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  1. 2 points
    It's a spacer for the flex plate. You need to remove it anyway to mount your flywheel. Pretty sure it just pries off easily. Then the seal will be exposed.
  2. 2 points
    I noticed some traffic on my web site from HybridZ and was pleasantly surprised to see a thread opened on the CV axles. Thanks John! Mods, I'm new to this 'vendor' role, please let me know if I'm breaking procedures etc... I'll keep this theme to simply answering some of the questions raised above. Please don't hesitate to add questions and I'll continue to answer as best as I can - w/o giving up too much R&D. "...he seems to be quite a regular in the "Dime" community" - that I am. For the past 7 years I've been a proud owner of a 1972 Datsun 510 2 door, orange. I also own a 1976 280z that currently being built up into another fun toy and R&D test bed for future products. Much of my involvement on 'The Realm' has been sharing in my experimentation (Yamaha R1 carbs on a KA24e and MegaJolt EDIS ignition etc...) and learnings. "..I wonder if he is just cutting flanges off old u-joint axles and welding them on to "CV" axles..." - nope. I manufacture brand new adapters/flanges, accurate up to 4 thousands of an inch on centering/mounting to make them dead smooth. The flange's bolt-hole placement is left to CNC machining for repeatable accuracy. "...Not sure that they're much better than a u-joint axle though. What's the benefit?" - Several benefits: As the U-joints in our axles fail, finding replacements has been difficult, at least for me. Also, with lowered Datsuns, the larger angles within the axle exaggerates a U joint's inability to rotate at a constant speed. These newer CV axles (short for Constant Velocity), can rotate at more consistent speeds with larger angles. The end result is a noticeably smoother ride - even for Datsuns with seemingly fine stock axles. Another reputed benefit is more drivetrain efficiency and a couple percent increase power to the wheels. "I wonder where the came up with the torque limit. Breaking welds? " : A LOT of engineering went into these CVs - down to shear calculations, metals selected for the adapters and how it interfaces with the CV, impacts from tempering, redundancy in fastening etc... Calculations showed that the fastening/welding technique is ~20-30% higher than the stubs at their weakest point. Back to the question, the torque limit was placed because that's the approximate OEM limit that the axle is designed for, and I wanted to limit anyone trying these axles on over the top machines. As previously posted the axles are comparable to the Subaru STI which are quite capable. My guess on the weakest link now lies in either the axle splines or the shoulder/D bolts themselves. " Being that the stub axle is such a weak spot..." - I'm not sure where on the stub you are referring to but I do offer an integrated stub CV where an OEM STI stub is directly fastened onto the CV housing - in 3 different manners (it's NOT coming off!). It's really slick with only 4 bolts to fasten the axle onto a clip-in diff setup. A similar R200 version is in the plans for this spring as well. I hope that answers the questions. My CV axles are designed to fill a niche market and not directly compete with existing products/vendors. There are already several options for owners with massive HP and/or heavy track duty needs. My CVs, and frankly the basis of all my future products, are intended to be an affordable & original solution that offers a level of reliability (read: lack of maintenance) you expect from a street car, be it stock or with a moderate swap/upgrade powerplant.
