck for months from one stupid box being checked, I couldn't get the idle right during cold starts! IAC or not. I will most likely attempt to use IAC again. I have it fully plumbed and wired, it's also a learning feature of the ecu, so it should be the best route for cold starts. I will turn it off after say 100 degrees, which the motor idles fine after that. My hand throttle works, also using timing to help cold starts also helps a ton. Also don't rip out perfectly good jenvy throttles, for vintage SK throttles unless you are dumb:)
    1 point
  21. I've been out of the scene since 2004, but purchased a 1971 240Z about 5 years ago and it's been sitting ever since. I finally got to the point that I wanted to start the restoration, which initiated last week. My 18yo son is helping me so it has been all good thus far. The plan is to do all the patch panel work myself along with the rust treatment and then have a body shop do the body work. I just want to make sure all of the rust is neutralized or removed and because I have all the necessary equipment to do this at my house, what the heck. Starting with the back of the car we removed the entire rear panel due to excessive rust. At this point I have 99% of the rust removed, but perhaps need to fabricate a few patch panels and decide on why type of rust neutralizer I should use along with the primer before welding the panel back to the car. I don't know how quickly all of this will get done, but it is my intent to steadily get the patch panel work finished.
    1 point
  22. Couple pics from a recent install I did a couple weeks ago in a customers car.
    1 point
  23. "71c" transmission. Technically this one was out of a Silvia, but it's the same as the late s14 ones.
    1 point
  24. She's in! Need to bleed the clutch to check everything but it's all bolted up to the engine side and alternator is back on. Waiting on a new speedo cable, reverse switch, and shifter gasket before I fill it up. Afterward I'll get the new driveshaft in and double check everything Spent a decent chunk of time before it was rebuilt cleaning the bellhousing and tailhousing so they were painted and cleaned up a bit. It's looking nice with that new T3 crossmember even though it's not perfect. Currently on the way are a new intercooler and piping among a few other things. Edit - Also removed the clutch weights from the Centerforce clutch per a L series builder's recommendation. Supposedly makes it difficult to shift once you start getting up to about 6k rpm. I don't expect to get there often, but with my modest goals and the added rotational weight, it feels like the added clamping force isn't worth the tradeoff of some questionable shifting at high rpm
    1 point
  25. Another cool product I have found is the "Steel it" stainless steel spray paint. I think i will use it on some suspension parts. Kind of a dull silver finish, but durable as hell. A can is Expensive and does not last long but it is a great coating. I bought mine from McMaster Carr.
    1 point
  26. I built something similar for my race Z. I used .050” aluminum on the sides, and for the top and bottom the material is about the thickness of a beer can, about .010”. I used the lower right and left areas to funnel air for a second brake cooling duct on each side. Originally I had a sheet of lexan across the upper half, to block off the right and left upper half, and perforated the center for the radiator duct. After a bit of vigorous bump drafting the front got messed up a bit so the lexan went away. I really should replace it, the appearance was much better.
    1 point
  27. Ok… never done this before. Bought a devilbiss gun for $40 on eBay last year and finally got the chance to take it for a spin. I’m using Speedokote 2K DTM primer in the gallon size. Threw my rear wheels on and carted the sucker out to my driveway. 3 hours of spraying, and she is coated! Everything from the door/fender jam forward is complete. Really excited, because now I can actually see an end in sight! Glad I didn’t try to do it all at once, as the primer does not flow as well as I’d hoped (Need to buy a reducer for it). Now I need to fabricate an AL gauge/switch cluster (so I can weld the roll-bar mounts) clean/scrub the interior and I can primer through to the rear door-jam. OH! ARC switch cluster came in. This sucker in neat! Fuses and relays all-in-one, with a ribbon cable to the switches themselves. IMG_7892.MOV
    1 point
  28. Thanks for your interest. I have spent the past several years trying to convince myself that I am not insane (though the project may be), and my move to the AME chassis was a big decision. It was a trade-off in spending money up front to save me time and ultimately get a car capable of handling the way I would expect after dumping tons of money into it regardless of which direction I choose. I have followed some of the other members' projects, and I see tons of work going into reinforcing the unibody which ultimately adds a lot of weight anyway. My goal with the AME chassis is that it, together with a minimally designed roll cage to meet NHRA / SCCA requirements, will provide all of the primary rigidity for the car, and the small remaining shell of the body I will use will just go along for the ride pretty much. I have struggled with coming to terms on a few aspects of the project. I don't like super wide wheels that protrude far outside the original body lines of the car. I wanted to keep that minimal, while recognizing that I would definitely need fender flares for what I have planned. Initially I wanted 17" wheels because I though 18" wheels looked strange on the Z car and was afraid they would just transmit too much road vibration to make it enjoyable to drive on the street. Plus, 17" tires now are relatively cheap. However, I also wanted to stick with a max tire diameter of about 25", so I came up with limitations on the 17" wheels and tire sizes. I finally decided on 18", and both front and back will be 25" diameter. OE Datsun tires were 24.6 I believe, and I felt it important to stay as close as possible to that. The narrowest track width (hub to hub mounting) that AME offers is 55.5 (OE Z car is 54.5), so I went with that on the front and rear, and am using 5.5" backspacing on the front wheels (18 x 9) and 6.5 backspacing on the rear (18 x 10.5) to keep the wheels tucked in as much as possible. I'll be picking up my wheels within the next 60-90 days and will post pics when I have them.