  3. 1 point
    Hey Guys, I have been trying to figure out what I wanted to do for color uniformity on my datsun. I really wanted to get the car sand blasted and do a complete overhaul, but after swapping a l28et in the car, building and installing the megasquirt, and all the other tid bits... I was way over budget to say the least. To be cost effective I decided to do a vinyl wrap. 3m vinyl to do the whole car was only 500 bucks! The car itself was in no shape for vinyl. It had chips, dings, rust, you name it. I had to do all the body work to straighten it out. Here is some before pictures. The paint had to be sanded or removed to metal and bondo was applied. First time ever really doing body work and it looked OKAY. I did have a professional come and do the final things to the driver's side fender and door. Lots of chipping paint that needed to be sanded. After things were sanded and looked pretty good, spray can primer was sprayed on the trouble spots, then sanded, then black rustoleum, then sanded. Finally I wet sanded the car with 1000 grit and made sure all surfaces were smooth. Then the fun began. Vinyl took around 20 hours to finish in a weekend. This did not include the headlight buckets, turn signals, or cowling which I am still trying to figure out. The car being unibody caused issue. The rear bumper section is 1 piece which is then overlapped 1 inch by the quarter panel which is then overlapped by the roof. Knifeless tape was key to get smooth lines. The hood is harder then it looks because of the round center bubble. Really have to stretch and pull to get in on right. Also getting the vinyl to stick properly on the back required cleaning all edges and even applying loctite super glue.... I know not the right way, could use primer 94, but actually works! Just don't get that near any exterior surfaces or you will leave marks on the laid vinyl. Fenders are one of the easiest. Tucking around the wheel arch was a little tough. Make sure to clean these back areas so that no dirt is in between were you want the vinyl to stick on the inside. This is were I started to notice that my rusto paint would start to peel if we kept taking off and re-applying the vinyl. There are spots were you can see this for sure, but oh well.... it cost 500 dollars. Also you would get specs of shit for the same reason, small pieces of paint peeling up. Moral of the story. Only works on really good paint or paint that is strong against the body. Should have spent more time in that regard. Rear bumper area was pretty easy just a flat piece. The quarter panels were the most difficult. Trying to get around the rain gutter was a challenge. We accidentally cut the vinyl and had to pivot to a new plan regarding the roof. Paint was peeling up if we removed it so we went with what we got. If we were to peel it off... I would have to sand the whole quarter panel over again. Made it work, just needed to add an intermittent piece between the quarter panel and roof. Getting around the back taillight area was a little hard as you really need to stretch it. I assumed the inner edge would mostly be hidden by the taillight panel, but more is exposed then I thought. Might try to adjust this better. Roof and hatch were also pretty difficult. If you have old shitty gaskets around the glass. CHANGE THEM. Tucking underneath that shit would have been way harder than it already was. I got new rubber were needed and it was way worth it. If you mess up on a part like that... there goes 70 bucks in vinyl to redo it. Tucking worked best with knifeless tape in my opinion. Don't forget the sides of the windshield... I used a small inlay for that. Also the bottom area below the door is an inlay. Here is the vinyl result.... get it... vinyl result Might keep the windshield wiper area black... its scary when you see all the spots were it needs to be cut! Here is a picture of how we did the inlays from quarter panel to roof. It turned out pretty damn good if I say so myself. I have learned a lot about this process as I went because there is not too much info about unibody cars. I would say that this is a pretty difficult job and very tedious. Details are important, missing a cut or making a mistake can make it look bad. We had mistakes, bumps, paint chips you name it, but the point of this was to get the car looking good for a couple years for cheap until I am ready to get the car painted. What I would suggest if you want to do this... - Make everything really smooth. - If painting, take your time and get it to stick well. Paint peeling and sticking to the vinyl was the biggest issue I experienced. - Have a friend. My dad worked the whole time with me.... I can't thank him enough. I did a trial hood before all this on my own and it took 2 times as long and looked way worse. - Plan out all the cuts before you apply. Thought I would share my experience. If you have any questions about it let me know. I hope to reassemble the car in the next 2 weeks.
  4. 1 point
    Hey all, Wondering how fast (ET) any of you have gone in the quarter with stock 280 stub axles and flanges? I am not pushing mine very hard with an auto, and a tight converter, and running 12.05 to 12.08. I am putting it up on the converter to stage, so everything is preloaded and there is minimal shock.(235/60 mickey dr's) I would like to upgrade the heads, cam, ect, Should I upgrade the stubs before I go any harder? Thanks.
  5. 1 point
    Hello Hybridz Members! Three piece spoiler for Datsun s30 240z 260z 280z Product is made from fiberglass with a flat black primer finish. Hence, spoiler is not a finished product ready for paint. This spoiler has 2 mount holes in center piece and 2 on each individual corner. It also has 2 threaded inserts in center piece and 1 on each individual corner.Quality and fitment are really good, all spoilers are brand new and never installed. some modification might be needed for perfect fitment. Price $280 shipped! - I can provide a discount for a group buy (5 minimum) Item ships from California* Local pick up available Payment: Paypal or cash for local pick up Any questions please feel free to send a PM
  6. 1 point
    It's 36.3. You should check between filter and rail. If you're getting 60-70 before the filter you might have a clogged filter. But, in short, no offense...you're doing things wrong. Stop the random stuff and get in to the FSM or the EFI Book and do things the recommended way. You'll save time in the long run.
  7. 1 point
    Good catch. Thank you for pointing that out.
  8. 1 point
    TacticBurger, Do not post in an ad unless you are genuinely interested in buying. No negative comments will be tolerated. If you don't like something, walk away. And fix your location.
  9. 1 point
    All my suspension clunking is gone. The car is extremely solid now. The steering is a lot more reactive also. Overall I can't wait to try it out on the 21st at Buttonwillow. Also started the process of rebuilding an SR trans and and just waiting on a machined L series bellhousing right now from Godzilla Raceworks
  10. 1 point
    Poly bushings on the compression rod? You'll need to replace the poly bushing on the back side with a rubber bushing - otherwise you'll probably break the compression rod. Ask me how I know... There are a fair number of thread posts regarding the issue.
  11. 1 point
    I appreciate the review of the brake pad materials. I'm curious why you have not gone to a vented front rotor? That's the main reason I am changing from stock S30 brakes, as I like to drive road courses and brake cooling seems to be important. My setup will be 280ZX front calipers with turned down Z31 front rotors and Maxima rear calipers with late S130 rotors; I am shooting for a 280ZX-type brake system, so I will also swap in the 15/16 MC and late S130 prop valve. I would like to report results this summer, but there is so much to do on the car...
  12. 1 point
    1978 280Z Turbo Rebuilt L28ET 300ZX ECU reprogrammed by Jim Wolf Technologies- 91 Octane only Mustang Cobra Mass Air Flow Sensor 4-Piston toyota caliper front Disc brakes. Rear has original brakes. 5-Speed tranny with R-200 rear Tokicos 5-way adjustable shocks Front Mount intercooler Manual Boost Controller Turbo timer Reupholstered seats All new window seals Newer carpet Alpine Stereo -clean title Asking $16,000 OBO The headlight/wiper switch and Speedometer are not working speedometer stuck @85,xxx. No head liner. No A/C 323 717 Fifty Eight Forty. Text me if you have any offers or questions
  13. 1 point
    I am working on putting a passenger seat in my race car. Driver's side is on a slider and the mount on that side is totally different but thought I'd share how this non-adjustable pass side is going in. First thing was removal of the stock mount. I had done this on the driver's side 10 years ago or so and remembered it being a big PITA. I did not remember wrong. I really hate trying to get all the spot welds loose. I tried a spot weld cutter and ruined it after successfully cutting about 10 spot welds. Unfortunately there are a lot more than 10 spot welds holding the stock mounts in. After that I tried air saws and other tools, but finally ended up with the tool I hate (and use) the most: 4.5" angle grinder. I used a cutoff wheel and hacked the stock mounts out and ground down as much of what was left as I could. Pro tip: I had been using ear plugs but figured out I could use my new bluetooth over ear headphones to listen to music and podcasts, and I could hear my phone ringing and customers on my website chatting with me, etc. Huge upgrade. I cut the stock mounts out and stuck the seat on the brackets in the car to figure out where the seat mount would be fore/aft. Then I measured from the seam in the floor behind the seats to where the seat bracket would be. I drew a line on the floor where the rear of the rear mount tube would be, and another one 2" in front of that. I had already figured out that there was going to be 6 