    1 point
  29. Price lowered to $50 for both, plus shipping to your location from zip 29303
    1 point
  30. Personally I think ARBs are just as useful to road racing as they are to autox. I know a lot of people like to argue that point but they are a tool help with setup. I can tell from my hillclimbing days that my car was easier/nicer to drive when using ARBs to balance the fast corners. You can spring the car stiff enough to not need them but if you don't have a really smooth course it will not put power down as well and the car will have a lot more of a snappy feel when loaded up and ride over bumps. In the end it's all down to how you like the car to feel and what makes you confident in how the car behaves. If you have no confidence and feel is crap it doesn't matter how fast XYZ driver is with a similar setup. What I learned about the splined bars is that you need to rate test them about 3 times before they will read the same. If a bar is used then it will probably do this. I bought some from Roush years ago that were supposed to be used and came in new packaging. You can rate test them on the car locking the other opposite side at level ride height and then handing weights from the spindle or weld a hook to an old steel wheel and bolt that on to simulate the best experience and then hang weights from a chain and use a laser level on the wall or piece of plywood or similar. Your just looking for what happens hole to hole. And you can run both sides in different holes to split the rate (most people forget this). The advantage to this method is you will know what the installed rate at the wheel is. That's what you need for all the spreadsheets that calculate wheel loads. You might as well make some droop limiters too while you are there. If you add a forward facing arm you can build a stop using a pivoting foot bolt (https://www.mcmaster.com/leveling-pads/). Or use the arm side and capture how far it can extend. Just make sure there's enough clearance for the wheel/tire combo. Hope that helps, Cary
    1 point
  31. Today i got an odd little NOS piece set in my mailbox. I found these turn signals a while ago in Germany. When i checked the part numbers, i realized the European Microfiches say it's a "West germany" Spec part. 1x Left side 26165-N3600 and 1x right side 26160-N3600. This made me even more curious, so i got them. I'm not sure why they're different. Must probably have been some local law or regulation (Similar to the french taillights), which required different blinkers. Here is a comparison of three different types. Left: West germany". It has a tilted rubber piece, for a more angled turn signal, and a long tail connecting cable. Center: Original ones that came on my 1972 swiss (european spec) cars, with straight rubber. Unfortunately the cable was cut, so i have no reference here. Right: Some asian Turn signal reproductions with a short tail cable and different connector and "straight" rubber. I wish i could find out the reason behind this. An odd and probably rare piece. Nice to have in my collection.
    1 point
  32. Couple pics of various cars that got back to me with progress of their builds.
    1 point
  33. https://kfvintagejdm.com/product-category/datsun/?fbclid=IwAR2T8lFNnlM0_l6ywNaPiWWpnX3fLlONFA_vq1zqM3Z1f21CSq6Z0vUeZxk Here's a link to their datsun parts
    1 point
  34. I wouldn't assume that the housing type guarantees the internals are the same. I like to browse Rockauto or Nissan sites and look at part compatibility. Click the part number in Rockauto and compatibility will show up. The Nissan site is a little more tedious. I chose 2008 for an example, a couple of parts. https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/nissan,2008,armada,5.6l+v8,1438226,drivetrain https://parts.nissanusa.com/p/Nissan_2008_Armada-SE-56L-V8-AT-4WD/Differential-Pinion-Bearing-Rear/89867147/38120-7S000.html
    1 point
  35. Hello Newbie, Looks like you have found a decent looking car. Should you need help with most anything related to your new z, there is tons of good information here at HybZ and over on ClassicZcar. Searching past post will reveal discussions on most topics and well thought out questions usually are answered by those who have traveled the road before. Welcome.