1/8" between the front and back tubes, so I measured another 6 1/8" and drew another line across and another one 2" in front of that. So now I've got 4 lines across the floor marking where the front and back of each tube would be. Then I cut long strips of 2" tall cardboard, and trimmed them to match the contour of the floor. I then traced them onto the 2x2 tubes and used an angle grinder with cutoff wheel to shape the ends of the tube. Getting the front and back templates lined up correctly is kind of a pain because the trans tunnel isn't straight, so line them up on the outside where they hit the rocker. and leave a little extra on and then grind to fit. On the driver's side I cut into the bottom of the mount tubes to clear the little hump in the middle of the floor. On this side I cut the hump in the floor. I think cutting the hump is easier. After the tubes were cut to shape and fit reasonably close to the contour of the floor, I welded in two 6 1/8" tubes to connect the two and spaced them to fit right where the subframe connectors are. Next I needed to locate the seat laterally. I put the mount in the car and set the seat on its brackets on top of the mount, and figured out where I wanted the seat, then drew lines on either side of the brackets. Knowing where the nuts needed to be to bolt the seat in, I cut square holes in the top of the tube. Then I cut 2 x 2 pieces of .100" sheet and welded nuts to them to bolt the seat brackets to. After that I bolted the 2x2 plates with nuts to the seat brackets and set them on top of the mount and tack welded them in place. I unbolted the seat and brackets and finished welding the plates in. Next I'll weld the top ends of the tube to the rocker and the trans tunnel. I'll stitch the two longitudinal tubes to the subframe connectors. I used a LOT of heat on the driver's side and melted through the floor to get good penetration into the SFCs. My floor was pretty bashed up when I got this car, so the floor doesn't fit perfectly on the bottom of the 2x2 tubing. Plan there is to beat the floor up to the tubing after the mounts are welded on the ends, then stitch across the front and back of the tubing to attach the tubes to the floor. That's today's project. The mount on the driver's side was as long as the slider for the seat, so more like 12". Like I said before, much different on that side.
  14. 1 point
    For my '71, I had the local high school metal shop cut one out on their plasma cutter. I gave them a pattern traced from the later style boot, including the screw holes. A real life project for the students and no cost, or skill required, for me. Win/Win! Dennis
  15. 1 point
    The current prototype... modified to use 5/8" bolts directly, without the sleeves on the Z31 mount, this saves some cost.
  16. 1 point
    On my '71, I cut a slight arch out of the console where the shift lever hit. When the leather/vinyl shift lever boot is in place, the cutout is not seen. Dennis
  17. 1 point
    So I found a true Nissan TPS at the JY and it is so much more accurate ! Don’t even know what model it came off of, but it works. Didn’t need to preload it or anything
  18. 1 point
    That is weird. You could release the three bent over clips (picture below) and pull the axles, leaving the sealing plate behind. Maybe you'll find something odd. Maybe they fastened the sealing plate on then assembled the CV afterward. People do strange things, like they did on your inboard CV. I posted a link to where my earlier picture came from that showed a source for the axles. They were used on 2+2 280ZX's or turbo 280ZX's. They're hard to find and sometimes the aftermarket parts are different. If you find one at a parts store take your old one to compare lengths. https://picclick.com/2x-CV-Joint-Axle-Assembly-Rear-Fits Datsun-280ZX-253130612896.html
  19. 1 point
    Hello HybridZ, just joined and wanted to say hi as i have some big plans for my 280z. Long story short, i currently own a fully build evo8, LS swapped FD RX7, and recently got into the S30 life. i had a 260z that i was going to fully restore, then found a 280z that fit my needs perfectly. Anyways, i just wanted to say hello and i am looking forward to all your support as im certainly new in the classic car world VIdeos Buying my 260z Buying my 280z 280z overview I put my 280z on a dyno
  20. 1 point
    Yep thanks wiring is ok. I found the problem, the voltage meter got damaged/jammed by sandlast media going in there during restoration process.... Will try to find another gauge..... Thanks everyone for your help!
  21. 1 point
    Will message you regarding purchase. All other questions covered in PDF https://www.dropbox.com/s/23dj8il5rru20i3/Z31%20Turbo%20CV%20axle%20ConversionV4.pdf?dl=0
  22. 1 point
    1975 2 seater with what we call over here the Californian floor pans due to the provision of a bulge for the cat converter of the day and a very irregular metal pressing check back when I have the pans this isn’t as hard as it looks
  23. 1 point
    I have a pair available. If you are interested email me at zedsn@hotmail.com
  24. 1 point
    I'm replacing most everything on my Z, and even trying to go as cheap as possible on everything, and using lots of junk yard parts and doing 100% of the labor myself, I still can't find a way to spend less then 15k. A much better way to do a "full" upgrade, would be to upgrade everything else that isn't engine related first (brakes, suspension, chassis strengthening, seats, paint, bodykit?, etc) before you touch the engine. As soon as the engine comes out, you'll want to upgrade everything "while you're there". At this point, just add 3-5 years onto whatever time budget you gave yourself unless you're one of those crazy singular focus ultra driven workhorses that apparently has no other hobbies. Man I'm jealous of those people. There's an Australian guy on youtube right who documented pretty much every aspect of his Z restoration. You might want to give his damn near 90 videos a watch and see if that's what you want to do. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_vb_SJctymCkwnF6sAwDg
  25. 1 point
    Dutchman Axles used to be a local company, then moved to Idaho. They're much smaller then Mosier, but big enough to not screw it up when you explain what you want.
  26. 1 point
    I honestly think these parts are pure bling....which is ok....but I don't see any performance improvement they would provide at all.... It seems to me there would be more benefit if they designed a part that tied together the rear control arm bushings, since they sit out somewhat cantilevered away from the body, I could see where there would be relative movement between them when loads are introduced. Even then, the benefit would be minimal, since the TTT conversion already has the "dog bone" tying them together. It would primarily be lateral movement rather than fore and aft movement, and these TTT parts seem designed only to address the fore and aft. As someone else mentioned, the control arm bushing mounts are tied pretty solidly together fore and aft by the control arms themselves. I think TTT knows that if they crank out cool, machined, anodized aluminum parts that bolt right into place, people are going to buy them just for the bling alone....without really thinking through whether there will be actual performance benefit. IMHO, these parts are a perfect example of that. I could see some appeal if the replacement front cross-member was at least designed to facilitate a dual exhaust....but it isn't.
  27. 1 point
    Ok, just took the 77/280 off the rotisserie so had a chance to weigh it, this is just the shell, all paint was removed then 2 coats of epoxy primer were applied and 2 coats of undercoat, the only thing left on the car is the vinyl headliner and the 2 rear wheel arch vinyls. Now I'm not 100% on this method but I couldn't think of any other way to do it with what I had on hand. With the car level the rear measurement was taken with the car hanging from the rotisserie bar that bolts on where the tie down hooks usually are, then jacks were placed under the rear rotisserie bar and the front was weighed hanging from the front rotisserie bar that is bolted to where the bumper shocks attach just in front of the radiator support. I checked the accuracy of the crane scale by lifting my small anvil which I know is 118 lbs and it was bang on, I have to apologize, I forgot to take a pic of the rear measurement but it weighed 289 lb, front was 246 lbs 289lbs 246lbs 535lbs minus the 6lbs of the rotisserie bars, is 529 lbs Someone with better geometry skills than me will have to verify if the method I used is valid.
  28. 1 point
    Lol yeah, I assumed as much. Figured on that first compression/decompression plastic ones would pop fairly quickly.
  29. 1 point
    Not much to report as the weather in the mid-west has been less than desirable. I got all of the drum brake parts removed and realized that my driver's side rear wheel bearing is starting to go bad. I attempted to use my slide hammer but have been unsuccessful with getting the stub axle removed. I'm waiting for a warmer day (anything above 50*) to take a space heater out there to warm up that area, blow torch it a bit, and then use the slide hammer again. Several parts arrived in January, which is always exciting. I snagged the AZC Mustache bar and brace used for about $250 less than retail. I was also able to find and buy a really clean finned diff cover, which pretty much completed the rear diff set up. At this point, it feels like I'll never have the rear end work done in time to drive the car in the spring, but I'll keep pushing through. I attached some pictures of the new parts below. I haven't mentioned this in my past posts, but I'm the outside sales manager at C&R Racing. I'm personally working on product development for many different platforms, including swapped S30s. The engineers and I are working on a dual pass set up that will work with both LS and RB/JZ swaps. I can keep everyone posted on that development in this thread.