    1 point
  36. @jhm @clarkspeed thank you both, sincerely. I may be a smidge perfectionist, and I say that equally as a criticism and an asset. I think I have frustrated the heck out of Greg by now LOL. “Dude get that tub on the track” haha I have some serious EP GCR challenges with the tube steel, but if I suck as a driver I doubt the judges/competitors will press the point. I suppose it would be a welcome problem to have. Most of this will be hidden under aluminum cladding. No better feeling than when you take the hood back off, place it back in the car, and hear that sweet “click” noise without the car putting up a fight. you can see what I did with one of pics. Welded the tube into the general “location”, then welded the pin mounting plate directly to the tube with the hood on, all from underneath. That’s how I ensured there was no lateral load on the pin. The hood flexes quite a bit, so I could not rely on dimensions off-car. i plan to put in two rubber bump-stops mid-way back under the hood, as the hood “sits” flatter than the fenders. Need a little encouragement to sit-up.
    1 point
  37. The momo 3503 is 80mm tall. I measured the stock wheel to be about 375mm in diameter, the thickness is about 25-30mm, and overall height is about 110mm. Meaning, a 30mm dish steering wheel on the momo hub would be very similar to the stock setup.
    1 point
  38. Thanks for the comments. I am in the process of building it now. The drivetrain is done along with most of the body work. I got the car as a rolling shell and have never driven it. I just don't have the experience to know what stock parts can really benefit from upgrading. For example, I don't know if the stock moustache bar or stock front control arms are worth upgrading. Points taken on the front brakes. I'll definitely look to get something better. I am running 15" wheels so that is a consideration. I don't have a master cylinder picked out yet. I was looking at the Toyota Tacoma upgrade that some others have done. I already need to buy a new rear sway bar since my stock one that goes in front of the diff won't fit with the super 8.8. I'll probably get the ST rear kit. As far as seats, I will be running 2000 Viper seats. They fit and look great after some minor floor pan surgery. I will definitely be doing all the chassis and engine tuning once I get the car up and running. Thanks
    1 point
  39. I agree with @rturbo 930.....if you plan to upgrade the front brakes, I'd go with something other than the Toyota calipers. Those things weigh a ton and it's all unsprung weight. There are numerous options/kits out there that incorporate aluminum calipers and vented rotors. Also, if you ARE upgrading the front brakes, why would you want to keep solid front rotors? Those are actually the biggest achilles heel of the OEM system, as they are prone to overheating when subjected to sustained, intensive use. Since you've already swapped the rears for discs, I'm assuming that you've also gone with a bigger MC? If not, that should be on your near-term list. I know your question is focused on brakes and suspension, but have you upgraded your seats? That alone can make a huge difference in driving pleasure and comfort. Lots of good choices from Recaro, Sparco, etc....and there's a couple good threads here on seat swaps. Your combo sounds super nice -- I hope you're enjoying it!!
    1 point
  40. So I found the problem while going over the vacuumal lines again. It was a bad connection to the temperature sensor causing the motor to run very rich. Cleaned and tightened up the connection and all is well again. @NewZed Thank you once again. It was just luck i found this bad connection when i bumped the harness in the area.
    1 point
  41. Fwiw, I lowered my engine 20mm and had to grind a little off the oil pan edge and rack mount. so 2" lowering would need some work.
    1 point
  42. WOW, I can't believe it! Where can I sign up for this amazing offer?
    1 point
  43. FWIW, the 6L80 is also based on the ZF 6HP design as well though with a few additional changes to put the TCM on the Valve body and using a different style of Pump (Vane vs. Gear). They do make controllers now that allow a 6L80/6L90 to talk to the aftermarket ECM's as well http://www.zerogravityperformance.com/product/tcm-2650-mechatronic-transmission-controller-6l80e-6l90e-6l50e/
    1 point
  44. Update again. Even with Rubber mount, still could hear the shifter rattle at 2000 RPM of engine speed about 1100 drive shaft speed. We had the drive shaft re tubed by the group that did the shaft originally. Better but not right, blurred rear view mirror at 65 mph. Took CVs off so all we had was shaft trans and differential. Still vibrated, this is when we did the rubber mount above. Took shaft out again and had it balanced, better but still not good. Took trans out and had the rear housing replaced (stripped drain plug) and some other stuff done. Mainly had the main shaft triple checked. Back together and still a small but annoying shifter rattle. In a last ditch effort before ordering a CV drive shaft we had the shaft remade by another vendor. Voila, finally can drive the car at any speed with only a minuscule vibration and they just be the LS as I can hear the same harmonic in a lot of You tube videos. Took multiple attempts but putting the miles on now is much more pleasant. Sad this forum isn't busier. Richard.