  30. 1 point
    Not much to report. It’s been a rough year in far NorCal. Record fires last summer, and record snow this winter. Lost tress and fencing around the property and had to shut down the office a few days without power anywhere. Hoping and praying for an un-eventful weather pattern for spring and summer with plenty of opportunity to run the Z.
  31. 1 point
    Dang I can't find the link from a couple years ago. I think I saw something on Kameari's website about reproducing new castings of the mk63 calipers. They had pics of the rough castings pre machining. I had to translate the japanese obviously. I can't find it on their site now. It was awhile ago though maybe it wasn't Kameari. Parts Assist M Speed has the new units though. I know I wasn't on their site when I saw the post about the castings from a couple years back. These were a factory Z, hako, caliper for vented rotor. I'd run these. Not sure what the "stock" rules mean in his class but the mk63's were the road racing caliper back in the day weren't they? (I don't know too much about the old factory race car setups from back in the day) I've always assumed the mk63's were the homologation brake for one of the lower sports car classes. https://www.rhdjapan.com/parts-assist-m-speed-mk63-4pot-caliper-brake-kit-s30-s31-b110-gc10-kpgc10-pgc10-kgc10-kpc10-pc10-gc110-gc111-gc210-gc211.html *I would ignore the rotor diameter callout in the RHD description. Also, found this on the "other forum" should be some info in here. https://www.classiczcars.com/forums/topic/56999-looking-for-a-set-of-sumitomo-calipers-mk63/ Kameari should have a stock vented disc http://www.kameariengineworks.co.jp/Catalogue-v3/catalogue-075-20160731.pdf
  32. 1 point
    I used the eastwood on my car. It has the consistency of water, so cover under the car when you spray it because it will start coming out of all the holes, seams, cracks, etc.
  33. 1 point
    Thanks for the feedback! 'Plug and play' is definitely the goal here. Re-engineer as little as possible. Good news is that the STI diffs are getting cheaper. They've gone down a couple hundred from when I sourced one for my 510 a few years ago. I'd run the same setup for my 280z but I'm working on a potential R200 solution instead. If I understand your question, the OEM STI inner housing is not swap-compatible with the axle I source. I tried several ideas with no luck. The R180 STI stubs are welded onto the CV housing in 3 different locations. One weld along the entire perimeter of the stub's flange, three .4" plug welds through the flange into recessed pockets within the housing, and finally one large plug weld on the underside of the flange through the center of the housing. It's not coming off.
  34. 1 point
    Motor is rated for 120 hp 179 ft.lbs peak. I should get somewhat better acceleration around town than the stock L28 (particularly since I get peak torque now from 0-3500 RPM), but with a reduced top speed. Continuous power output is only ~40hp, so based on that and gearing/drag calcs I've found online puts top speed around 90-100 mph (this car has the 5-speed transmission), which IMO is plenty fast for a 40 year old tin-can of a car. I expect around 90-100 miles of range out of this once everything is dialed in (suspension leveled out, front aero cleaned up, etc).
  35. 1 point
    I was supposed to get the fuel hoses done, I ordered 5/8" and was sent 1/4" so I'm put off another week from finishing my fuel system. Still have plenty to do so next on the plan was to get the wiring done. This week I was able to get the rear section done. This is the first time I ever rewire a car and I think I'm doing pretty good from the condition the wiring was in before. I reused the old connectors with new terminals where I could instead of splicing new wires with old wires. It doesn't seem like a lot but it took a lot of time to research and plan what wires from the EZ harness goes into factory locations. Next week I'll have the front finished then may need help from a buddy to do the ignition and dash. I'm just saying, if I ever get rid of this car the next person will get a deal, the interior has been stripped, POR-15'd and Lizard Skin'd, new wiring and new interior ready to go in. And that's just a start. Video below, Subscribe if you don't mind. I'm working at getting better at making them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQTnTDAq1U8&t=9s
  36. 1 point
    Don't do this. Have patience, and spend more money (if necessary, vastly more money!) on a car with fewer problems. Otherwise you'll spend 5 years doing rust-repairs, 5 more years doing structural reinforcement, and 5 more years nursing your wounds after you realize in year 11 that new rust has already formed where you had replaced the old. Alternatively - and it sorely pains me to say this - look for a less rare, less rust-prone vehicle of comparable low weight... such as a Mazda Miata.
  37. 1 point
    Thanks for the welcome and the heads-up on community vibe. Honestly, my 'home' Datsun forum 'The510Realm' can also have some passionate members. I'm fine with respectful scrutiny as it's often just a 'why' or 'prove' question which is the basis of Critical Thinking and how we eventually engineer improvements - and the birth of these axles to be honest. The 510Realm thread that John linked to above was my coming out party, and the goal was to bring these CVs to the community Datsun gurus to scrutinize to death. Trusted members were given more in-depth engineering background and their subsequent honest opinions is posted for all to see. CV vs U-Joint is sort of like Fuel injection vs carb IMO. I nicely tuned carb setup runs pretty damn good and it's only 'disadvantage' to Fuel Injection is overall refinement (weather, startup, MPG). Both setups can run well and offer a specific experience. If a customer is looking for additional smoothness/refinement (basis for Restomoding), then any CV is a viable consideration. My 'business model' is a little unique, as previously mentioned DatsunRestomods is not my livelihood/source of secondary income, nor do I need it to be. This is my way to give back to the Datsun community and to fulfill a craving to create out-of-the-box solutions (and there's some good ones coming up IMO). The scope of my 'selling' will be limited to the vendor section. I'll post a thread there when ready along with pics of S30 installs - several are out there already.
  38. 1 point
    Mpg depends largely on engine management: carburetor vs. fuel injection, camshaft profile and so forth. 20 mpg should be readily attainable even with a more aggressive engine build. However, truly high efficiency, in the sense of a modern sports car, will be hard to attain - even with the 240Z's weight advantages. The reason is lousy drag coefficient... the bane of good highway mileage. To answer your questions: 1. Do as little as possible, at least initially! Complete the swap, get the engine running and the car sorted out. Engine mods can come later. 2. This is entirely subjective and situational. So enterprising drag-racers are pushing 500-700 hp (or more!) without molesting the "stock" look. 3. Never, ever ever install a non-overdrive transmission in a "daily driver" Z! Your application is screaming for a T5. 4. Initially, do nothing. Between your relatively weak stock 350 and the stock wheels/tires, the R180 differential in your 240Z should be adequate. Later you can swap in the much stronger R200. Search the "drivetrain FAQ" for model years/varieties from which to swap the R200. The #1 discriminator between failure and success, is the condition of the Z that's about to become the swap candidate. Rust? Overall condition? How is the suspension? The brakes? Do things work in general? Are bits falling off? Rubber? Plastic? Doors close properly? Dents/body damage? Electrical systems? You're about to do an engine swap. Don't also make it a restoration. The #2 discriminator is falling into the "while I'm at it" malaise. Do as little as possible! Laziness is always its own reward, but sometimes it's also this best route to quick and definitive success. This is one such instance. Be strategically lazy!
  39. 1 point
    So I'm happy with the design, unfortunately this part of my project is on the back burner for the moment. Focusing on getting my engine back in and running. But I'm super happy with preliminary testing. The plan for now is going to be to print them in ABS, finish them with acetone smooth and regular sanding, then mount them up.
  40. 1 point
    Searching facebook never works that well for me. I love forums.