    1 point
  45. I have been driving this thing longer and longer distances, trying to correct all the bugs and other things that I didn't like. Some of the issues: After 50 or 60 miles, it would shred the serpentine belt. I found that the tensioner was approximately .12" out of alignment with the other pulleys. This was strange since the tensioner is a GM LS3 part, but I shimmed it a bit and solved the shredding problem. Then it started throwing the belt. I switched to a belt a couple of sizes smaller (shorter) and that problem seems solved. I had minor leakage around the passenger side door when washing the car. Fixing this was just a matter of loosening the window frame screws, moving the frame inward so it made more solid contact with the seal, and retightening the screws. All good now (I think). The hatch gets water inside it when washing the car. I am 99% sure the entry is via the spoiler hardware, and can be fixed with rubber gaskets and thread sealant, just haven't dealt with it yet. Assorted clunking noises from the rear end when going over bumps. This was partly due to having too long adjusting screws for the rear upper strut adjustment plates. When the suspension bumped, the upper spring perch was hitting the screws. Shorter screws fixed that. It still clunks a bit, which I think is due to the exhaust hitting the hardware for the diff mount. Still have to sort that out. After re-locating the oil cooler and better sealing the radiator for improved airflow, cooling is no longer an issue, at least not road driving. Track remains to be seen. The stock steering column had loose bearings, and it was driving me crazy because it clunked when the steering loaded up. I modified the electric power steering and replaced the column with a modified Woodward one. Now steering is rock solid. However, the stock turn signal/high beam controls no longer were viable so I added steering wheel buttons for those things, and also the reverse lockout switch. I am pretty much calling the car done. I mean, it will never be "done"....but it is fairly well sorted. I'm sure I will be tinkering with it as long as I own it. Plan is to put a few more road miles on it (has about 700 ATM) just so I feel reasonably comfortable in its reliability, then do some track days when the weather cools a bit.
    1 point
  46. I just ran some aluminum buttons that sit on top of my spring perch top hats. Holes and diameters seem about 0.010" off. But again I suspect the precision is fairly good and more a problem of accuracy. I think with the little practice I could dial this in if I need to. In the next few weeks I want to run some positional location tests to see how accurate I can center punch holes.
    1 point
  47. There's an article about the KN20 head on Road and Track, nice to see this thing get some recognition. https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a37360407/datsunworks-kn20-head-brings-dohc-to-the-240z/
    1 point
  48. hi! I printed it out of PLA, with 5 walls and 30% infill. the 5 walls were probably overkill. there wasn`t much pressure even pushing the center in, and the mold is SOLID. Here is an image of the cross section of the mold.. there is also a center plug and a tiny plug that sticks in the side, to create hole in the part that sticks out. here is all the parts, including the bolt that I used to squish the center in... essentially, since I wasn't pouring in material, I was injecting very slowly and painfully from a caulking gun, I slightly filled the bottom ridge (to avoid voids), then a ring around the bottom 1/3 in both halves (leaving the center part mostly empty, to be filled with the center plug) , like this: Then I put matted the two halves, put them in a vice (the holes on the side, with the square projections, are for nuts and bolts to hold the mold together, but ended up being too small) and pressed in the center bit in from the top, by hand at first, then finished it with the big bolt, through the center (with a nut under). that squished all the material up, filling almost all the mold without any voids. It would look like this (but filled and with a bolt running in the center, vertically): (the screws on top were for pulling the center out after it cured... it didn`t help actually, I wiggled it loose) After that, I pushed in the side plug (push then screw in the center plug) and filled the top from above. it worked out really well, with minimal waste.. I hope that's somewhat clear. if not, let me know what part isn't, and I`ll edit it to make sense.
    1 point
  49. I would recommend to use 16" rims as then you can also upgrade brakes to large size with no issues. I am running 16" x 8" with 245 45's on all four corners with no flares no rubbing https://www.tirerack.com/tires/TireSearchResults.jsp?zip-code=94545&width=245/&ratio=45&diameter=16&rearWidth=235/&rearRatio=50&rearDiameter=15 You can get these all street legal tires: Yokohama A008P, Advan AN052, Bridgestone Potenza Sport, Pirelli Pzero Rosso, Pirelli Pzero Collezione, Pirelli Cinturato P7 in 245 45 16
    1 point
  50. I thought the idea of the SubtleZ kit was to give you 1.5" extra width without looking like it was flared, so why add any lip flares to it? A stock body 240z with rolled fenders can easily handle a 245 in the front and a 245 to 275 in the rear with the right offset so with 1.5" extra you should be able to add some healthy rubber on the ground... I am going to build a RIPS RB34 for my Primadonna Z; love his engines!
    1 point
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