  41. 1 point
    Thx to nice people on this forum, I found wat i needed! John Meyer you rock. Thx again John. Joost
  42. 1 point
    The shop is finally finished. At least as far as the county is concerned. The inspector just signed off on the final inspection!!! Time to get back to work on the Velo Rossa.
  43. 1 point
    I did mine out of hockey puck. Quite cost effective.
  44. 1 point
    I can tell you that the reinforcement in the doors adds 10lbs per door. I'm not sure that the bumper reinforcement stuff weights quite that much, based on a rough estimate of the square inches of metal, and the weight per square inch based on the thickness of the metal. I'd guess more like 15-20lbs per end. Could be wrong. Other areas of the chassis where early 280Zs have extra weight are the front frame rails, which, IIRC, have a reinforcement on the inside, the lower rad support, the rear strut towers, subframes under the floor, lower rear quarters, various bracketry, and likely a handful of places where you can't see that something's been added. Later 280Zs have even more reinforcement, notably in the door jamb area, and the spare tire well/gas tank area. John C has a few posts on the differences, and I believe he mentioned some additional metal in the roof structure as well, although I'm not sure if that was all 280Zs or just later ones. The series one shells do use thinner metal, I checked a few areas with a micrometer, and compared between my early '71 and '76 280z, as well as a few pieces from a '72 240z. the early '71 sheet metal came in around 0.9mm, whereas the later sheet metal came in slightly thicker at about 1mm. I believe (I'd have to look it up to be sure) that John C has also said that the early 240Zs and later 280Zs are 300lbs difference, and the late 240Zs and early 280Zs are 100lbs difference.
  45. 1 point
    ++1 Fel-Pro. 9 years since build with no leaks!
  46. 1 point
    Posting from another forum by the user sfm6s524. I am the seller. You guys can ask questions here or contact me by etsy as i check that more. Original etsy listing here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/668444381/datsun-240z-260z-280z-sun-visor-bracket?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=car+sun+visor&ref=sr_gallery-1-5&frs=1 On a 71 240 Z I have, the piece that holds the sun visors in place that mounts beneath the rear view mirror, broke on the drivers side. It was pretty annoying having the visor flop around, and I finally took the visor off until I could locate a replacement part. Searched all over the place for another, no luck. Finally saw one on Etsy from a person who has a 3D printer named PlasticWiz, figured I'd give it a try. Removed my old one, which basically disintegrated while trying to pop it loose from the vinyl covered roof frame. Sanded the new ABS piece a bit and painted black. I suppose the "print lines" could be removed completely with a lot of work, but for this car I just wanted a functional piece. Here it is mounted ready to pop in the rear view mirror. I've never used a 3D printed part on any of my cars, but I must say this really did the trick for a difficult part to find. Anyway, just thought I'd post this since I couldn't find any recent help on this part. I may order another for my other Z just in case...
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    I know i'm bumping an old thread, but I just purchased the Tanks Inc. setup to copy what you did. Thanks for the pics and info about the setup!
  49. 1 point
    This thread really helped me out; I recently bought a '72 240 off of eBay. It was great but the drivers side door had to be slammed to the point of concern or it would not fully latch. From inside the car it was very difficult. After finding this thread in a bout of restlessness last night; I went to Lowes and bought a 36" piece of 3/8" PEX pipe. PEX is made from polyethylene and is pretty similar to nylon in hardness and low friction. I trimmed a 3/8" piece off and made one cut along the side. After submerging it in boiling water for a few minutes, I formed it around the 1/2" handle of the x-acto I used to cut it with. It snapped right on the contact lobe of the door latch. The door closes almost without effort now. 15 minutes for both doors and $1.60 in materials. No grinding.
  50. 1 point
    A large rubber mallet(like something you would have seen in Looney Tunes Acme style), and some strong legs is all we had to straighten the passenger side out in mine. I braced myself against the top of the door threshold for short bursts while my buddy welded the pans down to get them perfect. A harbor freight dolly set also comes in handy to get any small bumps out one your done. Thanks guys, I dont really have much to offer Hybridz these days so its the least I can do until I can make a donation. Ray
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